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I don't know what I want to study at university; what can I do? Watch

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    I'm in year 12, and I'm taking maths, further maths, physics, chemistry and English literature (and EPQ). My favourite subject is maths, so I'm thinking about studying for a maths degree, but what are the future options after that? What else can I study, if not maths? I don't really have something in the future I'd really like to do. Is a maths degree worthwhile?
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    Why are you taking 5 subjects?
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    Surf online until you find a course you want to study.
    Yes, maths is probably worthwhile, why? because if you look at this http://www.thecompleteuniversityguid...raduates-earn/ it has a nice starting salary/
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    I'm in year 12, and I'm taking maths, further maths, physics, chemistry and English literature (and EPQ). My favourite subject is maths, so I'm thinking about studying for a maths degree, but what are the future options after that? What else can I study, if not maths? I don't really have something in the future I'd really like to do. Is a maths degree worthwhile?
    You have a great combination of choices there.
    Maths is a great subject, but even if you're not too keen on maths at degree level, you could always go into engineering or physics (they're very mathematical) or even chemistry or something in between. You could even apply for something like economics as it is quite mathematical at uni, and maths, FM, and physics are very respected for top uni econ degrees. Your options are wide open.
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    (Original post by BigMan Ting)
    Why are you taking 5 subjects?
    I got 14 A* grades at GCSE, so why not? My school is fine with it.

    (Original post by Xiep)
    Surf online until you find a course you want to study.
    Yes, maths is probably worthwhile, why? because if you look at this http://www.thecompleteuniversityguid...raduates-earn/ it has a nice starting salary/
    Thanks, that's a great link. I just don't want to study something then realise the prospects aren't as great as I thought/as they used to be. A nice starting salary is very important to me.

    (Original post by aminoff)
    You have a great combination of choices there.
    Maths is a great subject, but even if you're not too keen on maths at degree level, you could always go into engineering or physics (they're very mathematical) or even chemistry or something in between. You could even apply for something like economics as it is quite mathematical at uni, and maths, FM, and physics are very respected for top uni econ degrees. Your options are wide open.
    Thanks for reassuring me I have a lot of options. In terms of employment, money and enoyability, what would you go for. I love maths but don't want to find out it's a really restricting degree choice.
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    There are several. Maths, physics, engineering, chemistry, computer science, etc. all jump to mind.
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    You're in year 12 ... don't be too stressed about this now because chances are you will change your mind a million times between now and next January (when the next UCAS deadline is). For now, just focus on your AS Levels, and worry about degree choices over summer.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    I got 14 A* grades at GCSE, so why not? My school is fine with it.
    I'm only saying that you should wait until year 13 to find what you're really interested in and then make a decision on what you'd like to study. Don't think about employment now, it only serves as a distraction imo
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    What is the use of English? Remove it. And proof of your GCSE grades XD
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    look at things you enjoy, or what fascinates you. With great qualifications like those, you can do almost anything. Normally you would think that your degrees effect what you can and cant do, but employers are actually just looking at your degrees to see if you are capable of applying thought to your work. for a uni course you want to choose something you are interested in, if you have further math then they'll probably accept you, especially if you have English and a science.
    Hope that helps! Tx
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    (Original post by LisaNikita)
    What is the use of English? Remove it. And proof of your GCSE grades XD
    I know not to start a sentence with a connective; that's one use right there. English has many uses, I'm saying that while also taking the big four science subjects.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    I know not to start a sentence with a connective; that's one use right there. English has many uses, I'm saying that while also taking the big four science subjects.
    Do you go to a private school? Ask your teachers they can give you extra UCAS points through this Cambridge English exam. Its basically an A-level but it serves as a qualification for CV's.
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    (Original post by Loopy91)
    You're in year 12 ... don't be too stressed about this now because chances are you will change your mind a million times between now and next January (when the next UCAS deadline is). For now, just focus on your AS Levels, and worry about degree choices over summer.
    (Original post by BigMan Ting)
    I'm only saying that you should wait until year 13 to find what you're really interested in and then make a decision on what you'd like to study. Don't think about employment now, it only serves as a distraction imo
    You're both right, thanks. I guess I'm one of those people who feels like they have to have a plan all the time. I know I want to do something involving maths.

    (Original post by Tsukio)
    look at things you enjoy, or what fascinates you. With great qualifications like those, you can do almost anything. Normally you would think that your degrees effect what you can and cant do, but employers are actually just looking at your degrees to see if you are capable of applying thought to your work. for a uni course you want to choose something you are interested in, if you have further math then they'll probably accept you, especially if you have English and a science.
    Hope that helps! Tx
    Thanks, that's great advice. Maths fascinates me, but I'm unsure what type of maths, physics or engineering I'd really want to do.

    (Original post by LisaNikita)
    Do you go to a private school? Ask your teachers they can give you extra UCAS points through this Cambridge English exam. Its basically an A-level but it serves as a qualification for CV's.
    Yes I go to a private school. I've never heard of that, what do universities think about it and is it worth doing?
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    Thanks, that's great advice. Maths fascinates me, but I'm unsure what type of maths, physics or engineering I'd really want to do.

    Well it depends, you seem to excel in scientific and mathematical subjects, so you could maybe go for something rarer like Cryptology, or maybe something better known but exciting anyways like aeronautical engineering.
    Honestly though, whatever you want to do you'll probably be able to do. But id agree with some of the others, take the year to look at different paths, and to maybe even get work experience, which will not only make you more employable but you'll be able to see what foes on behind the scenes.
    Good luck! Tx
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    Read these
    https://www.oxford-royale.co.uk/arti...-article-ezine
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    I got 14 A* grades at GCSE, so why not? My school is fine with it.
    Because universities only make offers on the best 3 A Levels, in most cases anyway. You are just making more unnecessary work for yourself - it will be easier to do well in 3 a levels because you have more time to study for them. It doesn't matter how able you are, doing more than 3 A Levels won't put you at a significant advantage, even if you got five A* grades, because 3 A*s and other variables are just as good too.
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    You say you like to plan, so research different career paths with a maths degree (or engineering or physics) - maybe start with this list, and try to find accounts of what it's like to work in different jobs (googling "Actuarial analyst a day in the life" shows this result, amongst others.) Have a think about the type of work you'd be doing in each role, what the "busy work" looks like, if you're likely to be working on similar tasks every day, and the environment you'd be in. Also consider career prospects, average annual pay, and how much each role is likely to change over the course of your career (will promotions mean that your responsibilities are now to manage aspects of a business and its employees, rather than using your technical skills in a typical day, and are you okay with that?)

    Essentially, consider what a maths degree (or engineering or physics) will qualify you for, and whether or not you'd like to work in those roles. Maybe you'll find something you're really interested in and that could be the tiebreaker for what you'd like to study.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    Thanks for reassuring me I have a lot of options. In terms of employment, money and enoyability, what would you go for. I love maths but don't want to find out it's a really restricting degree choice.
    I'd recommend taking the engineering route, as you can enter many industries (oil, software engineering, banking, the list is endless) with an engineering degree from a reputable uni.
    Not sure how interested in econ you are but that would also give you great employment prospects if from a great uni e.g Oxbridge, LSE, Warwick..etc.
    Pure maths at uni is a bit different as it involves a lot of proofs and less maths problems, from what I've heard (I have a friend at Cambridge doing maths), so you might enjoy engineering or physics more. These would still give you fantastic employment prospects.

    Also I might agree with the other people about dropping English, cause I have a suspicion that you'd be a good candidate for Oxbridge, so unless you can get your UMS high enough for 5A*s, don't let one subject drag down your UMS for your other subjects.
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    Have a look at the degrees that Imperial College offers to give you ideas. They are all full of maths, and it might give you a sense of whether you are drawn more to banking/accountancy/statistics, or engineering/computer science. If you decide on engineering, the first two years are the same for most programmes, so you don't have to choose which specialism to go on to at first.


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