I need some help on my GCSE maths et congrats to all those GSCE and A level poeple. Watch

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honeyloco
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Report Thread starter 15 years ago
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I know you porbably get this alot and some people can be quite mean and persistant. but i would really like some pointers. i'm doing height and weight... the mayfield school. anyone know it?
well you see i know the basics of what to do. obviously. but i'm getting myself all worked up about which graphs i should do and for what

if you only help me in one area could it be persifically about culative frequency and that, the one you group the all together and do some sums and you then do a graph?

Doing the graphs I can do but, i dont know why i'm doing them... what they show me.

i'm sorry to ask.

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#2
Report 15 years ago
#2
(Original post by honeyloco)
I know you porbably get this alot and some people can be quite mean and persistant. but i would really like some pointers. i'm doing height and weight... the mayfield school. anyone know it?
well you see i know the basics of what to do. obviously. but i'm getting myself all worked up about which graphs i should do and for what

if you only help me in one area could it be persifically about culative frequency and that, the one you group the all together and do some sums and you then do a graph?

Doing the graphs I can do but, i dont know why i'm doing them... what they show me.

i'm sorry to ask.

[email protected]
your doing them to show there is a correlation between height and weight. also your showing that there is a natural distribution - ie that more people in the middle, less people at the extremes (less light and less heavy people). To really make the most of using ***. freq. you need to do seperate graphs for boys and girls. As from here you should be able to show that the boys are generally heavier, as they are generally taller or vice versa. You should try to discover the median, and interquartile ranges - from these you should be able to draw box plots. This will graphically show that boys are in generally heavier as the boxplots will be negatively skewed(pushed to the right) for the boys.

Another method to show how closely correlated the data is, is to use a formula called the product moment correlation co-efficient. It uses a series of deviations which gives you an answer which is either +1 or -1. if it is zero is shows there is no correlation. Now you need a stats 1 book to find this formula...

if you didn't get any of this just ignore it - as im not sure what sort of GCSE level you are at.

soz about the lame explantion but i hope you understood the first paragraph at least.
honeyloco
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#3
Report Thread starter 15 years ago
#3
ignore it?!!! no way. that was a huge help. anything else you can add. thats the kind of thing i was stuck on, why i'm doing the graphs, thanks anymore help from anybody will be greatly appriciated
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