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"I don't have enough time" is crap, yes you do. Watch

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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    People, especially students, like to say they don't have enough time to do things like clean, exercise, make meals, study, see friends, shop, etc. These people are not using their time effectively. Wake up an hour early to exercise or clean, do things at set times, be more organised, don't take breaks for hours and hours watching Netflix or sitting on Facebook.

    Today I woke up at 6, made breakfast, did an hour of cardio, showered, cleaned my room, vacuumed the house, took the bins out and packed by bag for tomorrow, all before 8. Then I did laundry, ironing and made lunch for tomorrow. I did a couple of hours of studying, went out to do food shopping, put it all away and that came to 2pm. I've had a friend over since then, and now I'm on an exercise bike while writing this. You do have time, stop moaning you don't.
    You stink of arrogance.
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    Good for you
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    (Original post by cbreef)
    You stink of arrogance.
    Most appreciated, thank you.
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    If the world were merely seductive, that would be easy. If it were merely challenging, that would be no problem. But I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it hard to plan the day.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    Most appreciated, thank you.
    I don't understand why you keep going on about how good and organised you are.
    Most people don't get up at 6am to do exercise and shower and you can't convince them to do otherwise.
    Why? Because they much prefer staying in bed. It's way better.
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    (Original post by cbreef)
    I don't understand why you keep going on about how good and organised you are.
    Most people don't get up at 6am to do exercise and shower and you can't convince them to do otherwise.
    Why? Because they much prefer staying in bed. It's way better.
    I keep 'going on' about it because I'm not one of those people who moans they have 'no time' and livestream a pigsty, like do many do. Maybe, just maybe this thread has inspired one person to have a more active, clean and organised life; that would be an achievement. Staying in bed is a waste of time, you're not benefitting your body and you're not benefitting your life.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    I keep 'going on' about it because I'm not one of those people who moans they have 'no time' and livestream a pigsty, like do many do. Maybe, just maybe this thread has inspired one person to have a more active, clean and organised life; that would be an achievement. Staying in bed is a waste of time, you're not benefitting your body and you're not benefitting your life.
    Yes, because getting up at 6am is really good for you, but I digress. Staying in bed might be a waste of time you could be using, but most do not care. It's fun, and I must admit, your strict schedule sounds not very fun at all.
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    (Original post by cbreef)
    Yes, because getting up at 6am is really good for you, but I digress. Staying in bed might be a waste of time you could be using, but most do not care. It's fun, and I must admit, your strict schedule sounds not very fun at all.
    We all have our own interpretations of fun, mine is to be productive and to make sure things are sorted. If yours is to eat Twix just after you've woken up at 3pm and then switch on Netflix, good for you. Mine is better.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    We all have our own interpretations of fun, mine is to be productive and to make sure things are sorted. If yours is to eat Twix just after you've woken up at 3pm and then switch on Netflix, good for you. Mine is better.
    How is it better though?
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    (Original post by cbreef)
    How is it better though?
    You think being healthier, more productive, more organised, more efficient, having more energy, getting things done, not living in mess, etc are all bad things?
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    You think being healthier, more productive, more organised, more efficient, having more energy, getting things done, not living in mess, etc are all bad things?
    Absolutely not, but at the end of the day none of that matters if you're unhappy.
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    (Original post by cbreef)
    Absolutely not, but at the end of the day none of that matters if you're unhappy.
    One you make a commitment to start and are consistent with it, there's no reason you can't be happy doing what I do. Obviously the first day and first week are going to be hard.
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    Guys, happy is purely subjective. If you are both happy in your own routines then it really doesn't matter. There's no correct answer to which is better. Objectively, getting up at 6am to exercise is better compared to not excercising at all. However there's no obligation to get up at 6am. Being up early is not inherently better. There's really nothing wrong with getting up at 9am, exercising and so on. Plenty of great people had routines where they wake up late in the mornings. Someone who sleeps 10pm until 6am is really no different to someone that sleeps 1am to 9am, if they make the best use of their time.

    Staying in bed is absolutely not a waste of time. Resting is an integral part of staying healthy. However it's also important to find the right balance. I could happily sleep from 10pm until 10am. However I've found that I function better on around 7 hours of sleep, so I tend to sleep from 11-6 or 12-7. Knowing exactly what you are capable of is important. Staying in bed is good for you. Lounging in bed for hours after you wake up on the other hand is not (under normal circumstances).

    For the record, I'm not a "get up straight away" person. I'll wake up, immediately reach for my phone and check what has happened overnight. I usually play a few games of chess as well, or read. In general I won't get out of bed for half an hour after waking up. It's a pretty bad habit that I don't get up immediately but I also don't have an issue with using the time to play chess or read. I don't even have an issue with wasting some time on social media and replying, it gets it out of the way in the morning. I could get up immediately and shower but find I'm more awake after laying in bed for a bit and taxing my mind.

    To say some routine is better is entirely subjective. There is no scale with which to judge what is better and what is worse. To say "mine is better because yours is worse" doesn't help the argument.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Well it's not technically wrong, there are 24 hours in a day. Unless you want to be pedantic about there being 23 hours and X minutes.

    You are of course totally right about the amount of usable time though and once you account for an average 8 hours sleep, time spent showering, eating exercising and so on it's often closer to 12 hours per day. Arguably all of the above are absolute necessities if you want to keep living and for a long time.

    Realisitcally someone has 12 hours per day, or 84 hours per week of time to do with as they please, which may include work, education, hobbies and so on. The exact number is irrelevant though, the point is that the quantity is sufficient to fit in whatever you need to do. In it's most basic form you can take 8 hours for sleep, 8 hours for work/education, 4 hours for keeping yourself alive and healthy (eat, exercise) and be left with 4 hours every single day. It never works out like that but it's good for opening people's eyes to how much time they waste.
    Technically, most of the people have even a bit more than 84 hours, as they have not to work at the weekend days, so saturday and sunday. Otherwise I think the same. The time which is left is sufficient to do whatever we want to.
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    Technically, most of the people have even a bit more than 84 hours, as they have not to work at the weekend days, so saturday and sunday. Otherwise I think the same. The time which is left is sufficient to do whatever we want to.
    I think you misread slightly, it's 84 hours before work. 84 hours is what would be left over after sleeping, eating, showering, etc. After work you'd have something like 30-40 hours left. But even then that's still a substantial amount. Even if you spent 40 hours studying and 20 hours working part time you'd still have around 24 hours free, or roughly 3 hours per day.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Could you elaborate on this? I'd be interested to hear your reasoning and to see which perspective you're looking at it from.
    Sure, what I meant was that I've encountered a lot of students that don't have a weekend job, my last job before I went to Uni was as an Assistant Manager at a local charity shop, and have stayed on weekends during term times.

    My point is that as I know the ins and outs of charity shops, I know for a fact EVERY charity shop NEEDS volunteers, its literally impossible to not find work experience if you're willing to do volunteer work while looking for a paid position.

    Having work experience during your time studying makes your C.V. much stronger.
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    That is not quite right. If it is considered that people are sleeping 6 up to 9 hours, there are 15 up to 18 hours left to use the day. Working time and time for learnung excluded.
    Exactly, and you sleep 6 to 9 hours because you (OBVIOUSLY) value sleeping more than anything else you could do during that time (because it's necessary). And you study because you value studying. (As you should). The same principle applies for everything else, if you value exercise more than x, then you will do exercise for an hour rather than doing x for an hour. If you have time for both, you will do both. But if you only have an hour, you can only choose one. And whichever one you choose, is whichever you value most.

    There's always time on the day, some of which is used on necessary things. But there is also always time after doing all the necessary things.
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    (Original post by loooopppyyy)
    Sure, what I meant was that I've encountered a lot of students that don't have a weekend job, my last job before I went to Uni was as an Assistant Manager at a local charity shop, and have stayed on weekends during term times.

    My point is that as I know the ins and outs of charity shops, I know for a fact EVERY charity shop NEEDS volunteers, its literally impossible to not find work experience if you're willing to do volunteer work while looking for a paid position.

    Having work experience during your time studying makes your C.V. much stronger.
    I wouldn't outright say not having a job is the issue here. The issue is more to do with lack of experience. While I completely agree that having a job and getting experience is great I don't think it's apporopriate to have a job if that interferes with your studies. There's no point having a job to boost your CV if it detracts from the degree itself. Even worse is when people get a job because they need to, as without it they couldn't afford uni

    I personally worked for 4 years, mix of part time and full time before coming to uni. I was very much set on not having a job as it'd interfere with my studies and other stuff I wanted to do. While having a job would be beneficial I didn't deem the loss of weekends for example to be worth it. However I did apply and get a job as a student ambassador, although it's very casual hours, as and when needed.

    I don't feel this detracts from my CV in any way. I still have the years of work experience that someone would get from working part time at uni but it hasn't impacted my studies. Next year I hope to be working with the police and I ahven't decided on doing a placement the year after that. Both of which will offer me useful work experience that's relevant to my potential careers.

    I completely agree that experience is important but I don't think not having apart time job at uni is a problem. From an experience perspective I'm unaffected as I got that experience earlier. From a monetary perspective I'm unaffected because I have savings and additional income. From a time perspective I'm benefitting because it doesn't impact my studies, coming to uni later has left me more mature and so on. Personally I think everyone should take some time out of education after college to work, learn to manage their money, mature a bit, get experience and so on.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    I wouldn't outright say not having a job is the issue here. The issue is more to do with lack of experience. While I completely agree that having a job and getting experience is great I don't think it's apporopriate to have a job if that interferes with your studies. There's no point having a job to boost your CV if it detracts from the degree itself. Even worse is when people get a job because they need to, as without it they couldn't afford uni

    I personally worked for 4 years, mix of part time and full time before coming to uni. I was very much set on not having a job as it'd interfere with my studies and other stuff I wanted to do. While having a job would be beneficial I didn't deem the loss of weekends for example to be worth it. However I did apply and get a job as a student ambassador, although it's very casual hours, as and when needed.

    I don't feel this detracts from my CV in any way. I still have the years of work experience that someone would get from working part time at uni but it hasn't impacted my studies. Next year I hope to be working with the police and I ahven't decided on doing a placement the year after that. Both of which will offer me useful work experience that's relevant to my potential careers.

    I completely agree that experience is important but I don't think not having apart time job at uni is a problem. From an experience perspective I'm unaffected as I got that experience earlier. From a monetary perspective I'm unaffected because I have savings and additional income. From a time perspective I'm benefitting because it doesn't impact my studies, coming to uni later has left me more mature and so on. Personally I think everyone should take some time out of education after college to work, learn to manage their money, mature a bit, get experience and so on.
    Saying having a job detracts you from study is a fallacy, doing a 10-4 shift every sunday wont detract from study time unless your already spending too much time partying.

    I spend 3 hours a day driving to and from Uni (long travel route), have my daughter full-time and work Saturday and Sunday ALL DAY.

    My Comp Sci term 1 results? 100%, 95%, 90%, 88% (still waiting on 1 to get back), I plan to drop one day of working a week IF my workload becomes too much, at the moment its manageable and I need the money to pay rent/bills/food.
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    (Original post by loooopppyyy)
    Saying having a job detracts you from study is a fallacy, doing a 10-4 shift every sunday wont detract from study time unless your already spending too much time partying.

    I spend 3 hours a day driving to and from Uni (long travel route), have my daughter full-time and work Saturday and Sunday ALL DAY.

    My Comp Sci term 1 results? 100%, 95%, 90%, 88% (still waiting on 1 to get back), I plan to drop one day of working a week IF my workload becomes too much, at the moment its manageable and I need the money to pay rent/bills/food.
    No, of course small shifts like that won't. Be a fair number of people will be doing larger amounts of work. When you're doing closer to 20 or 30 hours that will have an impact. Of course doing 6 hours a week won't have much of an impact.

    It's also not necessarily a direct impact. For example maybe you do the 40 hours a week necessary to get good grades. You spend some of the remaining time working. You're left with maybe 10 hours of free time a week to just relax. That's going to impact your happiness and health. Again, the 6 hour shift on a Sunday won't impact that but a normal work week around 10-20 hours probably will.

    Of course you can succeed, although not everyone can reliably succeed if they are dedicating time to other things like a job. It isn't going to be possible for everyone. However that detracts from the original point, that having a job at uni is not a necessitiy. I'm at uni every day, if I was a more normal student I'd probably be socialising between classes. I'd probably do some work in the evening, maybe go out partying and so on. That's perfectly reasonable for a student, if not the most ideal thing to do. To then encourage them to get a job on top of that creates an unecessary workload.

    I'm not at all saying the students shouldn't get a job, just that it's not something that is absolutely necessary. Sure, you may be able to balance socialising, uni work and a job. Is that going to have an impact? Of course it is. But of course it's different for each person and there's no hard and fast rule as to whether someone should get a job or not. I personally err on the side of focusing on your studies. I can do my 40 hours per week if necessary, spend time on other hobbies and activities and still have time to take an interest in my subject, reading around for fun. If I had to work as well something would be impacted, for me to dedicate X hours to work I have to take X hours from some other activity. There's no tangible benefit to that, compared to what I'd be doing instead.

    And incidentally studying doesn't start and stop with uni. I personally work on a bunch of personal projects and of course these are the sorts of things that I'd have to drop first if I wanted to make time for a job. That's not at all worth it to me. But neither does it represent your average student
 
 
 
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