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    Hi!
    I m doing As biology so i kinda need help . if a bio genious is reading this plz plz plz can u explain the four structures of protein packaging , thàt is primary, secondary,quartenary and tertiary, can u explain when and where it happens??
    Thannnnnnk uuuuu !!!
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    Hiya, it has been a while since I did this topic. So the best I can really do is copy in some bits from the essay I wrote on it. Hope this helps

    Primary: The primary structure of a protein is the simplest structure describing the sequence of amino acids in the polypeptide chain. Despite, the lengths of the protein chains, there will always be two functional groups present; an amino group (NH2) and a carboxylic group (COOH). Due to the high density of amino acid arrangement within the chain, it causes the structure to begin to fold or coil based on the hydrogen bonds that begin to form between said folds.

    Secondary: These folds and coils, that begin to occur, define whether that part of the molecule is an alpha or beta molecule. The two different arrangements can be distinguished through their unique structures. An α-helix chain, for example, causes the strand to curl in a spiral format with the reactive R-groups protruding the structure. This is due to hydrogen bonds forming between the oxygen of the C=O present in each peptide bond and the N-H group of another peptide bond lower down the sequence. Whereas, a β-pleated sheet means that the arrangement of amino acids is in slight folds with hydrogen bonds holding the pleated sheets together side by side; this is the result of the bonds forming between the adjacent carbonyl oxygens on each strand.

    Tertiary: Tertiary structure is equally important to add to the complexity of the protein. It is the simplest form of 3D representation of the structure. To achieve a good stability within the molecule, the structure will contain spirals and folds whilst twisting to also help achieve lowest energy state. This state is undergone through the use of much stronger bonds forming throughout the molecule due to the attraction between the alpha helices and beta pleats.

    Quaternary: Quaternary structure is the last and more complex of the organisational appearances, using both 2D and 3D representations to form the finished protein. To further sub categorise the structure, the protein can be classed as either a globular or fibrous molecule. Globular molecules are much more compact and rounded compared to that of fibrous molecular structures as they are good for transport of substances, such as oxygen.
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    (Original post by NightPerson)
    Hiya, it has been a while since I did this topic. So the best I can really do is copy in some bits from the essay I wrote on it. Hope this helps

    Primary: The primary structure of a protein is the simplest structure describing the sequence of amino acids in the polypeptide chain. Despite, the lengths of the protein chains, there will always be two functional groups present; an amino group (NH2) and a carboxylic group (COOH). Due to the high density of amino acid arrangement within the chain, it causes the structure to begin to fold or coil based on the hydrogen bonds that begin to form between said folds.

    Secondary: These folds and coils, that begin to occur, define whether that part of the molecule is an alpha or beta molecule. The two different arrangements can be distinguished through their unique structures. An α-helix chain, for example, causes the strand to curl in a spiral format with the reactive R-groups protruding the structure. This is due to hydrogen bonds forming between the oxygen of the C=O present in each peptide bond and the N-H group of another peptide bond lower down the sequence. Whereas, a β-pleated sheet means that the arrangement of amino acids is in slight folds with hydrogen bonds holding the pleated sheets together side by side; this is the result of the bonds forming between the adjacent carbonyl oxygens on each strand.

    Tertiary: Tertiary structure is equally important to add to the complexity of the protein. It is the simplest form of 3D representation of the structure. To achieve a good stability within the molecule, the structure will contain spirals and folds whilst twisting to also help achieve lowest energy state. This state is undergone through the use of much stronger bonds forming throughout the molecule due to the attraction between the alpha helices and beta pleats.

    Quaternary: Quaternary structure is the last and more complex of the organisational appearances, using both 2D and 3D representations to form the finished protein. To further sub categorise the structure, the protein can be classed as either a globular or fibrous molecule. Globular molecules are much more compact and rounded compared to that of fibrous molecular structures as they are good for transport of substances, such as oxygen.
    Thank u sooooo mucccchhhh fr the help ,
 
 
 
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