Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • TSR Support Team
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    In the latest (January 2017) issue of PE (Professional Engineer, the magazine issued by the IMechE) there is an interesting feature ("Radical reform" ) about a, well, radical new engineering university, called the New Model in Technology and Engineering (NMITE), which is due to open in September 2019.

    The gist of it is essentially this:

    It's well known that a lot of engineering graduates do not go into engineering. One of the founders of NMITE reckons this may be due to the traditional way of that universities teach engineering.

    Therefore, the NMITE offers a very different approach. There will be no lectures. Instead, students will work in groups to solve "real-world" problems, with "as many as possible" coming from industry. Teachers would be available to provide guidance, it says, as well as sometimes representatives from industry.

    It will not require maths or physics for entry. This is based on professional advice. However, it will require at least AAB (at A-level, I'm presuming), in "academic" subjects for entry. Entry won't just be based on grades, though. It will involve an interview process, it says, that will also look for key engineering skills that employers seek but aren't demonstrated via A-levels.

    The degree itself will be an accelerated integrated masters liberal engineering degree (AIMLED). It will last for take three years to complete, and will involve longer academic years than a traditional degree. It will be divided into blocks of 13 weeks, and require a commitment of 46 weeks per year. It will be a general engineering degree, but focused on "themes" rather than specific disciplines.

    What do you all think about this? Something you'd be interested in?

    http://nmite.org.uk/

    Note: all info taken from the feature in Professional Engineering magazine, "Radical Reform", January 2017.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I think his theory about graduate destinations is wrong, a lot of engineering graduates don't go into engineering because they either weren't that interested in the first place or because the jobs aren't available. Arguably the former is something to be remedied but it's difficult to fix the latter.

    I wonder whether the undergraduate space is the best place to test this method, I would have thought a masters would be a better starting point.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    I think his theory about graduate destinations is wrong, a lot of engineering graduates don't go into engineering because they either weren't that interested in the first place or because the jobs aren't available. Arguably the former is something to be remedied but it's difficult to fix the latter.

    I wonder whether the undergraduate space is the best place to test this method, I would have thought a masters would be a better starting point.
    There's a massive engineering skills shortage in the U.K. Lack of jobs isn't the problem it's getting people to do them.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JamesN88)
    There's a massive engineering skills shortage in the U.K. Lack of jobs isn't the problem it's getting people to do them.
    There really isn't. A couple of niche areas are on the shortage list but there really isn't a shortage of graduates, it's just that no one particularly wants to train those graduates.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    I like the idea of it. However the word 'liberal' needs to be removed from the title. Makes it sound like an engineering degree mixed with liberal arts.

    I do wonder how the lack of maths and physics theory will go down. Can you really get a full understanding of say a photovoltaic system without some knowledge of quantum mechanics, there are many other examples that could be listed. Don't get me wrong, I've well aware that working in industry, chances are you'll not need to be doing intense vector calculus, or breaking out a Schrödinger equation, but the background to how things are derived, governed etc must be useful, and if not delivered via a lecture/seminar I'm not convinced you can easily combine real world problems with the theoretical background. I do agree the traditional lectures of someone with a powerpoint at the front of a room are fairly ineffective and result in most of the learning being done in a cramming session before a coursework or exam deadline.


    How does this new uni compare with already existing 'solutions' for filling this so called skill demand, for example the Dyson engineering school I assume offers a fairly hands on experience and surely has plenty of 'real world' problems.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    I like the idea of it. However the word 'liberal' needs to be removed from the title. Makes it sound like an engineering degree mixed with liberal arts.
    .
    Seems like that's what it might be
    • With a new approach to learning – based on real-world problem solving and the blending of high quality engineering, design, liberal arts and humanities with communication and employability skills targeted at the growth sectors of the future.
    http://nmite.org.uk/about/

    ----

    Anyway I like the sound of less dry lectures and more problem solving & creativity...


    also like 46 week academic year which I think means 3 calendar years to MEng incl mandatory industry placement.

    Not sure about losing the entry requirement for maths and physics... some of that stuff was actually useful IMO

    also not sure how it's going to fund itself, promises >3.5 contact hours per day- teaching of lab based courses at multi faculty unis is currently subsidised by the excess fees charged to students on the unis cheap to teach courses.

    also says it's got a 50:50 gender quota - and I don't think quotas are really the right way to go tbh

    also notice it's expecting to get some startup capital from the EU... dunno if HMG is going to step in and fill that gap.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    There really isn't. A couple of niche areas are on the shortage list but there really isn't a shortage of graduates, it's just that no one particularly wants to train those graduates.
    Yes, applications to engineering degrees have grown a lot recently (particularly in certain disciplines), and one thus assumes that class sizes have also grown, so there isn't necessarily a shortage of engineers at the graduate level.

    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    I like the idea of it. However the word 'liberal' needs to be removed from the title. Makes it sound like an engineering degree mixed with liberal arts.
    It is essentially an engineering degree that follows the liberal arts model of not specialising in a particular field. The article says it aims to promote engineering as a humanitarian discipline, not just a technical one, as well as include the other things that engineers need to know aside from just engineering.

    I do wonder how the lack of maths and physics theory will go down.
    I don't think it says anywhere that there will be no maths or physics theory. It won't require maths or physics for entry, but that doesn't mean that students won't learn such material as part of the degree. As it is projects based, students will have to learn the necessary material in order to properly complete the project. As there are no lectures, I would hope that they would receive adequate support if they were facing difficulties in learning the engineering-science required for the projects. But, I am sure that they will not be graduating without knowledge in the engineering-sciences.

    (Original post by Joinedup)
    Not sure about losing the entry requirement for maths and physics... some of that stuff was actually useful IMO
    I am sure, or would hope, that students would be able to close any maths and/or physics gaps in their knowledge during the course of their degree. I believe that UCL allows no longer requires maths or physics for entry to its civil engineering degrees, so this isn't without precedent, and the interview process will also hopefully be able to see who has enough ability or potential in this area, even if they don't have the formal qualifications, thus opening it up to people from technical backgrounds such as apprentices, or the military, for example.

    also not sure how it's going to fund itself, promises >3.5 contact hours per day- teaching of lab based courses at multi faculty unis is currently subsidised by the excess fees charged to students on the unis cheap to teach courses.
    Yes, at this moment, it still needs to find half of its funding, according to PE.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smack)
    -snip-
    I am sure, or would hope, that students would be able to close any maths and/or physics gaps in their knowledge during the course of their degree. I believe that UCL allows no longer requires maths or physics for entry to its civil engineering degrees, so this isn't without precedent, and the interview process will also hopefully be able to see who has enough ability or potential in this area, even if they don't have the formal qualifications, thus opening it up to people from technical backgrounds such as apprentices, or the military, for example.

    -snip-
    I did wonder if it'd be more suitable for non-traditional students rather than sixth form leavers... I've never seen a uni say this openly but looking at some undergrad courses out there (not specifically engineering) I see some that just seem to make a lot more sense for people who've established a career and want to move up.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.