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    Due to this having finished it's cessation period 5 days ago, there is no mandatory process which I must adhere to, so I have decided to return this to a first reading.

    Organ Donation Act 2017 (Second Reading), TSR Government






    Organ Donation Bill 2017 (Second Reading)
    An Act to change the organ donation system to an 'opt-out' one





    BE IT ENACTED by the Queen’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—

    1: Definitions
    (1) The MCA is the 2005 Mental Capacity Act which contains a list of conditions that limit an individual's mental capacity.

    2: Opt Out System
    (1) Once a person turns 18 they will be automatically put on the NHS Organ Donation Register.
    (2) Anyone who has previously opted out may will be able to opt back in via the normal procedure.
    (2) The Secretary of State with responsibility for Health will make provision for individuals to be removed from the register if they so request.
    (3) The Department of Health will collect all information it does not currently have on the blood type of citizens.

    3: Exemptions
    (1) People who are not considered to have capacity under the MCA shall not automatically be added to the organ donation register.
    (2) Doctors must notify the NHS of any adult who has diseased, severely damaged or infected organs and the person in question shall be permanently removed from the register.

    4: Information
    (1) People will receive a letter when they turn 16, notifying them that when the turn 18, they will automatically be added to the organ donation register. This letter will explain that they can now opt-out if they wish.
    (2) 3 months before eligible people turn 18, they will be sent a detailed information pack with information about organ donation, compiled by the NHS.
    (3) An individual may request the latest edition of such a pack of information from their relevant health professional at any time
    (4) People will have the option to receive all future information packs electronically.

    5: Extent, Commencement and Short Title
    (1) This Act extends to the United Kingdom.
    (2) The provisions of this Act come into force on 1st June 2017
    (3) This Act may be cited as the Organ Donation Act 2017.


    Notes
    Currently, 1000 people die in Britain each year because of organ shortages. It is estimated that almost all of these deaths could be prevented if there was a minor change in the system; making organ donation an opt out system rather than an opt in one. Under the current system, the main reason why people may not add themselves to the organ donor list is simply because they simply lack the time and motivation to do so.

    There are several reasons why people may object to donating their organs after they pass away, often due to their religion. If people do not wish to donate their organs when they die, they will be completely entitled to remove themselves from the Organ Donation Register without any cost concurred. Similar legislation is already in place in Wales and the British Medical Association claims that dozens of lives been saved as a result of it.

    An increase in the availability of deceased donor organs will massively reduce (if not entirely eliminate) the need for living donors (i.e. Kidney donors - the only type of organ donation between living people). Living donors can suffer a markedly reduced quality of life and whilst its a fantastic altruistic thing to do this would make such sacrifice less necessary.

    As the Department of Health has highlighted in its recent statement of intent, every household in the country will receive a leaflet that will explain what this piece of legislation means for their family, why organ donation is important, what an opt out system is, and when, should the bill pass, changes will begin to take effect. The leaflet will further explain how individuals can opt out of the system, should they wish. Costs for this particular process will be in the region of £9.3 million.


    Here are some articles related to this bill:
    https://www.theguardian.com/society/...t-organ-donor-
    system
    http://www.exeterexpressandecho.co.u...ail/story.html


    Changes for the previous version:
    Spoiler:
    Show




    - Added 2 exemptions.
    - Added section on 'Information'.
    - Added a definiton.
    - Expanded the notes.





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    Nay for reasons mentioned in previous thread- I mean this wouldn't work if some people who wouldn't usually put them on the register weren't on the register. People will just go with the default option.
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    Still no, for same reasons as previously.

    And no, I'm not going to bother re-typing them.
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    (Original post by LifeIsFine)
    Nay for reasons mentioned in previous thread- I mean this wouldn't work if some people who wouldn't usually put them on the register weren't on the register. People will just go with the default option.
    But the reason why people would go for the default option is why we should change the system.
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    I very much support the general principle though I have some concerns about specific points and whether this is a sufficiently robust bill when compared to the equivalent in Wales.
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    (2) Anyone who has previously opted out may will be able to opt back in via the normal procedure.



    U wot m8?
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    (Original post by Saracen's Fez)
    I very much support the general principle though I have some concerns about specific points and whether this is a sufficiently robust bill when compared to the equivalent in Wales.
    The bill lacks detail in the way described during the first reading.
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    (Original post by Quamquam123)
    But the reason why people would go for the default option is why we should change the system.
    So essentially, rather than having people not have an organ taking from their bodies by default (which is most likely what they would want given the fact that if they really did want to this bill wouldn't exist), you would have people have their organ taken from them by default? (which,for the previous reason is likely not to be what people would want)?
    While they are obviously quite on the same level, would be for a revival of the national service?
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    (Original post by Saracen's Fez)
    I very much support the general principle though I have some concerns about specific points and whether this is a sufficiently robust bill when compared to the equivalent in Wales.
    Wales is basically the go-between. If the reference is lost on you, a quick google should furnish you with an understanding.
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    (Original post by LifeIsFine)
    So essentially, rather than having people not have an organ taking from their bodies by default (which is most likely what they would want given the fact that if they really did want to this bill wouldn't exist), you would have people have their organ taken from them by default? (which,for the previous reason is likely not to be what people would want)?
    While they are obviously quite on the same level, would be for a revival of the national service?
    I'd assume that most people wouldn't mind at all about their organs being used to save lives. For those that do mind, probably religious people, they will easily be able to remove themsekves from the register.

    One issue that was particularly highlighted in the first reading was that people may be added to the register without realising. However, the Department of Health will commit £9.3m to ensure every UK citizen receives information about the legislation change. In addition to this, we have altered the bill so that people will be reminded about the legislation in the future when they turn 16 and when they turn 18.
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    (Original post by ByronicHero)
    Wales is basically the go-between. If the reference is lost on you, a quick google should furnish you with an understanding.
    I believe he knows quite a lot about that particular bill already.
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    Absolutely not .... the state has no right to pretty much nationalise people's organs .... they shoud not dictate what people do with their organs
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    (Original post by Quamquam123)
    I believe he knows quite a lot about that particular bill already.
    i'm sure he feels he does.
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    (Original post by Quamquam123)
    I'd assume that most people wouldn't mind at all about their organs being used to save lives. For those that do mind, probably religious people, they will easily be able to remove themsekves from the register.

    One issue that was particularly highlighted in the first reading was that people may be added to the register without realising. However, the Department of Health will commit £9.3m to ensure every UK citizen receives information about the legislation change. In addition to this, we have altered the bill so that people will be reminded about the legislation in the future when they turn 16 and when they turn 18.
    As for your second paragraph, I understand what you are saying.
    But for your first, why wouldn't people put themselves on the register if they really wanted to save lives? Why would "motivation" stop someone if they actually wanted to? If they've neither said yes or no, assuming it's automatically a yes and taking an organ
    from someone is not right in any way.

    While I seem quite defensive I could be swayed, just not by the arguments currently presented.
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    Nay. Same reasons as before.
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    (Original post by hazzer1998)
    Absolutely not .... the state has no right to pretty much nationalise people's organs .... they shoulook not dictate what people do with their organs
    What's a shoulook?
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    (Original post by Quamquam123)
    What's a shoulook?
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    Violation of civil liberties. It's a nay from me.
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    Abstain.

    I appreciate your efforts to make the option of opting out basically common knowledge and also making exemptions.

    However, I do still feel a bit iffy towards this on civil liberties grounds, can't really explain why but it just doesn't wash with my conscience to fully and openly support this.

    But, as I said, I do appreciate the concessions, hence the abstention.
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    As much as I support organ donation, I'm not keen on the State having the first dibs on your organs. I'll probably abstain.
 
 
 
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