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    Ok I just got rejected from RVC after my interview. I have had 2 other interviews and heard nothing from the other. This is honestly the worst feeling ever, I hadn't thought it went that badly which is making me worry that the other unis won't give me an offer.

    Can anyone please give me some advice. I want this more than anything and put so much into making this happen and now I don't even know if I'll be going to uni.

    😢
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    (Original post by lou_16)
    Ok I just got rejected from RVC after my interview. I have had 2 other interviews and heard nothing from the other. This is honestly the worst feeling ever, I hadn't thought it went that badly which is making me worry that the other unis won't give me an offer.

    Can anyone please give me some advice. I want this more than anything and put so much into making this happen and now I don't even know if I'll be going to uni.

    😢
    Sorry you got rejected, but just remember that veterinary medicine is always oversubscribed and that they have to turn away applicants that are very high quality, so being rejected doesn't mean you were rubbish! Also, many people don't get as many interviews, or any at all, so the fact that you got multiple interviews is an achievement in itself, although I know it might not feel like it just now. Just because you got rejected from RVC doesn't mean the others will have the same outcome- remember each uni is looking for something slightly different, so don't give up hope just yet! If worst comes to the worst, you can always reapply for 2018 entry, giving you time to get more work experience and improve your application- a lot of vet students are 2nd time applicants.

    You can still make becoming a vet happen, so don't let this rejection get you down- learn from it and continue to put your energy into your studies because you don't know the full outcome of your UCAS application- you only need one offer to get into uni.
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    This is a modified version I wrote two years ago when I was waiting to hear back from some interviews myself. It seems relevant now:

    It's understandable that you're upset. A rejection post interview is, in a sense, more harsh than one before. Exams can be resat, more work experience can be done, personal statements can be improved, but if the flaw is apparently YOU as opposed to your lack of experience, what are you supposed to do? Its rejection on a personal level after you made it so close to the finishing line. Of course it is going to hurt.

    And it will hurt. It will hurt for days, weeks, maybe even months. But eventually those feelings will fade, and with time it will be remembered as just 'one of those things' as opposed to something that actively stopped you from getting where you want to be. I think we've all suffered rejection in the past. Thinking back to year 10, I was devastated when I was turned down for work experience placements. Now I think it's ridiculous that I ever allowed myself to get so worked up over it. My emotions were still perfectly valid at the time, but when you're upset you begin thinking irrationally. At the time I thought I had no chance of ever getting into vet school if I couldn't even do X, Y and Z before I applied. That obviously wasn't true. I worked around it, as you can work around this.

    The thing about rejections, awful though they may be, is that they are very telling of the person that receives them. I'm not talking about their reaction to the disappointment (although that is also significant), rather the fact that they received one in the first place. If you got a rejection then that means you were punching above your weight, aiming for something out of your reach. We all know how competitive the course is; that is no mystery before or during the application process. It would be so much easier, therefore, to apply for something easier to get into. It would be so effortless to coast through life, never setting your sights higher than eye level and only taking the opportunities handed to you. Getting a rejection means that, if nothing else, you had the courage, grit and determination to do something that you knew may not end well. And you should feel proud of yourself for that.

    Some people try to look at these situations by telling you that it's not the end of the world, but in a way, it is. It's the end of an imaginary world where everything was going to go well. If you've lived and made plans in that world for years then it's natural to be disappointed. People also say that 'it was meant to be'. I'm not sure if I agree with that, and it can definitely be hard to look at things that way when something awful happens. What happened was not predetermined, but it's what did happen, and the best way forward is to reflect on performance this time and use what you've learnt to improve your other applications. You still have interviews to hear back from! It is NOT the end of the road until you get a response from everywhere, and even then; there's always next year!

    That's not to say that you're not allowed to be sad about it. It's a disappointment and it's healthy to react accordingly. Cry if you have to, but make sure that eventually you pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and move on to the future. If necessary (and for goodness sakes you don't even know if if it will be, yet!), fix up your application (for interview technique; practice with people, film yourself and watch it back, watch videos online, search up current affairs etc etc), and go and make the best of the other options that are still open. It also might help to keep a giant tub of ice cream in the freezer. It's hard to feel bad when you have Ben & Jerry's

    Best of luck over these next few days. Your other applications may end up with offers this time or they may not. I know I'm wishing for the former for you, but even if things don't turn out the way you hope they will this time, I know you'll get there eventually with a bit of determination You still have other universities to hear from, and if they don't give you the response you're after go off and have an amazing gap year and try again. Loads of people end up trying two, three or even four times to make it, you'll get there if you want it enough.

    (Anyway, think of all they money you'll save by not living in London )
    • Very Important Poster
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    Same scenario was posted yesterday. reapplying is common. It is just very competitive. If you really wnat it stick at it. Am sure LTC's post above is full of sage advice.
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    (Original post by Little Tail Chaser)


    This is a modified version I wrote two years ago when I was waiting to hear back from some interviews myself. It seems relevant now:

    It's understandable that you're upset. A rejection post interview is, in a sense, more harsh than one before. Exams can be resat, more work experience can be done, personal statements can be improved, but if the flaw is apparently YOU as opposed to your lack of experience, what are you supposed to do? Its rejection on a personal level after you made it so close to the finishing line. Of course it is going to hurt.

    And it will hurt. It will hurt for days, weeks, maybe even months. But eventually those feelings will fade, and with time it will be remembered as just 'one of those things' as opposed to something that actively stopped you from getting where you want to be. I think we've all suffered rejection in the past. Thinking back to year 10, I was devastated when I was turned down for work experience placements. Now I think it's ridiculous that I ever allowed myself to get so worked up over it. My emotions were still perfectly valid at the time, but when you're upset you begin thinking irrationally. At the time I thought I had no chance of ever getting into vet school if I couldn't even do X, Y and Z before I applied. That obviously wasn't true. I worked around it, as you can work around this.

    The thing about rejections, awful though they may be, is that they are very telling of the person that receives them. I'm not talking about their reaction to the disappointment (although that is also significant), rather the fact that they received one in the first place. If you got a rejection then that means you were punching above your weight, aiming for something out of your reach. We all know how competitive the course is; that is no mystery before or during the application process. It would be so much easier, therefore, to apply for something easier to get into. It would be so effortless to coast through life, never setting your sights higher than eye level and only taking the opportunities handed to you. Getting a rejection means that, if nothing else, you had the courage, grit and determination to do something that you knew may not end well. And you should feel proud of yourself for that.

    Some people try to look at these situations by telling you that it's not the end of the world, but in a way, it is. It's the end of an imaginary world where everything was going to go well. If you've lived and made plans in that world for years then it's natural to be disappointed. People also say that 'it was meant to be'. I'm not sure if I agree with that, and it can definitely be hard to look at things that way when something awful happens. What happened was not predetermined, but it's what did happen, and the best way forward is to reflect on performance this time and use what you've learnt to improve your other applications. You still have interviews to hear back from! It is NOT the end of the road until you get a response from everywhere, and even then; there's always next year!

    That's not to say that you're not allowed to be sad about it. It's a disappointment and it's healthy to react accordingly. Cry if you have to, but make sure that eventually you pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and move on to the future. If necessary (and for goodness sakes you don't even know if if it will be, yet!), fix up your application (for interview technique; practice with people, film yourself and watch it back, watch videos online, search up current affairs etc etc), and go and make the best of the other options that are still open. It also might help to keep a giant tub of ice cream in the freezer. It's hard to feel bad when you have Ben & Jerry's

    Best of luck over these next few days. Your other applications may end up with offers this time or they may not. I know I'm wishing for the former for you, but even if things don't turn out the way you hope they will this time, I know you'll get there eventually with a bit of determination You still have other universities to hear from, and if they don't give you the response you're after go off and have an amazing gap year and try again. Loads of people end up trying two, three or even four times to make it, you'll get there if you want it enough.

    (Anyway, think of all they money we'll save by not living in London )
    Well said Little Tail Chaser
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    It only counts as a failure if you give up.

    I know now it seems like the end of the world but wait and see what happens with your other offers. A gap year isn't the end of the world to gain more experience, money and life experience. I took a year out before vet school and I'm really glad I did.

    I second the motion for Ben & Jerrys.
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    I'm so sorry to hear this, but keep trying.

    15 years ago I missed the grades to get into Vet School and was told I'd never get into the course...ever. It was based on first sitting and it was the end of the road for me.

    If you are like me you will keep fighting to follow your dream and you have the opportunity to do so next year.
    It's not the end of the road... 😊

    Here I am 15 years on with a place...
    Who knew!
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    Thanks for all your advice and encouragement. It has helped make it easier to deal with. Unfortunately I have been rejected again but I knew I had messed up part of the interview.

    I will keep hopes up for the other 2 universities as haven't heard anything from yet .
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    (Original post by lou_16)
    Thanks for all your advice and encouragement. It has helped make it easier to deal with. Unfortunately I have been rejected again but I knew I had messed up part of the interview.

    I will keep hopes up for the other 2 universities as haven't heard anything from yet .
    Sorry to hear this, but maybe an offer will pull through.
    If not you can apply next year and do loads of stuff before you start uni.
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    (Original post by Ramzoid)
    Sorry to hear this, but maybe an offer will pull through.
    If not you can apply next year and do loads of stuff before you start uni.
    I really hope so, however I the university I haven't heard anything from was the worst interview of all of them! So I might start planning all the amazing work experience I could do on a gap year 😊. Definitely won't be giving up 👍
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    I have finally got an offer 🎉 thank you everyone for your support. Now to smash these exams!
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    (Original post by lou_16)
    Ok I just got rejected from RVC after my interview. I have had 2 other interviews and heard nothing from the other. This is honestly the worst feeling ever, I hadn't thought it went that badly which is making me worry that the other unis won't give me an offer.

    Can anyone please give me some advice. I want this more than anything and put so much into making this happen and now I don't even know if I'll be going to uni.

    😢
    Don't worry too much xx I'm sure you're a strong candidate ... maybe they didn't think you were right for RVC.
    If you don't get in to your top 5 there's always clearing x
    Good luck x
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    (Original post by lou_16)
    I have finally got an offer 🎉 thank you everyone for your support. Now to smash these exams!
    Yay congrats! Where for.
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    (Original post by Ramzoid)
    Yay congrats! Where for.
    Surrey Uni! They only want AAB too 😂
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    (Original post by lou_16)
    Surrey Uni! They only want AAB too 😂
    Well that's excellent news!
    Good luck but I'm sure you'll be fine.
    I had 2 assessments left on my course to do (out of the several I've done over the year).
    I'm meant to achieve an 80% average and I'm sitting on 96%.
    It's quite exciting.
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    (Original post by lou_16)
    Surrey Uni! They only want AAB too 😂
    Congrats on your offer and best of luck in your exams! Good on you for persevering...I know it's cliché, but everything happens for a reason. I hope we'll be welcoming you to Surrey this autumn!

    All the best,
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    (Original post by lou_16)
    I have finally got an offer 🎉 thank you everyone for your support. Now to smash these exams!
    Well done! Genuinely really pleased to hear that
 
 
 
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