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    (Original post by shadowdweller)
    It will be involved, but that's not the same as needing to be good at it before going! Most unis will teach you from scratch.

    In all honesty, you could get by without being 'good' at it during the course, as long as you had half decent marks; there are plenty of other modules you can bring your scores up with!
    Yes also true, I was just trying to provide information on what to expect, the majority of posts in this thread hint at no math being involved in Computer Science, when the reverse is true

    If you hate Math, you will most likely hate Computer Science.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Most ask for a B in GCSE Maths, only like 10-15 ask for A-level maths (usually A/A*).

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    Fair enough, my memory ain't too great
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    (Original post by loooopppyyy)
    Yes also true, I was just trying to provide information on what to expect, the majority of posts in this thread hint at no math being involved in Computer Science, when the reverse is true

    If you hate Math, you will most likely hate Computer Science.
    Also true, excellent point!

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    (Original post by Carthaginian)
    Does computer science require a lot of maths?
    I'm absolutely terrible at maths.
    My target for GCSE is a scale 6 (B), yet for my mocks, I got 20%, 50/240, which is a U. However, i'm the best programmer in my school and have been doing so for years (LUA, Unity3d, Python), so would I pull it off?
    Yes, Mathematics plays a HUGE role in Computer Science... if you don't want to do any maths, you may be better suited to Software Engineering - however please note that this will also have Mathematical concepts in it (e.g. big O notation).

    Trying to do a computer science degree at a good university while being rubbish at maths is literally impossible. Sorry
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    (Original post by COMPSCIKING111)
    Yes, Mathematics plays a HUGE role in Computer Science... if you don't want to do any maths, you may be better suited to Software Engineering - however please note that this will also have Mathematical concepts in it (e.g. big O notation).

    Trying to do a computer science degree at a good university while being rubbish at maths is literally impossible. Sorry
    I'd argue it's a different kind of maths to what you do at gcse though?

    Being terrible at math in general would make it very difficult, but it's worth looking at the computing side of maths first!

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    Sort of but not entirely. Contrary to common belief, programming does not make a majority portion of the CS. First year students doing CS at my uni have a single programming unit worth 40 credits, with 20 credit units in Web, Networking, Databases and Computer Architecture.

    For second year it would look like around half the units are programming related, however they aren't all directly programming (for example software development).

    It's entirely possible to do CS and programming without being amazing at Maths. Yes, it's necessary but at the most basic level it won't get more difficult than basic operations, indicies and so on. If you want to go into a CS you don't have to focus on programming and maths. People seem to assume that CS is the main computer related to degree, then assume it is purely programming related. However there are many other aspects such as networking, web design, graphical work, security, business and so on.

    CS does tend to focus the most on programming. That's the precise reason I didn't do CS. However that doesn't mean it'll be exclusively programming, especially when you start having options for different units in your later years.
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    (Original post by Carthaginian)
    Does computer science require a lot of maths?
    I'm absolutely terrible at maths.
    My target for GCSE is a scale 6 (B), yet for my mocks, I got 20%, 50/240, which is a U. However, i'm the best programmer in my school and have been doing so for years (LUA, Unity3d, Python), so would I pull it off?
    depends where you apply. a university like oxbridge/edinburgh/icl is going to have lots of maths.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Sort of but not entirely. Contrary to common belief, programming does not make a majority portion of the CS. First year students doing CS at my uni have a single programming unit worth 40 credits, with 20 credit units in Web, Networking, Databases and Computer Architecture.

    For second year it would look like around half the units are programming related, however they aren't all directly programming (for example software development).

    It's entirely possible to do CS and programming without being amazing at Maths. Yes, it's necessary but at the most basic level it won't get more difficult than basic operations, indicies and so on. If you want to go into a CS you don't have to focus on programming and maths. People seem to assume that CS is the main computer related to degree, then assume it is purely programming related. However there are many other aspects such as networking, web design, graphical work, security, business and so on.

    CS does tend to focus the most on programming. That's the precise reason I didn't do CS. However that doesn't mean it'll be exclusively programming, especially when you start having options for different units in your later years.
    I think its dependant where you go, our first year consists of;
    Mathematics module (set theory, trees, graphs, finite state machines, propositional logc etc etc).
    Studio1 module (Unix Bash programming and creating an application using Android Studio).
    Project1 module (a group programming module where we need to conceptualise and build an app using any programming language we want),
    Software Design and Development double module (Java programming, Junit testing and UML).
    Hardware and Networks (number bases, binary, floating point binary, 1GL opcodes and networking).

    I think its safe to say our Computing Science course is heavily focused on programming and Math.
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    (Original post by loooopppyyy)
    I think its dependant where you go, our first year consists of;
    Mathematics module (set theory, trees, graphs, finite state machines, propositional logc etc etc).
    Studio1 module (Unix Bash programming and creating an application using Android Studio).
    Project1 module (a group programming module where we need to conceptualise and build an app using any programming language we want),
    Software Design and Development double module (Java programming, Junit testing and UML).
    Hardware and Networks (number bases, binary, floating point binary, 1GL opcodes and networking).

    I think its safe to say our Computing Science course is heavily focused on programming and Math.
    Absolutely, it depends on the university as well. Obviously if you go somewhere programming heavy then you'll need to be good at it (or learn to be good). But in the broader perspective, you don't need to be good at programming for computer science. It doesn't hurt to be good, but you don't have to be great to do well, unless you chose to go to a programming focused uni.

    That said, if you aren't focused on programming and would prefer to do something else then I'd recommend taking a more specialised degree. If for example someone wanted to do networking then I'd recommend a networking degree over CS.

    CS isn't all programming and the actual amount varies from uni to uni but if you aren't looking to go into programming in the first place then I'd recommend steering more towards a course that caters where you want to go. I for example would never pick your course, as varied and interesting as it sounds, because I don't have a huge interest in programming. Instead I'd pick a course that's better suited.

    So really if the OP doesn't want to do programming, they can still do CS but should consider what other options they have. Networking, security/forensics, hardware design (electornic side of things), graphics and so on are all viable degree choices.
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    (Original post by loooopppyyy)
    Exactly, Math has ALOT to do with comp sci (which is why theres always math modules involved), things like set theory, sequences, finite state machines, regular expressions, these are all programming concepts which are core to understanding most thing programming that aren't trivial.

    If you sign up for a Comp Sci course, its 3 years of your life that you need to be 100% informed on what sort of things you will be dealing with, better to know before you feel you made a mistake partway through your course, as going to Uni is an expensive decision.
    i picked computer science , and now i regret it, my mind is more creative based rather logical
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    (Original post by Carthaginian)
    Does computer science require a lot of maths?
    I'm absolutely terrible at maths.
    My mum says you will be a **** programist if you aren't good at maths/don't understand it. Having said that, my boyfriend isn't a mathematical genius and does quite well on his CompSci degree
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    (Original post by Nottie)
    My mum says you will be a **** programist if you aren't good at maths/don't understand it. Having said that, my boyfriend isn't a mathematical genius and does quite well on his CompSci degree
    What year is he in if you don't mind me asking?

    Only asking as the first year is probably the least dependant on Math, when you get into advanced AI modules and stuff, not being good at Math might make these much tougher!
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    (Original post by Carthaginian)
    Does computer science require a lot of maths?
    I'm absolutely terrible at maths.
    My target for GCSE is a scale 6 (B), yet for my mocks, I got 20%, 50/240, which is a U. However, i'm the best programmer in my school and have been doing so for years (LUA, Unity3d, Python), so would I pull it off?
    You don't need an A level in Maths or any preliminary education above GCSE level to go to a good university to read Computer Science. However at university they may teach you the maths related to CompSci which would later feed into specific modules in years 2 and 3/4 of your degree.
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    I'm doing computer science at university and been programming for 3+ years but I suck at maths past GCSE level. Programming doesn't require much more than basic maths unless it's algorithms and the specific ones you need get taught in lectures.
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    (Original post by Killerpenguin15)
    You don't need an A level in Maths or any preliminary education above GCSE level to go to a good university to read Computer Science. However at university they may teach you the maths related to CompSci which would later feed into specific modules in years 2 and 3/4 of your degree.
    I think you actually do for comp sci, you're thinking of software engineering.
    A Levels AAB including Maths
    https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/prospect...do?id=G4022017
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    (Original post by loooopppyyy)
    I think you actually do for comp sci, you're thinking of software engineering.
    A Levels AAB including Maths
    https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/prospect...do?id=G4022017
    It depends on what uni you go to. Plenty of the high up universities don't ask for A level maths. Only GCSE maths at a certain level like at least a B
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    (Original post by loooopppyyy)
    I think you actually do for comp sci, you're thinking of software engineering.
    A Levels AAB including Maths
    https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/prospect...do?id=G4022017
    No, i'm thinking of Computer Science. I know because I study Computer Science at a top 50 university which doesn't require A level maths. And I have an AS level in Maths.

    http://beta.www.hull.ac.uk/Study/UG/...r-science.aspx

    That's not to say you will completely avoid doing maths during CompSci at degree level - It is pretty much essential to any good Computer Science course.
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    (Original post by Killerpenguin15)
    No, i'm thinking of Computer Science. I know because I study Computer Science at a top 50 university which doesn't require A level maths. And I have an AS level in Maths.

    http://beta.www.hull.ac.uk/Study/UG/...r-science.aspx

    That's not to say you will completely avoid doing maths during CompSci at degree level - It is pretty much essential to any good Computer Science course.
    That's gone down

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    (Original post by study beats)
    i picked computer science , and now i regret it, my mind is more creative based rather logical
    Sometimes I regret it too. The logical part of programming is mind boring numbing at times.

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    (Original post by Andy98)
    That's gone down

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    What do you mean? Uni of Hull is something like, 39th on the league table, last time I checked?

    Maybe top 40 University then
 
 
 
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