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    (Original post by Acsel)
    There's no tangible benefit to that, compared to what I'd be doing instead
    I think having work experience on your cv is pretty tangible to me, personally. :P
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    (Original post by loooopppyyy)
    I think having work experience on your cv is pretty tangible to me, personally. :P
    Except you've taken that point entirely out of context. As I explicitly stated before I already have 4 years experience working in retail. If I did get a job at uni it would have been a transfer to a local store. There's a very minimal benefit for me considering I already have that experience. I'd rather work on something that bolsters my CV.

    For example I'm learning Japanese, learning about / writing my own steganography application and working on business ideas. All of those are far better uses of my time and improve my CV compared to getting an extra 3 years of shop work. Like I said, working part time isn't likely to bring me any tangible benefits because I already have 4 years work experience on my CV. The gains from here on are entirely marginal. The exception of course is to find a job that gives me relevant experience, not just low level experience that you'd get from volunteering or working behind a bar. But the odds of that happening are exceptionally small. Hence why I took a job as an ambassador and intend to work with the police next year. They are good investments of my time with proper returns.

    Working a typical part time job is a 1 to 1 trade. You trade X amount of time for Y amount of money. I want to trade my X amount of time for something worth more than Y amount of money. In the case of the ambassador I trade it for Y money and new experience that looks good on a CV. Working with the police trades X time for Y exceptional experience that looks really good on a CV. This is the entire point I've been trying to make. Students, especially those who already have the experience like to trade their time for money at a job when there's no other real benefits. Rather than working during uni, do the work before. It solves the money issue, the experience issue and has other benefits. Then you can use uni to take advantage of the other enriching opportunites available to you. In my case that gives me time to do archery and fencing (which weren't really practical at home), join other societies like anime, gaming and IT to socialise and make connections, put serious time into learning new skills (business, language, piano), work on projects that make me learn and look good (data recovery, steganography) and generally just do whatever I like. Sure, if I worked I'd have some time. But I'd be far less flexible. Since I already got the work experience out of the way I can focus on things that are far more enriching
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Except you've taken that point entirely out of context. As I explicitly stated before I already have 4 years experience working in retail. If I did get a job at uni it would have been a transfer to a local store. There's a very minimal benefit for me considering I already have that experience. I'd rather work on something that bolsters my CV.

    For example I'm learning Japanese, learning about / writing my own steganography application and working on business ideas. All of those are far better uses of my time and improve my CV compared to getting an extra 3 years of shop work. Like I said, working part time isn't likely to bring me any tangible benefits because I already have 4 years work experience on my CV. The gains from here on are entirely marginal. The exception of course is to find a job that gives me relevant experience, not just low level experience that you'd get from volunteering or working behind a bar. But the odds of that happening are exceptionally small. Hence why I took a job as an ambassador and intend to work with the police next year. They are good investments of my time with proper returns.

    Working a typical part time job is a 1 to 1 trade. You trade X amount of time for Y amount of money. I want to trade my X amount of time for something worth more than Y amount of money. In the case of the ambassador I trade it for Y money and new experience that looks good on a CV. Working with the police trades X time for Y exceptional experience that looks really good on a CV. This is the entire point I've been trying to make. Students, especially those who already have the experience like to trade their time for money at a job when there's no other real benefits. Rather than working during uni, do the work before. It solves the money issue, the experience issue and has other benefits. Then you can use uni to take advantage of the other enriching opportunites available to you. In my case that gives me time to do archery and fencing (which weren't really practical at home), join other societies like anime, gaming and IT to socialise and make connections, put serious time into learning new skills (business, language, piano), work on projects that make me learn and look good (data recovery, steganography) and generally just do whatever I like. Sure, if I worked I'd have some time. But I'd be far less flexible. Since I already got the work experience out of the way I can focus on things that are far more enriching
    And you're also missing the point, if you have previous work experience and decide not to work while in Uni, you will now have whats called a "Gap in employment".

    Two people graduate with the same degree classification, one has 3 years work experience, 3 years of no work while studying, another has 2 years work experience upto the present which was done while also at Uni.

    Personally if I was an employer I would pick the second as it shows they can deal with the workloads needed at work WHILE having a busy life outside of work, this is a strong indication that they can work under pressure and are reliable. The first would raise red flags for me as a long term investment and I would question why they didn't do any part time work during studies in the interview.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    I do what makes me happy. Everyone's parents wants their children to be happy, just because my parents involve money in that's doesn't make it wrong.
    Everyone's?
    What planet are you living on?
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    (Original post by loooopppyyy)
    And you're also missing the point, if you have previous work experience and decide not to work while in Uni, you will now have whats called a "Gap in employment".

    Two people graduate with the same degree classification, one has 3 years work experience, 3 years of no work while studying, another has 2 years work experience upto the present which was done while also at Uni.

    Personally if I was an employer I would pick the second as it shows they can deal with the workloads needed at work WHILE having a busy life outside of work, this is a strong indication that they can work under pressure and are reliable. The first would raise red flags for me as a long term investment and I would question why they didn't do any part time work during studies in the interview.
    And you'll also find plenty of employers who won't even register that as a factor, so why give it a moment's thought?

    It's a shame how many young people spend time micromanaging their life to just to try to match up with the current trend in what employers supposedly want to see on a CV.
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    (Original post by offhegoes)
    just to try to match up with the current trend in what employers supposedly want to see on a CV.
    And therein lies the issue, prospective employers are your future bosses, not your future friends, they will pick the most suitable candidate from a pool of 100+ people, if your not willing to put in the extra effort to stand out from this pool, don't moan when you're not selected...

    Why should someone get a job over someone else that has clearly put in more effort to become employable???
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    (Original post by Cremated_Spatula)
    Everyone's?
    What planet are you living on?
    Destroy Glassapple
    • Thread Starter
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    (Original post by AshEntropy)
    Destroy Glassapple
    Do you do anything but insult me? I reported one your posts, which has been removed, for harassment.

    (Original post by Cremated_Spatula)
    Everyone's? What planet are you living on?
    Obviously not everyone's, it's a figure of speech. I had assumed the general context would have been understood, considering it's true for the most part.
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    (Original post by loooopppyyy)
    And you're also missing the point, if you have previous work experience and decide not to work while in Uni, you will now have whats called a "Gap in employment".

    Two people graduate with the same degree classification, one has 3 years work experience, 3 years of no work while studying, another has 2 years work experience upto the present which was done while also at Uni.

    Personally if I was an employer I would pick the second as it shows they can deal with the workloads needed at work WHILE having a busy life outside of work, this is a strong indication that they can work under pressure and are reliable. The first would raise red flags for me as a long term investment and I would question why they didn't do any part time work during studies in the interview.
    That's really just your personal opinion though. It also assumes the person isn't doing a placement year and has no placement opportunities within their course. On top of that you're comparing someone with old experience and a gap to someone with new experience while completely disregarding what other things the first person could have been doing. As I said, I'm using that time to make the most out of University.

    If you were to do that comparison with me, you'd be comparing someone with 2 years work experience during their degree to someone with 4 years experience from before a degree who also spent time learning additional skills, doing extra curricular work and so on. I'd be taking the person who is more invested in themselves over the person who has less experience and didn't get a chance to make the most of their time at uni. So really my previous point still stands.

    Naturally you'd pick the second person in your scenario because you aren't fairly comparing them. You've set the second person up with an unfair advantage. Based on the information you have the person with the gap didn't gain anything from uni apart from their degree. It's far more likely they will have other things to show for it if they didn't spend the time working. Again, that's what my case is. If I didn't work part time at all at uni I'd have other things to use to sell myself (e.g. learning a language, evidence of personal projects, etc.). And from a personal perspective, an employer would be far more impressed with me as a candidate if I could evidence how I was involved in the industry through my own projects than if I had 3 years more experience working a basic part time job. To use your example, who would you take? The person with 2 years and a degree, or the person with 3 years, a degree and a gap in employment where they learned a language, participated in nationally recognised competitions and worked on open source software? I'd certainly take the latter because that gap in employment is perfectly justified.

    While not doing any part time work could be considered a red flag, it's also fair to assume the candidate will have a chance to explain themselves, if they haven't already in their application. It's also perfectly reasonable to not work at uni, considering you're studying full time for a degree. It's completely different to having some arbitrary break when there isn't clearly something else going on. It's quite reductionist to just assume any break in work is a red flag, there's almost always going to be more to it than that.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    That's really just your personal opinion though. It also assumes the person isn't doing a placement year and has no placement opportunities within their course. On top of that you're comparing someone with old experience and a gap to someone with new experience while completely disregarding what other things the first person could have been doing. As I said, I'm using that time to make the most out of University.

    If you were to do that comparison with me, you'd be comparing someone with 2 years work experience during their degree to someone with 4 years experience from before a degree who also spent time learning additional skills, doing extra curricular work and so on. I'd be taking the person who is more invested in themselves over the person who has less experience and didn't get a chance to make the most of their time at uni. So really my previous point still stands.

    Naturally you'd pick the second person in your scenario because you aren't fairly comparing them. You've set the second person up with an unfair advantage. Based on the information you have the person with the gap didn't gain anything from uni apart from their degree. It's far more likely they will have other things to show for it if they didn't spend the time working. Again, that's what my case is. If I didn't work part time at all at uni I'd have other things to use to sell myself (e.g. learning a language, evidence of personal projects, etc.). And from a personal perspective, an employer would be far more impressed with me as a candidate if I could evidence how I was involved in the industry through my own projects than if I had 3 years more experience working a basic part time job. To use your example, who would you take? The person with 2 years and a degree, or the person with 3 years, a degree and a gap in employment where they learned a language, participated in nationally recognised competitions and worked on open source software? I'd certainly take the latter because that gap in employment is perfectly justified.

    While not doing any part time work could be considered a red flag, it's also fair to assume the candidate will have a chance to explain themselves, if they haven't already in their application. It's also perfectly reasonable to not work at uni, considering you're studying full time for a degree. It's completely different to having some arbitrary break when there isn't clearly something else going on. It's quite reductionist to just assume any break in work is a red flag, there's almost always going to be more to it than that.
    I understand where you're coming from and agree, however now you're creating an unfair comparison as you're assuming the person that worked during Uni didn't do any personal projects or learned a new language.

    I simply meant I would take the person without a gap in employment, all other things being equal (ie person 1 went out drinking all weekend, person 2 worked all weekend, not person 1 studied a new language all weekend, person 2 worked all weekend).
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    (Original post by loooopppyyy)
    And therein lies the issue, prospective employers are your future bosses, not your future friends, they will pick the most suitable candidate from a pool of 100+ people, if your not willing to put in the extra effort to stand out from this pool, don't moan when you're not selected...

    Why should someone get a job over someone else that has clearly put in more effort to become employable???
    I'm not saying don't put in a shred of effort, but there has to be a balance between micromanaging your life to look good on a CV and having a good quality of life.

    I'm exactly where I want to be jobwise by the way, and, whilst it isn't like this for everyone, I certainly didn't give a secod thought to my CV whilst at uni. I was there to get a degree and learn and experience, working where appropriate to support that financially.
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    (Original post by loooopppyyy)
    I understand where you're coming from and agree, however now you're creating an unfair comparison as you're assuming the person that worked during Uni didn't do any personal projects or learned a new language.

    I simply meant I would take the person without a gap in employment, all other things being equal (ie person 1 went out drinking all weekend, person 2 worked all weekend, not person 1 studied a new language all weekend, person 2 worked all weekend).
    Ultimately it's impossible to really say since there's no fair way to compare the two people. Hence why you'd want to explain why the gap existed. I'd totally agree that you'd want to take the person who worked over the person who went out drinking. But then I'd take the person who improved themselves over the person who worked, assuming they already had the experience. That's where it falls down, there's all these stupid little criteria to decide some sort of hierachy. Naturally it depends on the person.

    I'm sure we'd both agree that person with experience is better than person without experience. And that person with a gap in their experience isn't necessarily a problem if they can demonstrate something worthwhile happened in their time. Beyond very simplified scenarios like that though it really depends on the exact circumstances.
 
 
 
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