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    My programming skills are not the best and I find it difficult but I really enjoy the development and designing for example flowcharts and pseudocode, also logical thinking.
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    (Original post by adnanuddin233)
    My programming skills are not the best and I find it difficult but I really enjoy the development and designing for example flowcharts and pseudocode, also logical thinking.
    No you don't have to be good at programming - I was never good at programming pre university and even though I got a First Class Honours in the same discipline as the one you wish to apply to - I am still not good at programming.
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    Not at all. They teach you from scratch.
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    (Original post by yunglife)
    No you don't have to be good at programming - I was never good at programming pre university and even though I got a First Class Honours in the same discipline as the one you wish to apply to - I am still not good at programming.
    Great so are you good at maths? What uni did you go
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    (Original post by adnanuddin233)
    Great so are you good at maths? What uni did you go
    I wouldn't say that I am overly good at Maths - I don't really see a huge correlation between Maths and programming. I know a lot of good programmers who are not necessarily overly good at Mathematics. I think the basics even up to GCSE (a plus) would be sufficient. With regards to university, I went to a top 50 university in the UK. It was good academic wise and job prospects wise - but socially it was just $hit.
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    Nope. I knew nothing about programming, didn't even do IT/Computing/Computer Science at A-Level and I was just fine at uni.
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    Not really. It's more theoretical.
    Most of compsci grads can't even program anyway.
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    (Original post by yunglife)
    I wouldn't say that I am overly good at Maths - I don't really see a huge correlation between Maths and programming. I know a lot of good programmers who are not necessarily overly good at Mathematics. I think the basics even up to GCSE (a plus) would be sufficient. With regards to university, I went to a top 50 university in the UK. It was good academic wise and job prospects wise - but socially it was just $hit.
    Does computer science require a lot of maths?
    I'm absolutely terrible at maths.
    My target for GCSE is a scale 6 (B), yet for my mocks, I got 20%, 50/240, which is a U. However, i'm the best programmer in my school and have been doing so for years (LUA, Unity3d, Python), so would I pull it off?
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    (Original post by Carthaginian)
    Not really. It's more theoretical.
    Most of compsci grads can't even program anyway.
    I really hope that's not as true as you're implying, because I hate theory, but love actually programming.

    Not really sure why you would bother with Comp Sci if you don't want to do any actual programming. If you just want to do design work, surely you'd be better off with the more Business-focused degrees or Computer Games Design.

    Though I'm going to be doing Software Engineering, so perhaps that'll be more practical than Comp Sci.
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    (Original post by Jazzyboy)
    I really hope that's not as true as you're implying, because I hate theory, but love actually programming.

    Not really sure why you would bother with Comp Sci if you don't want to do any actual programming. If you just want to do design work, surely you'd be better off with the more Business-focused degrees or Computer Games Design.

    Though I'm going to be doing Software Engineering, so perhaps that'll be more practical than Comp Sci.
    Exactly. I want to program apps, sites, games... Not damn 3d engines which require a crap ton of maths. So exactly which uni do you want to go to?
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    (Original post by Carthaginian)
    Not really. It's more theoretical.
    Most of compsci grads can't even program anyway.
    Yeah this subject is quite theoretical - however depending on your university you can choose modules in your final year of study. I picked some business modules in my final year to help me understand how IT is really used in industry.

    With regards to most compsci grads not being able to code - it does apply to at least 60% of grads to be fair including myself. I am not like an amazing programmer but I love learning and implementing solutions.
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    This thread makes my eyes bleed, can't believe what I'm seeing.

    If you take Computer Science, you should expect Math and Programming to be involved, these elements are kind of the staples of 95% of all Comp Sci courses.
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    (Original post by Carthaginian)
    Exactly. I want to program apps, sites, games... Not damn 3d engines which require a crap ton of maths. So exactly which uni do you want to go to?
    Don't know yet. Either Aberystwyth or Swansea. (or maybe Leicester)

    I'm not bothered about the maths aspect personally, or having to program 3d engines. That actually sounds quite fun. I just want to be doing some actual programming, not just theorising about programming. (yeah, I'm the kind of weirdo that actually enjoys maths, I'm afraid, so I can't quite sympathise with you)
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    I would not say so. Computer science is much more than simply programming skills. There's a great deal of mathematics and non-programming options. The recommendation I was given by an aquaintance who just completed his PhD is that you should have sound numerical skills and read some of the core reading for first year.
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    (Original post by Aceadria)
    I would not say so. Computer science is much more than simply programming skills. There's a great deal of mathematics and non-programming options. The recommendation I was given by an aquaintance who just completed his PhD is that you should have sound numerical skills and read some of the core reading for first year.
    Exactly, Math has ALOT to do with comp sci (which is why theres always math modules involved), things like set theory, sequences, finite state machines, regular expressions, these are all programming concepts which are core to understanding most thing programming that aren't trivial.

    If you sign up for a Comp Sci course, its 3 years of your life that you need to be 100% informed on what sort of things you will be dealing with, better to know before you feel you made a mistake partway through your course, as going to Uni is an expensive decision.
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    (Original post by loooopppyyy)
    If you sign up for a Comp Sci course, its 3 years of your life that you need to be 100% informed on what sort of things you will be dealing with, better to know before you feel you made a mistake partway through your course, as going to Uni is an expensive decision.
    I really want to reiterate this point. Computer science is a tough degree and requires a great deal of dedication. I've seen a lot of undergraduates go into it thinking it's going to allow them to be the next Zuckerberg but the fact of the matter is that you need to realise what computer science really is. If you simply want to program or code, I would recommend looking at a coding boot camp, which is often cheaper and faster. But if you're interested in problem-solving, logic and gaining a better understanding of the field as a whole, then perhaps reading for a degree in CompSci is a sound choice.
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    (Original post by adnanuddin233)
    My programming skills are not the best and I find it difficult but I really enjoy the development and designing for example flowcharts and pseudocode, also logical thinking.
    I was reasonable before uni, but they teach from scratch so it makes no difference - there's people in my year who hadn't advanced from using word before uni.

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    (Original post by Carthaginian)
    Does computer science require a lot of maths?
    I'm absolutely terrible at maths.
    My target for GCSE is a scale 6 (B), yet for my mocks, I got 20%, 50/240, which is a U. However, i'm the best programmer in my school and have been doing so for years (LUA, Unity3d, Python), so would I pull it off?
    As far as I'm aware, most comp sci courses ask for a B in A-level maths.

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    (Original post by loooopppyyy)
    This thread makes my eyes bleed, can't believe what I'm seeing.

    If you take Computer Science, you should expect Math and Programming to be involved, these elements are kind of the staples of 95% of all Comp Sci courses.
    It will be involved, but that's not the same as needing to be good at it before going! Most unis will teach you from scratch.

    In all honesty, you could get by without being 'good' at it during the course, as long as you had half decent marks; there are plenty of other modules you can bring your scores up with!
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    (Original post by Andy98)
    As far as I'm aware, most comp sci courses ask for a B in A-level maths.

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    Most ask for a B in GCSE Maths, only like 10-15 ask for A-level maths (usually A/A*).

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