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"I don't have enough time" is crap, yes you do. Watch

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    (Original post by Glassapple)
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    To put it in a nutshell and in short: everything what we need is a good organization of ourselves for our everyday life. Indeed, being planned faciliates to get an overview about important things, to do first things first and thus to have more time for leisure time.

    Agree.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    It's simple ad hominem. Your argument is somehow less valid because of you, rather than a flaw with your argument. It's the sort of thing people do when they don't have a counter argument.

    That said you're preaching to a lost cause. The people that are capable of good time management generally already are. Those that aren't don't like having their flaws pointed out and aren't going to change, no matter what. There's a very small number of people who will be impacted but they're lost under the masses.

    The simple fact is we can't have a society where everyone is able to improve themselves so dramatically. We'd end up with too many chiefs and not enough indians. Trying to help others change themselves is only worthwhile when they want to change. Most people are scared of change and don't want to change. It's usually impossible for one party to understand the others viewpoint.
    I have moved over from the disorganised to the more. Organised and still making improvements.

    I have a lot of issues with the main stream consensus that you can only work 40 hours a week otherwise you become in effective or you can only work for 45 mins straight or etc it's nonsense.

    Some people I know have worked 80 hour weeks and done just fine. In there past people used to work longer hours still. Not saying I want that but I know it's possible.

    If you want something badly enough you will make it happen if you don't you won't.
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    Please tell that to my depression and executive dysfunction.
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    (Original post by jeanprouvaire)
    Please tell that to my depression and executive dysfunction.
    Arguably neither are stopping you from doing things. They make it harder but they're not necessarily preventative.

    Depression sucks but that doesn't mean you just have to live with it. Get professional help. Being willing to justify things like a lack of time because of depression is exactly the sort of thinking that results in more depression. It's the classic negative spiral. You have depression, everything sucks, you can't do what you want, everything sucks more and so on. Allowing depression to control your life is exactly how you won't get better. Not letting depression get the better of you is the road to recovery.

    Saying you don't have time because you have depression is fueling the depression. The time is irrelevant, the problem lies in the depression which can be dealt with.

    Can't really comment on executive dysfunction since it's more complicated and I don't have any experience. Similar things would apply though, it shouldn't be an excuse.

    Also worth mentioning that these things tend to apply to everyday people, not those with unique conditions. If you have something serious, like depression or you've broken your leg then you'd need to deal with getting better first. Saying you don't have time when there's something serious wrong is fine providing you are trying to do something about it
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    Unemployed and scrounging off your parents. So impressive!
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    (Original post by midnightice)
    Unemployed and scrounging off your parents. So impressive!
    I do go to school Monday to Friday and study, it's not like I don't do anything at all. It's probably more than the average student who has two or three lectures a week from 11 until 3 who doesn't turn up to half of them anyway, then wastes the rest of their time in bed or at the pub.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Arguably neither are stopping you from doing things. They make it harder but they're not necessarily preventative.

    Depression sucks but that doesn't mean you just have to live with it. Get professional help. Being willing to justify things like a lack of time because of depression is exactly the sort of thinking that results in more depression. It's the classic negative spiral. You have depression, everything sucks, you can't do what you want, everything sucks more and so on. Allowing depression to control your life is exactly how you won't get better. Not letting depression get the better of you is the road to recovery.

    Saying you don't have time because you have depression is fueling the depression. The time is irrelevant, the problem lies in the depression which can be dealt with.

    Can't really comment on executive dysfunction since it's more complicated and I don't have any experience. Similar things would apply though, it shouldn't be an excuse.

    Also worth mentioning that these things tend to apply to everyday people, not those with unique conditions. If you have something serious, like depression or you've broken your leg then you'd need to deal with getting better first. Saying you don't have time when there's something serious wrong is fine providing you are trying to do something about it
    No, no, you're missing the point. I got 3 early unconditional offers, including one to my first choice uni, based on academic excellence. I have a clean sweep of A*/A GCSEs. I work extremely hard on a daily basis just to be up to the same level, functionally, as these "average people"! But I know that if someone was watching my life, a la reality shows, they'd most likely see me flopping about everywhere, struggling to finish work in class, lying in bed inert for hours, etc. From the perspective of OP and other people I would be considered lazy and not working hard enough, which is something I have had to deal with on a number of occasions!

    (Rather than viewing my depression as an excuse, I think it's actually a reasonable response. There are things I can't do because of my mental health, or at the very least things I can't justifiably manage within a reasonable timeframe. And that's realistic! I'm an overachiever with anxiety problems and I don't like hearing that I can't do things, but it's true that I can't do everything! And I probably will never be OP with their cardio and clean lifestyle. And that's fine, because as long as I'm chugging along I'm pretty content with my life.)

    I think it's worth noting that more people have mental health issues than you might presume - I don't have statistics for the UK, unfortunately, but in America, 30% of uni students surveyed had strongly considered suicide, which even with leeway would suggest a much larger number of folks struggling than one might expect. Tl;dr: maybe people have things going on in their lives, and it's difficult to judge a person's work ethic and mental state simply from judging what you see them do.

    My depression is a recurring thing that isn't going away any time soon! I've been on meds, I've gotten professional help, and I'm in a stronger place right now than I have been for a while. It's easier for me to deal with carrying on with my life right now, anyway. Sorry for the ramble!
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    I do go to school Monday to Friday and study, it's not like I don't do anything at all. It's probably more than the average student who has two or three lectures a week from 11 until 3, who doesn't turn up to half of them anyway, then wastes the rest of their time in bed or at the pub.
    Kind of got to agree with glassapple here, If his parents have worked hard to earn money then their arrangement with their child or children is their business and is not the anyone else business.

    Its better then people who mess around whilst been wholly subsidized by the tax payer. His parents consent to supporting him through education which their is nothing wrong with. Not all Taxpayers consent to their money been taken from them to give to Lazy students to use to get drunk with.
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    (Original post by AshEntropy)
    > Gets 14 A*s at GCSE
    > Instantly gets a superiority complex
    > Starts lecturing people on how to live their life

    OP in a nutshell
    What do you mean with living the life exactly? being organized by making appointments?

    It is very kind of you, if you giving advices when people asked for. Otherwise it is pushy.
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    (Original post by jeanprouvaire)
    No, no, you're missing the point. I got 3 early unconditional offers, including one to my first choice uni, based on academic excellence. I have a clean sweep of A*/A GCSEs. I work extremely hard on a daily basis just to be up to the same level, functionally, as these "average people"! But I know that if someone was watching my life, a la reality shows, they'd most likely see me flopping about everywhere, struggling to finish work in class, lying in bed inert for hours, etc. From the perspective of OP and other people I would be considered lazy and not working hard enough, which is something I have had to deal with on a number of occasions!

    (Rather than viewing my depression as an excuse, I think it's actually a reasonable response. There are things I can't do because of my mental health, or at the very least things I can't justifiably manage within a reasonable timeframe. And that's realistic! I'm an overachiever with anxiety problems and I don't like hearing that I can't do things, but it's true that I can't do everything! And I probably will never be OP with their cardio and clean lifestyle. And that's fine, because as long as I'm chugging along I'm pretty content with my life.)

    I think it's worth noting that more people have mental health issues than you might presume - I don't have statistics for the UK, unfortunately, but in America, 30% of uni students surveyed had strongly considered suicide, which even with leeway would suggest a much larger number of folks struggling than one might expect. Tl;dr: maybe people have things going on in their lives, and it's difficult to judge a person's work ethic and mental state simply from judging what you see them do.

    My depression is a recurring thing that isn't going away any time soon! I've been on meds, I've gotten professional help, and I'm in a stronger place right now than I have been for a while. It's easier for me to deal with carrying on with my life right now, anyway. Sorry for the ramble!
    Perhaps I did miss the point, but then I wouldn't personally class you in the same category as the people this thread was aimed at.

    This thread seems to be aimed at people who complain that they don't have enough time and then also complain that they don't succeed. You have neither mentioned explicitly about not having enough time and have clearly done very well. The entire thread isn't aimed at people like you.

    How other people view you is largely irrelevant, as is any medical conditions, disorders, etc. Your grades speak for themselves so by all means keep doing what you are doing. Depression in particular creates avery unique condition. Nobody who understands what you are going through would call you lazy because you are doing it in the way that best suits you. Having depression is an excuse but it's perfectly justifiable. And I don't imagine you'd actually tell someone you don't have enough time. That would seem like the wrong excuse.

    The thread in general seems to be aimed at people who are lazy, more than people with a justifiable condition. Nobody here would berate someone with a broken leg for taking too long. Similar story for depression and other mental disorders. But in those cases people don't tend to say they don't have time. For these people it's because they're not able.

    And that's all it boils down to. People that say they don't have time are making excuses. They don't want to make time. Someone with depression or a broken leg would generally not say they don't have time. They'd say they aren't able. Not having time almost always boils down to a lack of comittment, poor time management or some other avoidable characteristic. It's really a matter of semantics I guess.

    Rough numbers for the UK say 17% of people have had suicidal thoughts at some point in their life (frankly I'd expect that to be higher) with around 25% of UK citizens experiencing a mental problem each year. It's absolutely a massive and growing issue.
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    Very true. When you have your priorities right you find the time. During my A levels I studied 4 A2 subjects (incl art which has a huge workload) plus working, plus two volunteer roles and ad hoc volunteering in between, plus running 10 miles a day, plus yoga 1-2 x a day, plus having a boyfriend - and I still had 'down time'. There are a lot of hours in the day, the only problem is when you spend a large amount of them sleeping/facebooking/watching netflix they disappear fast.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Depression sucks but that doesn't mean you just have to live with it. Get professional help. Being willing to justify things like a lack of time because of depression is exactly the sort of thinking that results in more depression. It's the classic negative spiral. You have depression, everything sucks, you can't do what you want, everything sucks more and so on. Allowing depression to control your life is exactly how you won't get better. Not letting depression get the better of you is the road to recovery.
    Wow okay, clearly you have never had depression. You're basically telling someone to "cheer the **** up", and that is easier said than done. Depression can't just be beaten on it's own, it takes time and whilst the individual is suffering, time goes twice as slow and even the most simplest of things - showering, for example - can be increasingly difficult. I'd like to see you do a structured and productive routine whilst suffering with severe depression.

    (Original post by Acsel)
    Similar things would apply though, it shouldn't be an excuse.
    Oh please, "depression isn't an excuse." Depression demobilises people, and you should take that into consideration. Stop being so pretentious, middle-class ****.
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    (Original post by thedayismyenxmy)
    Wow okay, clearly you have never had depression. You're basically telling someone to "cheer the **** up", and that is easier said than done. Depression can't just be beaten on it's own, it takes time and whilst the individual is suffering, time goes twice as slow and even the most simplest of things - showering, for example - can be increasingly difficult. I'd like to see you do a structured and productive routine whilst suffering with severe depression.



    Oh please, "depression isn't an excuse." Depression demobilises people, and you should take that into consideration. Stop being so pretentious, middle-class ****.
    I have depression, I take meds daily and go to weekly counselling. It doesn't mean I can't make time for things that need to be done. Often the best thing I can do for my depression is throw myself into something productive. I force myself to get on with things and get everything done because I refuse to let my depression define me.
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    Some people have lives... you know, a social life....
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    People, especially students, like to say they don't have enough time to do things like clean, exercise, make meals, study, see friends, shop, etc. These people are not using their time effectively. Wake up an hour early to exercise or clean, do things at set times, be more organised, don't take breaks for hours and hours watching Netflix or sitting on Facebook.

    Today I woke up at 6, made breakfast, did an hour of cardio, showered, cleaned my room, vacuumed the house, took the bins out and packed by bag for tomorrow, all before 8. Then I did laundry, ironing and made lunch for tomorrow. I did a couple of hours of studying, went out to do food shopping, put it all away and that came to 2pm. I've had a friend over since then, and now I'm on an exercise bike while writing this. You do have time, stop moaning you don't.
    Yes this is exactly the right attitude to have! Very refreshing. If only more people shared your work ethic.
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    (Original post by epoddoulc)
    Some people have lives... you know, a social life....
    As do I, I said on that day I was with a friend for about seven hours. A 'social life' is not wasting every night getting drunk at the pub, or hanging around the park pratting about in the cold. I'm at school today, I have stuff to do at home afterwards which will take a few hours, tonight I'm going to the theatre with a friend, then I have school tomorrow.

    (Original post by kalclash)
    Yes this is exactly the right attitude to have! Very refreshing. If only more people shared your work ethic.
    Thank you! Some people get it!
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    I don't have time to read this thread
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    (Original post by Kravence)
    I don't have time to read this thread
    You have time to sarcastically post in it, you may as well read it.
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    (Original post by thedayismyenxmy)
    Wow okay, clearly you have never had depression. You're basically telling someone to "cheer the **** up", and that is easier said than done. Depression can't just be beaten on it's own, it takes time and whilst the individual is suffering, time goes twice as slow and even the most simplest of things - showering, for example - can be increasingly difficult. I'd like to see you do a structured and productive routine whilst suffering with severe depression.
    I've had depression and I know what it feels like. I was fortunate enough to get over it with willpower alone because I refused to get help. I've considered suicide. Even now I can find myself in a pretty *****y place for no apparent reason. So I'd appreciate if you could be a little more civil.

    I'm not telling anyone to cheer up. That would be stupid and is not a way to get over depression. Fighting depression is horrible and not everyone succeeds. Some people live with it all their lives. But to say it can't be beaten by itself is absurd. I and many others have done it. Not everyone can and most people won't get through it without help, which is what I recommend. I'm merely saying that it's important to appreciate that if you let depression control you it'll get worse. Being defeatist because of depression fuels the depression. Part of breaking that cycle involves changing how you think. Some people need help to do that.

    You're absolutely right about not being able to have a structured and productive routine with depression. I certainly didn't. But that's not what I'm suggesting. I'm saying deal with the depression first. Having gone through that myself, having come to terms with depression and made my peace with it, I am now far better than I ever was.



    (Original post by thedayismyenxmy)
    Oh please, "depression isn't an excuse." Depression demobilises people, and you should take that into consideration. Stop being so pretentious, middle-class ****.
    I am taking it into consideration. The entire point of this thread is about people who use the excuse of "I don't have time" to avoid doing things. Saying you don't have time because you have depression is ignoring the problem and using depression as an excuse. The time is irrelevant. The reason you can't do something is because of the depression, not because you don't have the time. It's skirting around the real issue.

    The whole point, since you took that entirely out of context is that if you have depression, or something else wrong then you have a legitimate reason for not being able to do something, rather than using lack of time and depression as excuses. However choosing to say you can't do X because of depression is not dealing with the actual problem (the depression) and more than using "lack of time" deals with the problem (lack of commitment). Furthermore it only serves to inflict harm.

    Yes, depression demobilises people. But if you say you can't do X because you have depression and don't choose to do anything about it then your situation won't change. Depression creates a defeatist attitude which in itself is not helpful.

    Give someone with "lack of time" more time and they still won't do whatever it is. Lack of time is merely an excuse for the underlying problem.

    Deal with someone's depression and they will do the thing. Depression is not an excuse, it IS the underlying problem. Like I said before this is an issue of semantics. Someone with a broken leg won't play football. The broken leg is not an excuse, it's literally preventing them from playing. In the same way depression is not an excuse, it is the thing preventing someone from doing something.

    I'm not sure if I should be honoured or offended that you think I'm middle class. I can only guess at what the word under the asterisks is but it's pretty laughable that you would think calling someone middle class is an insult.
 
 
 
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