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"I don't have enough time" is crap, yes you do. Watch

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    OP, wait until you get to uni. The workload of A-levels is a total joke in comparison. I had a **** ton of free time during secondary school. Also factor in volunteering and part-time work at uni , which I doubt you will bother with.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    Welcome to my world. The things people will do for money indeed.



    Not at all; I've done three hours of studying today in total. I have time for things because I use the time available in the day without wasting it.
    I don't 'waste' any of my time, it's not up to you to tell me how to spend my time, the way I spend it, is effective and gets me the grades I need and require. You shouldn't generalise students, it's not about being lazy or not.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)

    Like not turning up to lectures, going to the pub, working 8 hours a week at Starbucks and writing incoherent essays. Yeah, real full.
    And who are you talking to?
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    So you use prostitutes at 16, kinda makes me glad i wasn't born into money, now your depression thread all makes sense
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    I'm ****ing a bear as I type this and curing AIDS, beat that.
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    (Original post by habeas.corpus)
    OP, wait until you get to uni. The workload of A-levels is a total joke in comparison. I had a **** ton of free time during secondary school. Also factor in volunteering and part-time work at uni , which I doubt you will bother with.
    If you choose to study a degree in something worthwhile, volunteering becomes unnecessary. I won't need to work part-time, but even if I did, I'm sure I could fit my life around 8 to 16 hours of work a week. Wake up early and do things, do things when you get home, streamline revision and don't waste time on the internet, find more efficient ways of doing things, don't sit and watch Netflix constantly while moaning you have no idea what's happening at university. It's not hard.

    (Original post by Casisalive)
    So you use prostitutes at 16, kinda makes me glad i wasn't born into money, now your depression thread all makes sense
    They're not prostitutes until I convince them to be.

    (Original post by 0to100)
    And who are you talking to?
    The typical student. Of course there are going to be anomalies, like anything.
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    (Original post by habeas.corpus)
    OP, wait until you get to uni. The workload of A-levels is a total joke in comparison. I had a **** ton of free time during secondary school. Also factor in volunteering and part-time work at uni , which I doubt you will bother with.
    You don't even need to study at Alevels unless you're going for the A* A* A* A* A*

    I spent my entire Alevels playing video games, football and messing about. Just studied a bit when the exams came up and got the grades I wanted lol.
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    (Original post by ChickenMadness)
    You don't even need to study at Alevels unless you're going for the A* A* A* A* A*.
    That's what I'm going for, so...
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Well theoretically:

    If you wake up at 7, did 30 minutes of exercise, had a 10 minute shower and ate breakfast in 20 minutes you'd have half an hour spare. It's not exactly unheard of to get up earlier either.

    Your post is a little confusing, are you saying that you work from 1-4 and 5-10? If so that sort of begs the question why are you at uni when you can't afford it without working?

    It does amaze me that so many students go straight to uni and then find themselves needing a part time job to support themselves. Why not work for a few years before uni to make yourself financially stable?

    I'd also assume this is a more packed day for you. If you're spending 9-1 at uni and most student gets 12 hours per week then 1/3 of your week is packed into Thursday. Meaning you'd have plenty of spare time on other days right? It's perfectly fine to have one busy day where you can't get much done but I doubt this is representative of your entire week. If it were then you wouldn't have the time to be posting about it on TSR
    I shower in the evenings and i'm usually 10-15 minutes in the shower then it takes me 40 minutes to dry my hair. Yeah I have two jobs, one where I work at the uni and then one where the uni are sending my out to schools.
    I guess because everyone's always said to me that uni is the next natural step and I didn't want to be miles behind everyone else my age because I took three years out to work in a small job I wouldn't like. I want to progress with my career. It's not my fault the student finance system is a mess and I fall in that annoying bracket where on paper my dad earns alot of money but in reality he realllllly doesn't. I want to finish uni, do my postgrad (which is only six months) and i'll be properly starting my life by the time i'm 22. By which point i'll be wanting to save for a house and a wedding..

    Mondays are my only "day off'" which i spend catching up with work and making sure i'm on top of things. On fridays for example i'm in uni 9-4, then i'll work in the evenings.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    They're not prostitutes until I convince them to be.
    The practice or occupation of engaging in sexual activity with someone for payment. You cant change the definition
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    Because it's Sunday... and you don't work/study full time at university.
    Being a uni student or working full time is really no excuse. If you run the basic numbers it comes out like this:

    Assume full time for both is around 40 hours per week. I'll be generous and say 50 hours instead although uni can be far less.

    Assume you get 8 hours of sleep per night, again I'll be generous and say 10.

    Each day has 24 hours. Take 10 for sleeping leaves 14. Let's take 4 hours for eating, morning routines, etc. That leaves 10 hours per day, or 70 per week. Take the 50 hours leaves you with 20 totally free hours every week. And that was on exagerated numbers. If you get 8 hours of sleep, 4 hours for eating/routines and only spend 40 working it comes out to 44 hours of totally free time. You theoretically have enough time to be a uni student, work full time and have a small amount of free time. But that's unrealistic when you factor in travel times, shopping and so on.

    Having to dedicate 40 hours per week to something is not a big deal. There are 168 hours in a week with maybe 56 of them going to sleep. That leaves 112 hours of time to live your life. Even when you factor in things like eating, washing, shopping and so on it still leaves you with plenty of time.

    As a uni student I'm getting by just fine. I can get up at 7am and have 4pm onwards free every single day. I've also started taking Sundays off. I'm able to fit in 30 hours of university work (either classes or self study) across the week which is more than sufficient for me. Considering I have 6+ hours free every evening and Sundays it really is no excuse.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Being a uni student or working full time is really no excuse. If you run the basic numbers it comes out like this:

    Assume full time for both is around 40 hours per week. I'll be generous and say 50 hours instead although uni can be far less.

    Assume you get 8 hours of sleep per night, again I'll be generous and say 10.

    Each day has 24 hours. Take 10 for sleeping leaves 14. Let's take 4 hours for eating, morning routines, etc. That leaves 10 hours per day, or 70 per week. Take the 50 hours leaves you with 20 totally free hours every week. And that was on exagerated numbers. If you get 8 hours of sleep, 4 hours for eating/routines and only spend 40 working it comes out to 44 hours of totally free time. You theoretically have enough time to be a uni student, work full time and have a small amount of free time. But that's unrealistic when you factor in travel times, shopping and so on.

    Having to dedicate 40 hours per week to something is not a big deal. There are 168 hours in a week with maybe 56 of them going to sleep. That leaves 112 hours of time to live your life. Even when you factor in things like eating, washing, shopping and so on it still leaves you with plenty of time.

    As a uni student I'm getting by just fine. I can get up at 7am and have 4pm onwards free every single day. I've also started taking Sundays off. I'm able to fit in 30 hours of university work (either classes or self study) across the week which is more than sufficient for me. Considering I have 6+ hours free every evening and Sundays it really is no excuse.
    Finally, somebody who gets it. Thank you for your post.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    People, especially students, like to say they don't have enough time to do things like clean, exercise, make meals, study, see friends, shop, etc. These people are not using their time effectively. Wake up an hour early to exercise or clean, do things at set times, be more organised, don't take breaks for hours and hours watching Netflix or sitting on Facebook.

    Today I woke up at 6, made breakfast, did an hour of cardio, showered, cleaned my room, vacuumed the house, took the bins out and packed by bag for tomorrow, all before 8. Then I did laundry, ironing and made lunch for tomorrow. I did a couple of hours of studying, went out to do good shopping, put it all away and that came to 2pm. I've had a friend over since then, and now I'm on an exercise bike while writing this. You do have time, stop moaning you don't.
    Lol, you basically just procrastinated all day doing odd jobs and chatting to your friend, and only studied for a couple of hours :rofl:
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    (Original post by dragonkeeper999)
    Lol, you basically just procrastinated all day doing odd jobs and chatting to your friend, and only studied for a couple of hours :rofl:
    I studied for three hours, exercised for three hours and did everything other people moan they don't have the time to do, like shopping, cleaning, laundry and making meals. What else do you want me to be doing with my day? I've exercised, socialised and done things that needed to be done. I don't need to study for eight hours a day.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    What is everyone else doing then, that they don't have time to do everything they moan about?
    Some of us study around 5 hours on weekends add in a spot of sleep recharging to be able to function for the week at optimum levels, exercise and relaxing, the time flies by without you noticing
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    (Original post by glad-he-ate-her)
    Some of us study around 5 hours on weekends add in a spot of sleep recharging to be able to function for the week at optimum levels, exercise and relaxing, the time flies by without you noticing
    If you studied from 10 until 3:30 with a lunch break, you have the rest of the afternoon, and the entire evening, to do other things. You don't sleep at 3 or 4 in the afternoon for 6 to 8 hours do you?
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    Yes you do have time, if you give up on an ordinary sleep schedule and give into a caffeine addiction
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    I studied for three hours, exercised for three hours and did everything other people moan they don't have the time to do, like shopping, cleaning, laundry and making meals. What else do you want me to be doing with my day? I've exercised, socialised and done things that needed to be done. I don't need to study for eight hours a day.
    Well, today I:

    Studied for 6 hours
    Went grocery shopping (30 mins)
    Made and ate three meals (2 hours)
    Tidied my room (15 mins)
    Met up with friends for a group study session (2 hours, part of 6 hours studying, plus 30 mins cycling to/ from the cafe)
    Went to orchestra rehearsal (3 hours)

    So, I also exercised, socialised, got stuff done, and did a decent amount of studying...

    Also, what uni are you going to/ doss course are you studying if you only need to study a couple of hours a day??? If you think about a degree as a full-time job, you should be spending a minimum of 40 hours a week on it - that's around 6 hours a day over a 7 day week. If you are genuinely passionate about your course and want top grades, add a few more hours a day of extended reading, revision, etc. So yes, you should be studying around 8 hours a day - the point of going to uni is to study, not to faff around doing laundry (why did you even list this??? It takes like 5 mins, you may as well have also listed "had a ****" and "blew my nose" lol...) and socialising all day...
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Being a uni student or working full time is really no excuse. If you run the basic numbers it comes out like this:

    Assume full time for both is around 40 hours per week. I'll be generous and say 50 hours instead although uni can be far less.

    Assume you get 8 hours of sleep per night, again I'll be generous and say 10.

    Each day has 24 hours. Take 10 for sleeping leaves 14. Let's take 4 hours for eating, morning routines, etc. That leaves 10 hours per day, or 70 per week. Take the 50 hours leaves you with 20 totally free hours every week. And that was on exagerated numbers. If you get 8 hours of sleep, 4 hours for eating/routines and only spend 40 working it comes out to 44 hours of totally free time. You theoretically have enough time to be a uni student, work full time and have a small amount of free time. But that's unrealistic when you factor in travel times, shopping and so on.

    Having to dedicate 40 hours per week to something is not a big deal. There are 168 hours in a week with maybe 56 of them going to sleep. That leaves 112 hours of time to live your life. Even when you factor in things like eating, washing, shopping and so on it still leaves you with plenty of time.

    As a uni student I'm getting by just fine. I can get up at 7am and have 4pm onwards free every single day. I've also started taking Sundays off. I'm able to fit in 30 hours of university work (either classes or self study) across the week which is more than sufficient for me. Considering I have 6+ hours free every evening and Sundays it really is no excuse.
    Because you go to Portsmouth university? No offence, but they have it significantly easier in terms of contact hours, workload, difficulty of work. About 6 of my friends went and I'd visit often.

    And again, the maths all sounds good in practice, but in reality it's different.
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    (Original post by Jackieox)
    I shower in the evenings and i'm usually 10-15 minutes in the shower then it takes me 40 minutes to dry my hair. Yeah I have two jobs, one where I work at the uni and then one where the uni are sending my out to schools.
    I guess because everyone's always said to me that uni is the next natural step and I didn't want to be miles behind everyone else my age because I took three years out to work in a small job I wouldn't like. I want to progress with my career. It's not my fault the student finance system is a mess and I fall in that annoying bracket where on paper my dad earns alot of money but in reality he realllllly doesn't. I want to finish uni, do my postgrad (which is only six months) and i'll be properly starting my life by the time i'm 22. By which point i'll be wanting to save for a house and a wedding..

    Mondays are my only "day off'" which i spend catching up with work and making sure i'm on top of things. On fridays for example i'm in uni 9-4, then i'll work in the evenings.
    I can appreciate that the female routine can take a little longer in the morning but 40 minutes drying your hair sounds absurd. I don't want to get into an argument about that since we are never going to understand each other but hair will dry naturally. Hairdryers also speed the process up. That said, if for some reason you absolutely have to spend 40 minutes on it, there's no reason why you can't use that time for something else. Read some uni material, revise something, watch a video on YouTube that advances your knowledge and so on. If you absolutely cannot avoid spending 40 minutes on your hair then use the time to do something useful as well.

    This seems to be a major issue for a lot of people. They just listen to what everyone else says rather than researching things for themselves. Taking a few years out is really not a problem and doesn't place you miles behind everyone. It is NOT a race. There's also no need to take 3 years out. Work a part time job at college to save a bit and then work full time for one year. That would give you a solid foundation to work with. I spent the standard 2 years at college, then spent an extra 2 years at college and took a gap year. I worked (mostly part time) for 4 of those years. By your standards I'm now 3 years behind my friends, who all left uni as I started. Does it matter? Not in the slightest. I can drive while they can't. I've got more work experience. I'd also say coming into uni that bit more mature has helped. There are plenty of benefits that most people simply don't consider. You've got 50 years to work on your career. Stop trying to rush your life.

    No, I agree, the student finance system for some people is a total mess. But this is something you would have known about if you'd researched before going to uni. Knowing that uni wasn't financially viable without working so much and then choosing to go anyone is arguably very irresponsible. Luckily you have the option to support yourself but by your own admission it isn't ideal. If you choose to do things you can't afford in the future you'll find yourself in debt.

    Your uni hours simply don't add up. 9-4 is 7 hours, add the 4 from earlier is 11. Unless you have Tuesdays and Wednesdays off as well you're spending a lot of time at uni, which I assume could be down to free sessions that you can't go home for or some other similar situation. At which point you have free time to use.

    I hope this doesn't sound like I'm having a go or anything, I just really can't understand why you don't have free time. If the uni is sending you out to school I'd assume that comes under the hours you need to spend on uni work each week, I may be in a similar position next year. The numbers just don't add up right now.
 
 
 
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