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Do teachers find 'emotionally needy' students annoying? Watch

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    If a student wishes to seek life advice from their teacher, because they feel like they can trust them, will the teacher feel annoyed? Would they see it as 'wasting their time'?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    If a student wishes to seek life advice from their teacher, because they feel like they can trust them, will the teacher feel annoyed? Would they see it as 'wasting their time'?
    Only a teacher can answer for his or herself. I myself have had both supportive and unsupportive teachers.
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    Our form teacher is always trying to get us to open up, but we're emotionally constipated as heck. Some are just more supportive and emotionally invested than others.

    I don't know why a teacher would be annoyed unless the teacher offers good advice that the student refuses to take, or something like that...
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    There is a world of difference between asking for life advice and being 'emotionally needy'. It's appropriate to ask for advice on occasion, but if it's frequent, or if the student is ignoring the advice and going round in circles then it would be better to get support from someone like a counsellor or mentor.


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    Every teacher is different. To me it wouldn't make sense as to why seeking support would be emotionally needy. The relationship is a professional one and not something more, which in your case I assume is the former.
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    Teacher's job is to teach. Most schools employ teaching support assistants, they'd be more appropriate to turn to for help unrelated to school work
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    A good teacher will always be willing to listen to and support a student, be that in strictly academic matters or more generally. A teacher might feel that the student's needs are such that they would be better dealt with by student services or their tutor, but if the child trusts the teacher enough to 'open up', then it would be unusual for that teacher not to be receptive to it. I certainly don't think it would be considered 'annoying', no.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    If a student wishes to seek life advice from their teacher, because they feel like they can trust them, will the teacher feel annoyed? Would they see it as 'wasting their time'?
    A supportive teacher with good emotional and social intelligence, and who genuinely cares would be more than happy to do this. However, the majority of teachers I have encountered aren't like this.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    If a student wishes to seek life advice from their teacher, because they feel like they can trust them, will the teacher feel annoyed? Would they see it as 'wasting their time'?
    It depends on the individual but I've had my biology teachers talk to me last week and tell me that I can talk to them about anything and their here to support me and be sensitive, whereas my chemistry teacher just jokes around but doesn't really care about anyone's feelings as much. I doubt they would find you 'annoying' unless it's affecting behaviour and becoming hard to handle. 😶
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    If a student wishes to seek life advice from their teacher, because they feel like they can trust them, will the teacher feel annoyed? Would they see it as 'wasting their time'?
    Like people have previously said it depends on the teacher in question.

    If you have someone whose job is also about emotional support such as a guidance counsellor or form tutor then maybe speak to them as they are more likely to be receptive.

    Personally, I don't think asking for advice could ever be seen as a 'waste of time'. It's one human supporting another and I would find it odd if someone was dismissive of this but who knows what people are thinking.
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    Depends on the teacher and the extent. Asking for advice and being emotionally needy are two different things. Students who are very clingy and constantly seeking advice/support for every fall out with friends, boy problem, and any other minor issue are likely to annoy teachers as it's hard to draw boundaries without upsetting the student (and I'm talking the sort of person who needs to talk every day/multiple times a day here). But many teachers are happy to offer you some support and advice if you are having problems.
 
 
 
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