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    I'm so confused by this! I want to study International relations. There are courses where I can study IR on its own OR I can do a joint honours one such as IR and Politics.
    Does that mean I study politics on its own the way Politics majors do and then IR on its own, OR do I study them both and also how they link together?
    I also love Russian and I would like to be an ambassador for Russia or something likewise, but i already know Russian because my mothers side of the family is of Russian descent. Muy if I study IR + a language and choose Russian, does that mean I study Russian as a language then so?
    I'm so confused!
    Thank you for your answers

    p.s - I am from Ireland and I want to go to Trinity College Dublin, Univeristy of Edinburgh or University of St.Andrews. I might apply to Oxbridge/Russel group but I've no money so I'll only apply if I can get out a big loan to fund that😂
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    (Original post by Combetlee)
    I'm so confused by this! I want to study International relations. There are courses where I can study IR on its own OR I can do a joint honours one such as IR and Politics.
    Does that mean I study politics on its own the way Politics majors do and then IR on its own, OR do I study them both and also how they link together?
    I also love Russian and I would like to be an ambassador for Russia or something likewise, but i already know Russian because my mothers side of the family is of Russian descent. Muy if I study IR + a language and choose Russian, does that mean I study Russian as a language then so?
    I'm so confused!
    Thank you for your answers

    p.s - I am from Ireland and I want to go to Trinity College Dublin, Univeristy of Edinburgh or University of St.Andrews. I might apply to Oxbridge/Russel group but I've no money so I'll only apply if I can get out a big loan to fund that😂
    Joint honours are degree in which you learn half of both subject compared to their singular degree. If the degree title has 'with' then you'll major in the first subject before 'with'. Doing a joint honours does not hold any advantages or disadvantages, it all depends on what you want to do with it in which it will be an advantage or not .

    I'm confused on the next bit. Do you want to learn a language along with your degree to get a qualification in it? If so, then you can do a joint honour or major in IR. If not, then every universities offer language services for those interested in learning a language
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    If you study International Relations and/with Russian, you will have to learn the language from scratch. (This is only the case for Russian and other rarer languages like Japanese. For example, you can only take French from A-level.) Since you already know it, I recommend you choose another language as your fluency can be explained.

    'And' means you study the two subjects in equal proportion.

    'With' means you study the first subject about 66.5%-75% of the time and the other subject 25%-33.5% of the time (you major in one and minor in another).

    As the above poster mentioned, most universities have a language learning service whether you take a language or not.

    You do not study how they are linked together. You take some modules from a subject and the others from the second subject (e.g. you will not have a class about the importance of Russian in international relations, you will just learn them separately).

    Joint honours can be better if they link together very well (e.g. International Relations and Arabic) or if they fit the person best (e.g. someone has a passion for both history and biology, so they take a degree in Biology and History). I do not know how employers view them, sadly.

    However, I think Politics and International Relations/International Relations and Politics is not exactly a joint honours degree. As far as I know, it seems to count as a single honours degree since a lot of the modules are on the same topics. I may be wrong, though.

    OP, if you take a joint honours degree and are fluent in Russian, I recommend you do not pick Russian since you will just get bored in class while 'learning' basic things like pronouns. Pick something that you do not already know.
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    (Original post by Combetlee)
    I'm so confused by this! I want to study International relations. There are courses where I can study IR on its own OR I can do a joint honours one such as IR and Politics.
    Does that mean I study politics on its own the way Politics majors do and then IR on its own, OR do I study them both and also how they link together?
    I also love Russian and I would like to be an ambassador for Russia or something likewise, but i already know Russian because my mothers side of the family is of Russian descent. Muy if I study IR + a language and choose Russian, does that mean I study Russian as a language then so?
    I'm so confused!
    Thank you for your answers

    p.s - I am from Ireland and I want to go to Trinity College Dublin, Univeristy of Edinburgh or University of St.Andrews. I might apply to Oxbridge/Russel group but I've no money so I'll only apply if I can get out a big loan to fund that😂
    A joint honours degree just means that you study half of one subject and half of the other (or another percentage, e.g. 75:25 ratio for your major: minor subjects). It is the same workload and level of qualification as a single honours degree. However, it does have the benefits of letting you study two subjects to university level, which is good if you are undecided between two subjects you enjoy or if the two subjects are closely related. It is quite common for people to do a joint honours degree with a minor in a language, however this is not a requirement and if you are already fluent in Russian then you probably wouldn't be allowed to do this/ it would be a waste of time.

    In terms of whether you study the links between the two subjects of a joint honours degree, usually no. Essentially, you take some modules from the single honours degrees of each subject, e.g. if you studied Politics with International Relations in a 75:25 ratio and each single honours subject usually has eight modules a year (I'm just making this up btw, each university has different numbers of modules), you would take 6 modules of Politics and 2 modules of International Relations. Overall, you study 8 modules - so no extra work compared to the single honours degree, just a greater range of subjects. Every university webpage should list the possible module options for the single and joint honours degree options
 
 
 
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