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    I'm 16 and I'm being urged by school to seek a diagnosis. As long as I can remember, I have been different and I have a younger sister with ASD. When my sister was in the process of being diagnosed my mum mentioned to school (primary) that I have very similar behaviours but the school then said "she's too clever to have ASD" and so have gone through school really struggling in many ways. When it was mentioned to me again the other day I said I can't have it because I'm (somewhat) smart- this was based on my primary experience of being told this. I will list a few of my behaviours just for reference: I hate loud sounds (they make me so anxious and I have to get out of the room), I cannot stand being touched even if it's my hair, a single sound ie tapping takes over completely and I lose concentration of what I'm meant to be focusing on, I still won't eat certain foods because of their texture, I have receptive actions (hand flapping and pacing), I have awful motor skills (can't tie shoe laces, use a knife and fork and in general very clumsy), I walk with a bounce/twirl, my school attendance in sixth form is awful because I miss a lot of free period days because it worries and stresses me as there's little structure to the day, I know all my teachers number plates, I know most tennis statistics of the open era but can't actually watch the game/have no interest in watching it, I'm horrendous with change, I react inappropriately to most social situations (I laugh when a matter is serious or become very defensive), I'm very literal and black and white, I have 1 friend only, poor eye contact, can't keep conservation going, find it easier to communicate with people not my age, lack of empathy and need to be spoken to in a VERY simple way to understand people's point. All of those are things teachers have noticed by the way (they gave me a list and are persuading me to make a doctors appointment). Do you think a doctors appointment would be worth it? Does anyone have a story of getting diagnosed late teen?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I'm 16 and I'm being urged by school to seek a diagnosis. As long as I can remember, I have been different and I have a younger sister with ASD. When my sister was in the process of being diagnosed my mum mentioned to school (primary) that I have very similar behaviours but the school then said "she's too clever to have ASD" and so have gone through school really struggling in many ways. When it was mentioned to me again the other day I said I can't have it because I'm (somewhat) smart- this was based on my primary experience of being told this. I will list a few of my behaviours just for reference: I hate loud sounds (they make me so anxious and I have to get out of the room), I cannot stand being touched even if it's my hair, a single sound ie tapping takes over completely and I lose concentration of what I'm meant to be focusing on, I still won't eat certain foods because of their texture, I have receptive actions (hand flapping and pacing), I have awful motor skills (can't tie shoe laces, use a knife and fork and in general very clumsy), I walk with a bounce/twirl, my school attendance in sixth form is awful because I miss a lot of free period days because it worries and stresses me as there's little structure to the day, I know all my teachers number plates, I know most tennis statistics of the open era but can't actually watch the game/have no interest in watching it, I'm horrendous with change, I react inappropriately to most social situations (I laugh when a matter is serious or become very defensive), I'm very literal and black and white, I have 1 friend only, poor eye contact, can't keep conservation going, find it easier to communicate with people not my age, lack of empathy and need to be spoken to in a VERY simple way to understand people's point. All of those are things teachers have noticed by the way (they gave me a list and are persuading me to make a doctors appointment). Do you think a doctors appointment would be worth it? Does anyone have a story of getting diagnosed late teen?
    Diagnosed when I was 14 (mainly due to my own research). It has helped me with exam access arrangements for Sixth Form and university. I would highly recommend getting a diagnosis. If you want to ask me any questions, feel free.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Diagnosed when I was 14 (mainly due to my own research). It has helped me with exam access arrangements for Sixth Form and university. I would highly recommend getting a diagnosis. If you want to ask me any questions, feel free.
    How long/hard was the diagnostic process?
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    I was diagnosed at 23,

    It has nothing to do with being smart. I know a few who are very smart. Including a GP.

    You've described me a lot. Although I don't have your issue of repetitive behaviours.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    I was diagnosed at 23,

    It has nothing to do with being smart. I know a few who are very smart. Including a GP.

    You've described me a lot. Although I don't have your issue of repetitive behaviours.
    I know it's the same question as I asked the previous person but how long and hard was the diagnosis?
    Do they focus a lot on your younger childhood behaviour?
    And how do you actually initially approach a GP? (Do you just ask for a referral?)
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I'm 16 and I'm being urged by school to seek a diagnosis. As long as I can remember, I have been different and I have a younger sister with ASD. When my sister was in the process of being diagnosed my mum mentioned to school (primary) that I have very similar behaviours but the school then said "she's too clever to have ASD" and so have gone through school really struggling in many ways. When it was mentioned to me again the other day I said I can't have it because I'm (somewhat) smart- this was based on my primary experience of being told this. I will list a few of my behaviours just for reference: I hate loud sounds (they make me so anxious and I have to get out of the room), I cannot stand being touched even if it's my hair, a single sound ie tapping takes over completely and I lose concentration of what I'm meant to be focusing on, I still won't eat certain foods because of their texture, I have receptive actions (hand flapping and pacing), I have awful motor skills (can't tie shoe laces, use a knife and fork and in general very clumsy), I walk with a bounce/twirl, my school attendance in sixth form is awful because I miss a lot of free period days because it worries and stresses me as there's little structure to the day, I know all my teachers number plates, I know most tennis statistics of the open era but can't actually watch the game/have no interest in watching it, I'm horrendous with change, I react inappropriately to most social situations (I laugh when a matter is serious or become very defensive), I'm very literal and black and white, I have 1 friend only, poor eye contact, can't keep conservation going, find it easier to communicate with people not my age, lack of empathy and need to be spoken to in a VERY simple way to understand people's point. All of those are things teachers have noticed by the way (they gave me a list and are persuading me to make a doctors appointment). Do you think a doctors appointment would be worth it? Does anyone have a story of getting diagnosed late teen?
    Generally: It depends. A diagnosis does only help, in case you want help or want to know. It does not help, in case you can cope on your own already and don't want to be labelled. Hence, you have to think it through. For ASD diagnosis, you will find some blogs on the web describing the process of diagnosis. (! Of course, another diagnosis could come out at the end, too. Or no diagnosis at all.)

    Usually you would only look for diagnosis, in case you suffer from it, otherwise some psychatrists/psychotherapist will even advise against it, because in case you need no help, then it can do more harm, than good. (A bit simplified, but it can be true.)



    How hard is the diagnosis? Again, it depends. It is harder, in case you are not a textbook case, you may fall into other diagnoses as well and last but not least, how long it takes you to get to a specialist. A GP is usually not qualified enough and some psychotherapists more experienced than others. But anyway, most reasonable psychotherapist will take a couple of hours until giving you any diagnosis, because it can be a bit unfair towards the patient, to do all on the first encounter. (But that again depends on the whole process, there can be more than one involved.)

    And yes, asking your parents is often part of this.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I know it's the same question as I asked the previous person but how long and hard was the diagnosis?
    Do they focus a lot on your younger childhood behaviour?
    And how do you actually initially approach a GP? (Do you just ask for a referral?)
    The diagnosis took a total of 2 hours or so. I had 2 appointments which were a total of about 5 months apart. They focus a lot on your childhood. (most of which I don't remember) I just asked for a referral. I had to take a letter in with me, explaining why I believed I have the condition. It was explained me there's no treatment or cure (no-one had told me ever there's no help at all for adults) and some NHS trusts won't even diagnose adults.
 
 
 
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