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    hi, my names michael and im starting my AS-levels at the moment...i was just wondering what a-level subjects would universities most prefer for the Radiography course. I chose Computing, Psychology, Biology and Chemistry. Are those suitable AS-level subjects for this type of course? I'm planing to drop chemistry at the end of the year, as i hear it's pretty hard but im not too sure yet. By the way, the only reason i'm going for this course is because my dad recommended it, saying after i have a degree in radiography, i can then specialise. Because when i saw the salary for a normal radiographer i was shocked...£19k - £24k yearly. So i was wondering if there are other things i could specialise in, which provides a higher salary, and wondered if this would take long to get a degree in.

    thanks in advance.
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    I wouldnt do it just because your dad said so, theres lots of health science courses if you're interested in them. Btw I did radiography work experience and there were no male radiographers! There are very few males in the health sciences. Just a heads up
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    personally, i was thinking of something like Biomedicine...or something in that catergory, after spending a few hours searching for what courses that suited me.
    is biomedicine too much of a high aim for me?
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    Male radiographers do exist. There are also different types of radiography (therapeutic and diagnostic).

    As far as the salary goes, 19k is the starting point for most graduate health professionals (apart from doctors or dentists).
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    I didn't say they don't exist, I suggested they are few and far between which is true. On the whole the health sciences are dominated by women.

    I'm not sure what you mean by biomedicine, like biomedical science? Thats a very poular course and is well within your grasp if you do A2 Biology and Chemistry. You should ask yourself what you want to do when you finish your degree. I guess biomedical would allow you to either enter general graduate jobs, or apply for post grad medicine or dentistry if you wanted. You could be a biomedical scientist working in hospital labs but thats an aquired taste.. its kinda low paid as well.
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    ohok, lol, sorry for the later reply, its just that i have another question,
    im to go for a career in diagnostic radiography, are subjects like biology, psychology and im not too surewhich to choose for my 3rd, because my brother who does medicine in imperial says A2 chemistry is very hard, however i also find computing a little tedious (the programming part and the huge coursework).
    any suggestions on A2 chemistry and computing and if my subjects are suitable this diagnostic radiography course?
    thanks in advance
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    (Original post by welcome_to_the_jungle)
    I wouldnt do it just because your dad said so, theres lots of health science courses if you're interested in them. Btw I did radiography work experience and there were no male radiographers! There are very few males in the health sciences. Just a heads up
    In the hospital I work at it seems to be fairly evenly split. Perhaps more male radiographers.
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    hey i'm a final year student diagnostic radiographer!! i think lot depends on which departments you were taken to as some departments will be very thin on the ground with male staff to to the nature of their departments e.g breast imaging.

    Departments like A & E, Fluro, CT, MRI and the general depts should all have more strongly staffed male staff around, we are out here but there aint many of us!! its still a very strongly female dominated area. this said no one really pays much attention to this as you just get on with your job and work as a team.

    If you are considering a career in radiography make sure you do your research as the course is very stressful and its alot harder than alot of other health courses E.g you level of anatomy knowledge will be comparable to that of a doctor! .it needs to be a job you can see yourself doing for 30 yrs + unless you choose to go into some other medical area. This said now there is lots room to move departments and specialise in areas such as Fluro, MRi, CT, A &E, Ultrasound.

    It is all worthwhile tho in the end, just a pain in the arse whilst your at university but this doesnt las long then your thrown out into the clinical areas to practice your radiography.

    On a final note i think you should know its a practical job even tho you do a 3 yrs degree course.

    Nedd anymore help just ask! good luck for the future tho!
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    Micheal, I have just had a read of your post where you saw "the salary for a normal radiographer i was shocked...£19k - £24k yearly. So i was wondering if there are other things i could specialise in, which provides a higher salary, and wondered if this would take long to get a degree in."

    You need to understand that this is just a starting wage, also that radiographers even tho we are the most important people in the hosptal DONT get any grattiude for the job we do! everyone in the hospital takes us for granted, however the whole hospital will but up ****e street without us!

    Radiography is goin though a period of change at the moment. the NHS has introduced the Agenda for change and as a result radiography has changed!. we have been given the 4 tier structure which means that we now have:

    Assistant Practioners (these are bsically helpers for radiographers)

    Practioners (which are newly qualifed radiographers this is Pay band 5/6 so between £19,683 - £25,000

    Advanced Practioners ( these are pay band 6/7 so bout 25,326 - 37,326 these are senior radiographers who report or do other things, then we have.

    Consultant practioners these are pay band 8a i think but they prob command a higher wage than this, £37,326 - £43,535

    If you get a copy of the Agenda for Change document its all explained in there but it is quite hard to understand.

    Also you prob wont get the chance to speicalise until you have been qualified for 2 yrs, however this is totally dependant on where you work and your boss and the hospital needs. As a final yr diagnostic radiography student, i can tell you the course is hard. there is lots you need to know and be able to understand. Also won't really get any proper experience til you are qualified cause all the time through your training someone will be watching you and checking your images and asking you questions about them.

    This all goes on quailfication, i can tell you 'm scared ****less at the thought i will be qualifed in a yrs time. As it doesnt not feel like you have done much!

    Also th prob with specialing so early is that you will lose basic radiographer skills such as Plain flim imaging techniques. i feel its best to understand these before moving into depts like CT, MRi, Ultrasound or RNi.

    Hope this helps!
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    (Original post by KenHall06)
    Micheal, I have just had a read of your post where you saw "the salary for a normal radiographer i was shocked...£19k - £24k yearly. So i was wondering if there are other things i could specialise in, which provides a higher salary, and wondered if this would take long to get a degree in."

    You need to understand that this is just a starting wage, also that radiographers even tho we are the most important people in the hosptal DONT get any grattiude for the job we do! everyone in the hospital takes us for granted, however the whole hospital will but up ****e street without us!
    point about salaries - valid point also excludes unsocial hours payments when you work evening and weekend shifts and the gobs stuffed with arytons that is the joke of 'on call' for radiographers

    a hospital could survive quite happily without radiogrpahers as many other health professionals can and do become 'operators' under IR(ME)R and most 'practitioners' under IR(ME)R are medically trained

    another significant issue is the number of radiographers that refuse without reason to undertake investigations which are clinically indicated ... especially if the referrer is a non medicla referrer ( but still IR(ME)R competent to be on the referrer list ...)

    then there is the attiude of 'it isn't broken so you didn't need to X ray ' ...
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    i take it you dont work in a hospital then ZippyRN?? or if you do you like so many other medical professionals dont know what a radiographer really does!

    we do more than just push a button!! i sincerely doubt that other health care professionals could do the job of a radiographer just like i havent got a clue how to do the job of a physio!. There is far more to radiography that just pushing the button!!!

    I expect that your either a doctor or a ENP nurse who more than likely looks a patient and say oooh u need a xray when most times they just need some tablets and a plaster! its also sounds to me that your annoyed that us radiographers can turn round and say no to an x ray request! we do that cause if we dont people like you would be x raying every tom dic and harry!. I think its funny you speak about IR(ME)R 2000, do you know what these are??? or why we have them???

    I would also love to know why you call our on call a "joke", at my hospital radiographers do a 22 hours shift!! whats ur typical on call hours?? about 9 or 10 hours shift!!

    I dont really wanna get into a public arguement with you, however you obviously have something against radiographers!! i think you should get over it! also where you get this dumb idea that a hospital could work as normal without radiographers. unless you have x ray eyes who else you getting to do the x rays??? its harder than it looks to be good at plain film radiography. i would acutally like to know what profession you are!!
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    (Original post by KenHall06)
    i take it you dont work in a hospital then ZippyRN?? or if you do you like so many other medical professionals dont know what a radiographer really does!
    i do work in a hospital, in fact i've worked in severla hospitals and most of them in emergency care.

    we do more than just push a button!! i sincerely doubt that other health care professionals could do the job of a radiographer just like i havent got a clue how to do the job of a physio!. There is far more to radiography that just pushing the button!!!
    odd then that there are plenty of none radiographers who are IR(ME)R operators ( plenty of hand surgeons for start, not tomention the interventional cardiologists etc... ) as well as referrers and there are all some who achieve the trinity or all three of opeator, referrer and practitioner ...

    I expect that your either a doctor or a ENP nurse who more than likely looks a patient and say oooh u need a xray when most times they just need some tablets and a plaster!
    and how many hundreds to thousands hours did you spend learning hands on clinical examination and history taking skills? and how long did you spend consolidating those practical clinical skills under the guidance of higher trainee, staff specialist and consultant doctors and experienced Nurse Practitioners

    its also sounds to me that your annoyed that us radiographers can turn round and say no to an x ray request!
    when you take accountability for the patient you can refuse to do the examination that is indicated by the overall findings of history taking and clinical examination findings, but as a very small number of radiographers have the skills , knowlede and experience to declare competence in such matters, just run along and do what has been asked of you by the Health professional who is accountable for the management of the patient.

    I see you carefully avoided the issue of radiographers who refuse clinically indicated examinations requested by non-medicla referrers.

    on call is a joke when patients who have been admitted acutely or have taken a sudden turn for the wosrse do not get timely imaging which may influence the clinical decision making of the Dcotrs and Nurses looking after that patient. the bullet needs to be bitten and shift working introduced - labs seem to have managed it either that or cut the on-call hours down to the wee small hours rather than 1730 - 0900.

    Nursing and Medicine have moved away from on call working in services which are required around the clock on a regualr basis by significant numbers of patients - in the acute hospital setting the only nurses outside senior management grades that routinely do on call working are those who work in operating theatre type environments becasue the call for emergency endoscopy 'planned emergency ' operations and primary PCI is relatively small, however many acute admissions require one or more plain films in a timely manner and increasingly the need for 'out of hours' CT scanning for head injuries and 'brain attack' presentations means that on call working will not be sustainable

    we do that cause if we dont people like you would be x raying every tom dic and harry!.
    no i don't think so you forget that the referrer is as accountable if not more so than the Operator ... especially as it's the referrer who has actually examined and assessed the patient


    I think its funny you speak about IR(ME)R 2000, do you know what these are??? or why we have them???
    yes to manage imaging - to prevent bline 'just push the button' practices , to provide the optimal risk benefit balance, not to prevent people from making an adequate assessment and formulate a diagnosis


    I would also love to know why you call our on call a "joke", at my hospital radiographers do a 22 hours shift!! whats ur typical on call hours?? about 9 or 10 hours shift!!
    see above

    I dont really wanna get into a public arguement with you, however you obviously have something against radiographers!! i think you should get over it! also where you get this dumb idea that a hospital could work as normal without radiographers. unless you have x ray eyes who else you getting to do the x rays??? its harder than it looks to be good at plain film radiography. i would acutally like to know what profession you are!!
    odd then that many settings manage without radiographers ( cruise ships - nurses and doctors as operators , military settings again urses , doctors and pure technician operators, hand lists in the operating thetare using a surgeon contolled mini c-arm ) or as seen elsewhere in the world with purely technician operators - although there are issues there aobut over imaging - but that's down to blindly following doctors orders to image rather than suggest that other views or modalities may be as useful with a better risk /benefit analysis ...

    also modern plain film imaging techniques can hide a multitude of sins with automatic exposure control and digital processing
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    What a complete Muppet you are! i actually think your dangerous! i could use a lot stronger language but i don’t think you would understand me! You obviously don’t have a grasp about radiation protection and all these people you talk about in IR(ME) Regs are they all Consultant ?? Hence doctors???. Also explain what are Practioners? and operators??

    Also please since you know a lot about the automatic exposure devices (AED) tell me about them?? (i never use this AED, i set my own exposures) When have YOU used this device as if you are not trained in radiation protection it really should be classed as a clinical incident! Bit like you really how scary are you!

    You have just sited all the reason why you need Radiographers and Radiologists along with your shocking use of spelling. I hope I never have to come across you in my professional career as I could happily kick you out of my x-ray room!
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    Hi Everybody!
    I'm currently a radiologic technology student in US. I gonna be diagnostic radiographer. US requirement is AS degree.(2 years, 77 credit hours total) I plan on moving to UK eventually and I'd like to know how to become a radiographer in UK. Do I have to study more or I could apply for license in UK with my current AS degree? Thanks for any information.
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    I think it would be best to contact the Health Professions Council (HPC) as they are who we have to register with as radiographers when we qualify. You would have to register with them to work in the UK but im not sure if you would need to do any other study but they could answer your queries. The web address is www.hpc-uk.org
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    The rules over here belka783 for radiography are simple, you have to have a BSc (Hons) Degree in either Diagnostic Radiography or Radiotherapy and be state reg with the HPC. If any uk radiographer wants to work in the USA we have to do a test to see if we are up to your standard as our degrees are not accepted in the USA.

    If i was you i wouldnt bother with the HPC cause well they aint really that useful, i'd contact the College of Radiographers and ask them about what you need to do.

    The college address is http:www.sor.org

    hope that helps
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    im guessing zippyrn is a nurse. (rn standing for registered nurse perhaps?). most nurses knock down the radiography profession, mostly due to jealously. radiographers get more recognition than nurses. they also make a lot more than nurses and have greater chances of promotion. nurses see them as having an 'easy' job. they are jealous of how much 'easier' radiographers have it in terms of working conditions and working environment. lets face it, theres a reason why so many leave nursing!! stop knocking down other professions and stop complaining about how hard your job is when you chose this job in the first place. you knew what the working conditions and pay was like. stop whining.
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    Of course KenHall06 knows best.
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    TO KenHall06 Thanks for info so as I understand it's a 4 year bachelor's not like ours 2 year associate's right? that sucks, way too long for just being radiographer, I do not know why US does not recognize UK BS degree cause it much better than AS: stupid rules, xray is xray anywhere you go.
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    (Original post by starz)
    im guessing zippyrn is a nurse. (rn standing for registered nurse perhaps?). most nurses knock down the radiography profession, mostly due to jealously.
    why would i be jealous of someone with minimal actual patient contact and no hands on clinical skills ?

    radiographers get more recognition than nurses.
    from whom exactly ?

    they also make a lot more than nurses
    no they don't especially in those places where on call working for plain film has rightly been consigned to the history books

    and have greater chances of promotion.
    incorrect

    nurses see them as having an 'easy' job. they are jealous of how much 'easier' radiographers have it in terms of working conditions and working environment.
    what a load of utter twaddle

    lets face it, theres a reason why so many leave nursing!!
    care to justify that statement as i've not actually known anyone that i worked with that has 'left nursing' except for a number of colleagues who have reached their full pension point and retired ...

    stop knocking down other professions and stop complaining about how hard your job is when you chose this job in the first place. you knew what the working conditions and pay was like. stop whining.

    that's somewhat irrelevant, especially when the 'knocking' was from ignorant radiographers who do not appreciate the accountability that a referrer has for the management of the patient vs the accountability the operator has for the patient in the grand scheme of things ... odd also that practitioners get involved they often end up in a position where they have no alternative to undertaking some kind of imaging even if it isn't the exact examination requested originally.

    we still haven't had an answer to how many hours of learning radiographers have in hands on clinical examination and assessment to be able to refuse indicated examinations
 
 
 
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