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Size:  20.7 KBHi, for this question I don't understand how the mass of water is worked out. I have constructed an equation for it because I don't think this is necessary in a way... So at the end the product we have has 2 water molecule going from the starting product with 0.5 water molecule only. The answer is to simply multiply the n of plaster by 1.5. I don't quite get this, because this is not really the mole ratio though...Attachment 615024615022

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    Surely the PoP needs 1.5 mol of water!!!!1
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    (Original post by Pigster)
    Surely the PoP needs 1.5 mol of water!!!!1
    1.5 number of hydrogen is different to 1.5 moles surely? If there is 1.5 moles, then you will have more oxygen as a result... I am not following... Thanks
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    Each mol of PoP contains 1/2 mol of H2O.

    Each mol of set PoP contains 2 mol of H2O.
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    (Original post by Pigster)
    Each mol of PoP contains 1/2 mol of H2O.

    Each mol of set PoP contains 2 mol of H2O.
    So you are suggesting that the plaster reacts with 1.5 lots of water?
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    (Original post by coconut64)
    Help?
    I can't really add much to the previous comments.

    It seems to me that you don't understand the concept of hydrated salts.

    The "dot" between the formula and the water molecules means that the water (usually called water of crystallisation) is associated with the crystal structure in a ratio which is given by the coefficient (big number) in front of the water formula.

    CuSO4.5H2O

    This means that for every copper sulfate formula unit there are 5 associated water molecules. These molecules are used in building the crystal lattice (hence water of crystallisation)

    Now if you multiply the whole formula up by Avogadro's number it then becomes 1 mole of hydrated copper(II) sulfate in which every 1 mole of copper(II) sulfate is associated with 5 moles of water molecules.

    If you heat 1 mole of hydrated copper(II) sulfate strongly you will get 1 mole of copper(II) sulfate (anhydrous) and 5 moles of water given off as steam.

    CuSO4.5H2O --> CuSO4 + 5H2O

    Now apply these ideas to YOUR problem.

    There are two forms of calcium sulfate:

    CaSO4.0.5H2O
    and
    CaSO4.2H2O

    What do you have to give to the first to get the second?
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    (Original post by charco)
    I can't really add much to the previous comments.

    It seems to me that you don't understand the concept of hydrated salts.

    The "dot" between the formula and the water molecules means that the water (usually called water of crystallisation) is associated with the crystal structure in a ratio which is given by the coefficient (big number) in front of the water formula.

    CuSO4.5H2O

    This means that for every copper sulfate formula unit there are 5 associated water molecules. These molecules are used in building the crystal lattice (hence water of crystallisation)

    Now if you multiply the whole formula up by Avogadro's number it then becomes 1 mole of hydrated copper(II) sulfate in which every 1 mole of copper(II) sulfate is associated with 5 moles of water molecules.

    If you heat 1 mole of hydrated copper(II) sulfate strongly you will get 1 mole of copper(II) sulfate (anhydrous) and 5 moles of water given off as steam.

    CuSO4.5H2O --> CuSO4 + 5H2O

    Now apply these ideas to YOUR problem.

    There are two forms of calcium sulfate:

    CaSO4.0.5H2O
    and
    CaSO4.2H2O

    What do you have to give to the first to get the second?
    Thanks, I know what you mean now. So if there is 2CaSO4.0.5H2O, does it mean I have 1 mole of water in total? Thanks
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    (Original post by coconut64)
    Thanks, I know what you mean now. So if there is 2CaSO4.0.5H2O, does it mean I have 1 mole of water in total? Thanks
    yes
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    (Original post by charco)
    I can't really add much to the previous comments.
    I'd have loved to have seen how long the response that DID "add much to the previous comments" would have been.

 
 
 
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