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    (Original post by Athematica)
    It's how Warwick describes it on their MORSE course info. It's about optimizations in discrete maths, most of the time, and relates to business etc. so in that sense it is modern mathematics.
    there MORSE course looks very attractive at first sight and easier to get into then their maths course.

    However Its not a maths degree is it? and It isn't fully math really is it?

    I wouldnt have a maths degree when I graduated from that would I?
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    note their maths and stats degree I could write all the same comments for.

    so same applies for that as well.
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    (Original post by Luke7456)
    there MORSE course looks very attractive at first sight and easier to get into then their maths course.

    However Its not a maths degree is it? and It isn't fully math really is it?

    I wouldnt have a maths degree when I graduated from that would I?
    Does that matter to you and for what reason?
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    (Original post by Athematica)
    Does that matter to you and for what reason?
    yes and for a few reasons. Firstly I wont actually have a Maths degree which is what i want. However more important then the name are other factors.

    I mean for A level maths what has become apparent is that I understand the stuff well enough to do well in exams but dont have the fundemental understanding I would like.

    Kind of like I understand what to do and how to apply it but I dont always understand why I am doing what I am doing. A level Maths is widely regarded to be very easy and simplistic when Compared to the STEP Exams you have to understand the math in a much greater depth. as would be the case for a Maths degree vs a Morse degree I assume?

    I dont just want to understand the math on a superficial level I want to actually grasp it on a fundamental level and the impression i get is the Maths degree will offer this to a much greater extent.

    It will also affect my Opportunities in Jobs will it not? surely a Maths degree is more valuable then some other degree that looks like bits and pieces of this and that.?

    further I am quite likely to want to go into further study Masters PHD possibly beyond doesn't not having a full Maths degree limit my options in this regard?

    and if it doesn't does this mean I will be less competent then those with the full Maths degree putting me at a disadvantage when I start?
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    (Original post by Luke7456)
    it seems everyone and their dog knows the big four universities for Maths in this country are Cambridge Oxford Imperial College and Warwick.

    However whatever happens next year I will find myself applying for at least two universities outside of these four. Since we can only choose one from Oxbridge and we have five choices. Hopefully it will only be two outside these 3 but we time will answer that.

    I am sure some people would disagree with me but if I had to assemble a top 15 not including these four I would come up with

    This isn't intended to be in any particular order of rank but obviously I thought of more of the better universities first. A notable omission is LSE I don't count them because as far as I am aware they don't do a straight Maths course it is always combined with something else.
    I am just wondering where people would rank these universities. I also missed out Southampton and York do you think that is fair or do you think they are better then some of the universities I have mentioned?

    1. Durham
    2. St Andrews
    3. Bristol
    4. Bath
    5. Edinburgh
    6. Nottingham
    7. UCL
    8. Glasgow
    9. Exeter
    10. Newcastle
    11. Leeds
    12. Birmingham
    13. Surrey
    14. Lough borough
    15. Manchester
    Lancaster should be somewhere on the list
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    (Original post by Luke7456)
    yes and for a few reasons. Firstly I wont actually have a Maths degree which is what i want.
    Fairly silly, rigid, superficial reason.

    I mean for A level maths what has become apparent is that I understand the stuff well enough to do well in exams but dont have the fundemental understanding I would like.

    Kind of like I understand what to do and how to apply it but I dont always understand why I am doing what I am doing. A level Maths is widely regarded to be very easy and simplistic when Compared to the STEP Exams you have to understand the math in a much greater depth. as would be the case for a Maths degree vs a Morse degree I assume?

    I dont just want to understand the math on a superficial level I want to actually grasp it on a fundamental level and the impression i get is the Maths degree will offer this to a much greater extent.
    Have you studied any maths beyond the A Level syllabus - Formal maths that might look like the kind of maths you are talking about when you describe rigour. Maybe a text which takes a more mature approach to calculus? You'll still have to do analysis and the like in MORSE. Just look at the course description. There is Pure mathematics in there and proof writing is abundant.

    It will also affect my Opportunities in Jobs will it not? surely a Maths degree is more valuable then some other degree that looks like bits and pieces of this and that.?
    MORSE, for instance, is designed specifically for the workplace, given the theoretical underpinning (because it does teach pure maths) and the specific, specialised skillsets that are actually useful to people in industry. A lot of maths is fairly useless and will not be applicable to even the most mathematically oriented jobs. So I'd so probably not. Most of the time Applied Maths will be most useful and then computer science and the like too.

    further I am quite likely to want to go into further study Masters PHD possibly beyond doesn't not having a full Maths degree limit my options in this regard?
    You are? It's a strange thing to say before you have even had any experience of research. Not a serious consideration probably. You don't even know what kinds of maths you enjoy or, if I understand correctly, what fields you like (the ones being of interest so far to you, outlined in another post, being those that you haven't even looked at yet. Surely that raises alarm bells!) The said, you'd still qualify for research in mathematics but, yes, it'd probably be related to the topics you'd studied as an undergraduate in stats, decision science, etc.

    Seems like a lot of doing things because the idea of them sounds good instead of because you actually want to do them.
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    (Original post by Athematica)
    Fairly silly, rigid, superficial reason.



    Have you studied any maths beyond the A Level syllabus - Formal maths that might look like the kind of maths you are talking about when you describe rigour. Maybe a text which takes a more mature approach to calculus? You'll still have to do analysis and the like in MORSE. Just look at the course description. There is Pure mathematics in there and proof writing is abundant.


    MORSE, for instance, is designed specifically for the workplace, given the theoretical underpinning (because it does teach pure maths) and the specific, specialised skillsets that are actually useful to people in industry. A lot of maths is fairly useless and will not be applicable to even the most mathematically oriented jobs. So I'd so probably not. Most of the time Applied Maths will be most useful and then computer science and the like too.


    You are? It's a strange thing to say before you have even had any experience of research. Not a serious consideration probably. You don't even know what kinds of maths you enjoy or, if I understand correctly, what fields you like (the ones being of interest so far to you, outlined in another post, being those that you haven't even looked at yet. Surely that raises alarm bells!) The said, you'd still qualify for research in mathematics but, yes, it'd probably be related to the topics you'd studied as an undergraduate in stats, decision science, etc.

    Seems like a lot of doing things because the idea of them sounds good instead of because you actually want to do them.

    well yeah some good points if you have some texts you would recommend that would be appreciated in regards to understanding the maths in a more formal way.

    you might be right about the employment thing but the impression I get is that Employers have a lot of respect for Maths but not so much for bits and pieces.

    and yes I don't understand the advanced maths yet enough to know I would like it for sure Its hard to know I would want to go into research in Maths or Masters/PHD at this stage. But I know I the sound of that idea and I want to keep my options open for that.

    we had Mathematical modules at my last degree I got whole grades above a first in them and I have to say they really were not hard. To compare them to A level Maths would be a huge stretch in fact I question whether those modules could be comparable to GCSE Maths.

    and you can do courses like that but it usually is not proper Maths.

    Maybe I will find out I don't want to go on and do Masters and PHD in Maths, but at least I would have that option open.

    One thing about me is I can procrastinate on maybes and evaluating all possible eventualities and procrastinate with this to such an extent that it becomes an obstacle to ever actually achieving any of the eventualities. So I swore to myself I would not start looking at degree programs in real detail until I had actual results.

    I like to know good universities and entry requirements because that gives me something to shoot for and motivates me. I can now say to myself "well you want to go to Warwick so make sure you get A*A* otherwise it probably wont happen"

    then I can motivate myself to study for that.

    However If I get A*A/ AA/ AB this year I can pretty much rule out Warwick so no point in delving into the real depths of maths degrees at the moment. once I have my first two A levels out the way and can assess where is realistic to apply for. I don't think they are a big fan of resits are they?

    Note I am self teaching Maths and further Maths this year, and then the following year Additional further Maths and Physics.

    I would then have completed four a Levels over a two year period.

    I am aware that some universities don't like this and prefer all A levels are completed in the same sitting but I think that is meant to apply to people who take an entire year after they gain the A levels to resit modules or A levels that did not go according to plan.

    Either way If I get rejected from universities that My grades in the first half suggest I should be able to get offers from then I will firm a weaker university and go into the exams working for the higher universities standards and if I hit that take a Gap year Reapply with full grades and see what happens. If I fail to meet higher entry requirements then I can simply go to whoever I firmed etc.

    I am aware of adjustment on results day so maybe that could be an avenue do Imperial or Warwick participate in Adjustment?
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    How about France or ETH? Some German unis are also very strong in their mathematics education.

    Cost you less.
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    (Original post by yudothis)
    How about France or ETH? Some German unis are also very strong in their mathematics education.

    Cost you less.
    My language skills suck I don't speak any french or German and have no intention of learning either. I don't know if the universities would do courses in English I doubt it but hypothetically if they did would their libraries be in English? the Books reading materials etc?

    Even if yes to all of that I would still have the issue of struggling to connect with the locals or when i went to the shops etc.

    Plus I would not feel to safe in Germany or France.

    I would definitely consider a number of American universities if it was not for the fact that they cost so much more. I suppose If I could get a Scholarship maybe but I doubt they offer those to mature students who already have one degree. I think its safe to assume I am glued to England for Universities. However if you could find an English speaking country whom had affordable universities which were very good universities then sure I would not rule it out.
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    (Original post by Luke7456)
    well yeah some good points if you have some texts you would recommend that would be appreciated in regards to understanding the maths in a more formal way.

    you might be right about the employment thing but the impression I get is that Employers have a lot of respect for Maths but not so much for bits and pieces.

    and yes I don't understand the advanced maths yet enough to know I would like it for sure Its hard to know I would want to go into research in Maths or Masters/PHD at this stage. But I know I the sound of that idea and I want to keep my options open for that.

    we had Mathematical modules at my last degree I got whole grades above a first in them and I have to say they really were not hard. To compare them to A level Maths would be a huge stretch in fact I question whether those modules could be comparable to GCSE Maths.

    and you can do courses like that but it usually is not proper Maths.

    Maybe I will find out I don't want to go on and do Masters and PHD in Maths, but at least I would have that option open.

    One thing about me is I can procrastinate on maybes and evaluating all possible eventualities and procrastinate with this to such an extent that it becomes an obstacle to ever actually achieving any of the eventualities. So I swore to myself I would not start looking at degree programs in real detail until I had actual results.

    I like to know good universities and entry requirements because that gives me something to shoot for and motivates me. I can now say to myself "well you want to go to Warwick so make sure you get A*A* otherwise it probably wont happen"

    then I can motivate myself to study for that.

    However If I get A*A/ AA/ AB this year I can pretty much rule out Warwick so no point in delving into the real depths of maths degrees at the moment. once I have my first two A levels out the way and can assess where is realistic to apply for. I don't think they are a big fan of resits are they?

    Note I am self teaching Maths and further Maths this year, and then the following year Additional further Maths and Physics.

    I would then have completed four a Levels over a two year period.

    I am aware that some universities don't like this and prefer all A levels are completed in the same sitting but I think that is meant to apply to people who take an entire year after they gain the A levels to resit modules or A levels that did not go according to plan.

    Either way If I get rejected from universities that My grades in the first half suggest I should be able to get offers from then I will firm a weaker university and go into the exams working for the higher universities standards and if I hit that take a Gap year Reapply with full grades and see what happens. If I fail to meet higher entry requirements then I can simply go to whoever I firmed etc.

    I am aware of adjustment on results day so maybe that could be an avenue do Imperial or Warwick participate in Adjustment?
    First of all, MORSE is one of the most employable degrees out there, it is a maths degree you will have a Bsc or Masters in Mathematics, Operational Research, Statistics, Economics. If you want to go into actuarial science/finance it is a very good degree. It is mainly maths 50%pure and 15% stat the rest are operational research and eco. You can choose if you want more maths or others in the 3rd year. Very flexible degree. Plus you dont need A*A*A*A* to get in, if you do further maths, for MORSE you only need A*AA, if you arre gonna do additional maths if would likely be A*AB. If you want to motivate yourself apply to Cambridge, it is better than the rest, you would need A*A*A-A*A*A*+
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    (Original post by Samendra)
    First of all, MORSE is one of the most employable degrees out there, it is a maths degree you will have a Bsc or Masters in Mathematics, Operational Research, Statistics, Economics. If you want to go into actuarial science/finance it is a very good degree. It is mainly maths 50%pure and 15% stat the rest are operational research and eco. You can choose if you want more maths or others in the 3rd year. Very flexible degree. Plus you dont need A*A*A*A* to get in, if you do further maths, for MORSE you only need A*AA, if you arre gonna do additional maths if would likely be A*AB. If you want to motivate yourself apply to Cambridge, it is better than the rest, you would need A*A*A-A*A*A*+
    Well I have some concerns about Morse degree but I got to say it really does look like what I want to do. Though I always envisioned myself having a Maths degree and this would mean I don't. when I get my Grades I will give it some serious consideration but If I get A*A or even AA might be worth applying as that wont get me into the straight maths.

    I am sitting Maths and Further Maths this year then the next two next year so I will already have two actual grades next year.
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    (Original post by Luke7456)
    That is what puts me off a bit I want to know I did completed the most challenging or one of the most challenging Math Degrees part of the attraction of Warwick.

    However I guess what really puts me off Bath, is the fact it is where I met my ex. I don't believe It is appropriate to mention peoples names on these forums so I will refer to her in the most positive terms I am realistically able to bring myself to. So The thing is every time I am in Bath which is a beautiful town I am remaindered of Narcissistic gold digging whore which depresses me. Maybe in time in Bath I would forget about Narcissistic gold digging whore and come to appreciate the full beauty of the town and be happy. However their is also the possibility this hangs a long linger of depression.
    **** that **** bro. Stay away from there then. Last thing you want is to be reminded of a girl like that and feel that you are doing a degree which makes you feel as if you are capable of much more. Sounds a bit pretentious, but it is true. Go somewhere else.

    Fluid dynamics will be of zero relevance to stock markets or any type of business/economic analysis related maths. The only crossover in my opinion would be programming skills. Fluid dynamics is more or less using vector calculus to solve/express physical problems concerning fluids. For example you'd probably find yourself being taught alongside engineers and science students in a fluids module, depends though.

    Some advice if you are looking to go down the data analysis/OR route, bare in mind I am not a maths student myself, but having a good grip of programming would be a huge advantage in getting a job. So maybe considering a university which offers computing modules as free choice or computing related maths modules would be a good idea. You can always get a head start by teaching yourself.

    As for other unis, it isn't UK, but Trinity is pretty good, I'd certainly put it above some on the list you have made.
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    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    **** that **** bro. Stay away from there then. Last thing you want is to be reminded of a girl like that and feel that you are doing a degree which makes you feel as if you are capable of much more. Sounds a bit pretentious, but it is true. Go somewhere else.

    Fluid dynamics will be of zero relevance to stock markets or any type of business/economic analysis related maths. The only crossover in my opinion would be programming skills. Fluid dynamics is more or less using vector calculus to solve/express physical problems concerning fluids. For example you'd probably find yourself being taught alongside engineers and science students in a fluids module, depends though.

    Some advice if you are looking to go down the data analysis/OR route, bare in mind I am not a maths student myself, but having a good grip of programming would be a huge advantage in getting a job. So maybe considering a university which offers computing modules as free choice or computing related maths modules would be a good idea. You can always get a head start by teaching yourself.

    As for other unis, it isn't UK, but Trinity is pretty good, I'd certainly put it above some on the list you have made.
    Trinity? where is that?

    the problem I have in regards to international universities is the cost I can get 50-60 k together and make the rest in the breaks or during term time etc.

    However I can't get 70k a year which is what a lot of american universities ask for my poker skills just are not that good and whilst i think i could get that good with a lot of hard work it would mean blowing the degree.

    Yeah Fluid Dynamics is more something I would be interested in for interest sake not going into a career of. I think I see my future career in probability and statistics hence why I am thinking maybe statistics and maths degrees make more sense then just straight maths. However still not decided on that. When I imagine myself at Cambridge or Warwick doing the straight maths degree I always imagine myself picking statistics modules in the optional units.

    which probs means I should do maths and statistics rather then straight maths but will have to think on this one.

    Yeah I should learn programming that is not a bad shout.
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    (Original post by Luke7456)
    Okay well my list so far would include obviously the pure maths side

    Also
    probability and statistics
    Chaos Theory
    Operational research (which is what I really want out of a maths degree but have only just right now learned what it is called)


    Fluid Dynamics sounds interesting but its not at the top of my priorities

    and I would like to look at how this Math can be applied to the stock market and gambling theory as well.

    I was thinking Warwick may be the best choice for university because they have so many modules they are bound to cover this. I would say those three are the big things I am aware of so far that I want to cover.

    Operational research is exactly what I want from a degree I just have not researched the universities or maths courses in depth yet.
    If you want an idea of what that kind of program might entail, look at the operations research and financial engineering (ORFE) undergraduate program at Princeton in the US. A big feeder program to Wall Street.

    Https://orfe.princeton.edu/home
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    (Original post by skitheeast)
    If you want an idea of what that kind of program might entail, look at the operations research and financial engineering (ORFE) undergraduate program at Princeton in the US. A big feeder program to Wall Street.

    Https://orfe.princeton.edu/home
    i dont think I can afford Princetons tuition.
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    (Original post by skitheeast)
    If you want an idea of what that kind of program might entail, look at the operations research and financial engineering (ORFE) undergraduate program at Princeton in the US. A big feeder program to Wall Street.

    Https://orfe.princeton.edu/home
    Such a sexy programme.

    The difference is that MORSE doesn't have the computational aspect like that course. It's similar otherwise.
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    (Original post by Luke7456)
    Trinity? where is that?

    the problem I have in regards to international universities is the cost I can get 50-60 k together and make the rest in the breaks or during term time etc.

    However I can't get 70k a year which is what a lot of american universities ask for my poker skills just are not that good and whilst i think i could get that good with a lot of hard work it would mean blowing the degree.

    Yeah Fluid Dynamics is more something I would be interested in for interest sake not going into a career of. I think I see my future career in probability and statistics hence why I am thinking maybe statistics and maths degrees make more sense then just straight maths. However still not decided on that. When I imagine myself at Cambridge or Warwick doing the straight maths degree I always imagine myself picking statistics modules in the optional units.

    which probs means I should do maths and statistics rather then straight maths but will have to think on this one.

    Yeah I should learn programming that is not a bad shout.
    Trinity College Dublin, the city is expensive to live in, not much different to London (not sure which is more expensive, maybe for you it would be Dublin with the exchange rate). There are no tuition fees in R.o.Ireland, but there is a registration fee of a couple of thousand euro I believe. So you'd still pay less for a full degree than one year in the UK. Obviously no student finance, but there are funding options available however.

    Honestly, degree titles are kind of ******** really, depending on how much freedom you get to chose your own modules you could do a maths and statistics degree that is mostly engineering type maths (fluid dynamics, solid mechanics etc) or a straight maths degree made up of mostly statistics modules. It really depends on the course, just thoroughly check the university's department and course, find out what options are available etc, how much detail the modules you like go into, I'd base your decision on things like that as opposed to the overall reputation of the university.

    If you want to learn programming, invest in a raspberry pi (£25 or so) you can use it via a laptop if you haven't got a PC (for access to keyboard/monitor/mouse), there are a wealth of resources online you can use to find projects etc that will help you to code. Python would be the best bet, it is free to use (unlike MATLAB) and is a good first language to start on (it is a C type language, so learning Python will give you a head start at university if you ever need to learn MATLAB, C/C++ or Java). Besides university, a lot of jobs these days will value programming skills highly.
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    (Original post by Luke7456)
    it seems everyone and their dog knows the big four universities for Maths in this country are Cambridge Oxford Imperial College and Warwick.

    However whatever happens next year I will find myself applying for at least two universities outside of these four. Since we can only choose one from Oxbridge and we have five choices. Hopefully it will only be two outside these 3 but we time will answer that.

    I am sure some people would disagree with me but if I had to assemble a top 15 not including these four I would come up with

    This isn't intended to be in any particular order of rank but obviously I thought of more of the better universities first. A notable omission is LSE I don't count them because as far as I am aware they don't do a straight Maths course it is always combined with something else.
    I am just wondering where people would rank these universities. I also missed out Southampton and York do you think that is fair or do you think they are better then some of the universities I have mentioned?

    1. Durham
    2. St Andrews
    3. Bristol
    4. Bath
    5. Edinburgh
    6. Nottingham
    7. UCL
    8. Glasgow
    9. Exeter
    10. Newcastle
    11. Leeds
    12. Birmingham
    13. Surrey
    14. Lough borough
    15. Manchester
    If you don't mind going abroad, National University of Singapore, University of Toronto, University of Waterloo and Chinese University of Hong Kong may be some good options as well!

    Would definitely rank many of these universities above those you named (better programs, research facilities, global reputation if you care etc...) and they are more affordable than studying in the US.

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    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    Trinity College Dublin, the city is expensive to live in, not much different to London (not sure which is more expensive, maybe for you it would be Dublin with the exchange rate). There are no tuition fees in R.o.Ireland, but there is a registration fee of a couple of thousand euro I believe. So you'd still pay less for a full degree than one year in the UK. Obviously no student finance, but there are funding options available however.

    Honestly, degree titles are kind of ******** really, depending on how much freedom you get to chose your own modules you could do a maths and statistics degree that is mostly engineering type maths (fluid dynamics, solid mechanics etc) or a straight maths degree made up of mostly statistics modules. It really depends on the course, just thoroughly check the university's department and course, find out what options are available etc, how much detail the modules you like go into, I'd base your decision on things like that as opposed to the overall reputation of the university.

    If you want to learn programming, invest in a raspberry pi (£25 or so) you can use it via a laptop if you haven't got a PC (for access to keyboard/monitor/mouse), there are a wealth of resources online you can use to find projects etc that will help you to code. Python would be the best bet, it is free to use (unlike MATLAB) and is a good first language to start on (it is a C type language, so learning Python will give you a head start at university if you ever need to learn MATLAB, C/C++ or Java). Besides university, a lot of jobs these days will value programming skills highly.
    Yeah reputation should not be such a major factor but, I think it is important to be honest with yourself and go for things that mean something to you. The fact is prestige does matter to me.

    My Uncle is a professor of chemistry at a university not exactly the best university certainly not Russel group though I don't know of the top of my head which university it is. Anyway he writes me off a lot and when I mentioned I want to go to a COWI university he said outright I can rule three of those out. We can guess which three.

    Of course He strikes me as been pompous and speaking utter crap. For example he said Bristol are not a top 100 university so I might stand a chance at them maybe they scrape into the top 200 apparently (in the world). However he also said the best sources for this are the times higher education League tables and the Shanghai Rankings.

    In the times University guide 2018 (of course I would buy that) Bristol came 48th in the world. in the Shanghai rankings they came 57th. Now I am not going to draw attention away from the central point of this thread arguing whether Bristol are or are not in fact a world top 100. I think they are every league table I have seen puts them there, but regardless if your going to say they are barely top 200 then cite sources that say they are around 50th then you kind of lose credibility.

    So maybe I should not listen to him when he says where I can and cant get in. its just people like him everywhere who write me off and are so quick to say yeah you cant ever get in there, and then their is always the part of me that fears they may be right.

    so prestige is something that means a lot to me, and it will affect my happiness at university so I should take it into account. That been said obviously I don't want to risk doing this to the extent that I choose a course I am unhappy on over a course I am happy on.

    Of course looking at the course the area of the university and the life etc is an important factor. But I think the Prestige thing becomes a given if we eliminate the Elite Prestige. What I mean by that is just under 35% of all mathematical courses ask for AAA+ which basically means I need 3 A grades or better to avoid been miserable.

    with 3 A grades only I could go to Strathclyde, Swansea, Sussex, Loughborough or Surrey. However obviously I would not be happy at these. Alternatively Southampton and Manchester would appear much stronger options here.

    obviously the dream is ending up at Oxbridge but I don't see them making an offer suppose it can't hurt to apply if I get A*A* does Oxford ask everyone to take the MAT then decide on who they interview from that?

    (Original post by wolfmoon88)
    If you don't mind going abroad, National University of Singapore, University of Toronto, University of Waterloo and Chinese University of Hong Kong may be some good options as well!

    Would definitely rank many of these universities above those you named (better programs, research facilities, global reputation if you care etc...) and they are more affordable than studying in the US.

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    yeah its not a bad idea but if I went to Singapore I would not graduate from university or come back any time soon I would likely end up in Prison. I think they have Blaspheme laws and I am not the best at holding my tongue.

    Hong Kong seems like an option however my younger brother lives in Hong Kong which would mean listening to him complain about Trump 6 times a day seriously he never lets it go, and it just gets old after a while.

    its more affordable then the US like you said however they are still more expensive then the UK and the living costs are high in Hong Kong. from quick googling the exchange rate it appears it would cost me £14,600 a year. Unless somehow UK counts as been local because we leased Hong Kong for a large period of time in which case £4200 which would make it an attractive option in that case.

    Would their courses be English?
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    (Original post by Luke7456)
    Yeah its not a bad idea but if I went to Singapore I would not graduate from university or come back any time soon I would likely end up in Prison. I think they have Blaspheme laws and I am not the best at holding my tongue.

    Hong Kong seems like an option however my younger brother lives in Hong Kong which would mean listening to him complain about Trump 6 times a day seriously he never lets it go, and it just gets old after a while.

    its more affordable then the US like you said however they are still more expensive then the UK and the living costs are high in Hong Kong. from quick googling the exchange rate it appears it would cost me £14,600 a year. Unless somehow UK counts as been local because we leased Hong Kong for a large period of time in which case £4200 which would make it an attractive option in that case.

    Would their courses be English?
    Firstly, Oxford asks everyone to take the MAT. If you score a high score in the MAT there is a good chance that they'll give you an interview. If you get to the interview, anything can happen so don't put down yourself too much before even trying to apply there. Although, in my opinion, Maths and Philosophy is a better course than pure Maths in Oxford but that's just a personal preference more than anything else because coupling Maths and Philosophy is something that is an homage to the history of Mathematics and its origins.

    https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/unde...losophy?wssl=1

    In terms of studying in the Asian universities that I named, all of their courses are in English. You might have some issues in terms of communicating with people in stores and stuff (more so in HK than in Singapore) but otherwise, the course will be taught in English. I do not think the UK counts as local (CUHK's representatives are in my country right now so I can check for you if you'd like.) so yes it is definitely more expensive than the UK. But I am just offering you another option because it seems like from all the threads I've seen you in and some conversations in threads that we had, you think that prestige is pretty important so these Asian universities definitely have an international reputation. In terms of the Blasphemy laws in Singapore... as long as you don't say dumb crap about their government policies on the internet... I am sure that in the confines of the campus it won't be too bad. Tsinghua and Peking University in China is also an option but I am not sure if their courses are in English (I know for Peking it isn't but not sure about Tsinghua especially with its American roots). I will check for you and get back to you on that.

    If you have any more questions about universities abroad (in particularly in Asia, North America, and Australia) just ask

    Hope this helps!

    and don't listen to your uncle... Bristol is in the Top 100 for many subjects in the world... I am East Asian, we are extremely fixated with rankings and crap... although I don't really agree with the bs a lot of the time.
 
 
 
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