Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Does Dairy affect skin? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Cause spots?
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    Moved to health.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by emerald7770)
    Cause spots?
    Seems it could at least contribute in some cases. There's certainly enough info on google to suggest it could. I guess it's best for you to look at the info yourself and decide if you think it is a factor for you (if that's why you're asking). Here's one link I found that says it does... http://www.clearskinforever.net/milk...lk-cause-acne/
    It seems a suggestion for solving acne caused by dairy is to cut out dairy (no surprise there). If you are going to consider anything like cutting dairy out of you diet, please approach it logically. Think about what you will need to do to still get all you need from your diet, and treat it as a trial to start with. Keep a record of your acne severity before you try cutting out dairy and for a while after you cut out dairy- maybe even take pictures- and compare your findings. If you don't notice much difference, it's probably not worth it.

    Anyway, hope that helps.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    The link above provided is rubbish. It is a commercial enterprise and has no scientific or factual credibility.

    There is no scientific evidence to support a claim that dairy products affect the skin. Period.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Reality Check)
    The link above provided is rubbish. It is a commercial enterprise and has no scientific or factual credibility.

    There is no scientific evidence to support a claim that dairy products affect the skin. Period.
    I watched a video of a girl and she said cutting dairy out of her life caused her spots to go?? and people in the comments were like "shes not lying" idk? I want to try it but i eat and drink dairy 24/7. pretty hard to cut it out
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kindred)
    Seems it could at least contribute in some cases. There's certainly enough info on google to suggest it could. I guess it's best for you to look at the info yourself and decide if you think it is a factor for you (if that's why you're asking). Here's one link I found that says it does... http://www.clearskinforever.net/milk...lk-cause-acne/
    It seems a suggestion for solving acne caused by dairy is to cut out dairy (no surprise there). If you are going to consider anything like cutting dairy out of you diet, please approach it logically. Think about what you will need to do to still get all you need from your diet, and treat it as a trial to start with. Keep a record of your acne severity before you try cutting out dairy and for a while after you cut out dairy- maybe even take pictures- and compare your findings. If you don't notice much difference, it's probably not worth it.

    Anyway, hope that helps.
    Thanks so much! I'll try that alone to see if it actually works. Maybe for a month???
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by emerald7770)
    I watched a video of a girl and she said cutting dairy out of her life caused her spots to go?? and people in the comments were like "shes not lying" idk? I want to try it but i eat and drink dairy 24/7. pretty hard to cut it out
    Please note what you've just said - 'you watched a video...and people in the comments'.

    A random girl posting a random video with other random people making comments doesn't mean that it's fact, or based in any sort of scientific evidence. I understand that you're probably young, but it's really important to be able to clearly define between social media and evidence-based health research.

    Please don't automatically believe what you see in videos or social media comments. Use credible sources such as the NHS or gov.uk website to find out the correct information.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Reality Check)
    Please note what you've just said - 'you watched a video...and people in the comments'.

    A random girl posting a random video with other random people making comments doesn't mean that it's fact, or based in any sort of scientific evidence. I understand that you're probably young, but it's really important to be able to clearly define between social media and evidence-based health research.

    Please don't automatically believe what you see in videos or social media comments. Use credible sources such as the NHS or gov.uk website to find out the correct information.
    Okay is this scientific enough?
    Most of the cows used in farming are actually pregnant cows. The hormones such as progesterone and insulin growth factors make their way into the milk, when we consume the milk, it leads to increased levels of inflammation, skin breakdown, aging and acne in many people.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by emerald7770)
    Okay is this scientific enough?
    Most of the cows used in farming are actually pregnant cows. The hormones such as progesterone and insulin growth factors make their way into the milk, when we consume the milk, it leads to increased levels of inflammation, skin breakdown, aging and acne in many people.
    No.

    What levels of these hormones and IGF are found in the milk?

    What evidence is there that ingestion of these hormones is harmful to human health - what mechanisms are involved?

    How does ingestion of these substances lead to the outcomes you quote - inflammation, skin breakdown (!), aging and acne? What evidence is there to support these outlandish claims?

    Without being able to support these points with credible scientific evidence, there is no reason to believe your claims. But you're not bothered about all that are you?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Reality Check)
    No.

    What levels of these hormones and IGF are found in the milk?

    What evidence is there that ingestion of these hormones is harmful to human health - what mechanisms are involved?

    How does ingestion of these substances lead to the outcomes you quote - inflammation, skin breakdown (!), aging and acne? What evidence is there to support these outlandish claims?

    Without being able to support these points with credible scientific evidence, there is no reason to believe your claims. But you're not bothered about all that are you?
    Yes i am bothered about this.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by emerald7770)
    Yes i am bothered about this.
    Good - I'm really pleased that you are
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Reality Check)
    Good - I'm really pleased that you are
    Are you actually pleased or are you just being sarcastic?
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by emerald7770)
    Thanks so much! I'll try that alone to see if it actually works. Maybe for a month???
    Yeah that sounds like a good amount of time.
    I would like to mention though that I think milk is probably an unlikely cause. I believe milk is filtered extensively before being sold to remove the stuff people suggest would cause acne. I would do some research first to make sure it isn't just people making silly things up.
    You might also like to try natural (or medical) remedies before you remove dairy from your diet to see if a simple things could fix it (even if the milk is causing it).
    I've heard sugar scrub is good and have had positive experience personally with teatree exfoliant (you can get it at body shop).

    Good luck with whatever you try though.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by emerald7770)
    Are you actually pleased or are you just being sarcastic?
    No, I'm not being sarcastic! I'm genuinely pleased that you're going to question what you read/hear - I'm a scientist. It's my job to get people to not accept uncritically what people read about health claims.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kindred)
    Yeah that sounds like a good amount of time.
    I would like to mention though that I think milk is probably an unlikely cause. I believe milk is filtered extensively before being sold to remove the stuff people suggest would cause acne. I would do some research first to make sure it isn't just people making silly things up.
    You might also like to try natural (or medical) remedies before you remove dairy from your diet to see if a simple things could fix it (even if the milk is causing it).
    I've heard sugar scrub is good and have had positive experience personally with teatree exfoliant (you can get it at body shop).

    Good luck with whatever you try though.
    You're kind, thank you!!!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Reality Check)
    No, I'm not being sarcastic! I'm genuinely pleased that you're going to question what you read/hear - I'm a scientist. It's my job to get people to not accept uncritically what people read about health claims.
    Oh, well you should've said. Thanks
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    It can do, but the very best way to know for sure is to eliminate it (perhaps for a month), and then keep record of what happens when you reintroduce it

    I'm sure some TSRers will freak out about that suggestion, but there are no health downsides to going without dairy for a month, assuming you other nutritious foods. Whereas there could be a health downside in your specific case to consuming dairy.
    Even doctors recommend elimination diets when attempting to diagnose allergies and intolerances in some cases. If you think about it, it's also the most scientific way to discern the truth
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by emerald7770)
    Okay is this scientific enough?
    Most of the cows used in farming are actually pregnant cows. The hormones such as progesterone and insulin growth factors make their way into the milk, when we consume the milk, it leads to increased levels of inflammation, skin breakdown, aging and acne in many people.
    Angry cucumber
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    We're totally going to have a pointless rant in here about whether or not hormones in milk are a problem, aren't we? :dry:

    Aside from hormones, caseine and lactose are both known allergens. That's not something that there's any scientific disagreement about. For the purpose of the OP's needs... which aren't to settle the specifics of some obscure nutrition debate, but rather to work out whether her specific body responds to dairy... all of that is rather unecessary.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    We're totally going to have a pointless rant in here about whether or not hormones in milk are a problem, aren't we? :dry:

    Aside from hormones, caseine and lactose are both known allergens. That's not something that there's any scientific disagreement about. For the purpose of the OP's needs... which aren't to settle the specifics of some obscure nutrition debate, but rather to work out whether her specific body responds to dairy... all of that is rather unecessary.
    It's not pointless if there are uniformed individuals reading who can learn something from potential debate.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: February 2, 2017
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.