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    Hi everyone!

    I'm currently 1 of 10 students on the foundation year at Lady Margaret Hall (Oxford University).

    Please feel free to ask any questions about the application, the course or anything else!

    So far I'm having the most amazing time and I would really encourage people to apply
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    What are you studying and are you guaranteed a place next year at the university?
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    (Original post by vividviolets)
    What are you studying and are you guaranteed a place next year at the university?
    I'm studying music - but you can study most subjects on the foundation year (the list of them are on the website) https://lmhfoundationyear.com/

    I'm afraid it does not guarantee you a place. But it certainly gives you a much better chance of getting a place. All the tutors are on your side and do everything they can to help you get the place. A similar course is run at Trinity Dublin and 9/10 applications get onto the undergraduate degree and it's expected it will be the same here.

    Unfortunately the foundation students have to apply via ucas - of course you would put Oxford as your first choice and pick four other unis. However, last term when applying, it was amazing the amount of help I received on my personal statement and lots of interview practice from some of the tutors themselves. I also got help from many 2nd and 3rd year students and they gave me practice interviews and feedback. Overall, if you get into the foundation year, you are already half way there essentially.

    If you receive an offer, the condition is completing the foundation year working at minimum 2.1 standard. This is instead of having to get AAA or A*AA.

    I hope I answered your question - do ask away if you have any more
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    (Original post by howardbakerd123)
    Hi everyone!

    I'm currently 1 of 10 students on the foundation year at Lady Margaret Hall (Oxford University).

    Please feel free to ask any questions about the application, the course or anything else!

    So far I'm having the most amazing time and I would really encourage people to apply
    Hi,

    Do you have any idea of what amount of people apply for the foundation year? What are the admissions tutors looking for in general?

    How important is your circumstance to the application? I meet all of the criteria and have quite bad GCSEs, however, I do not have a substantial personal reason for that, other than being at a quite bad school and being around friends that weren't the best influence.
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    (Original post by goatygoat)
    Hi,

    Do you have any idea of what amount of people apply for the foundation year? What are the admissions tutors looking for in general?

    How important is your circumstance to the application? I meet all of the criteria and have quite bad GCSEs, however, I do not have a substantial personal reason for that, other than being at a quite bad school and being around friends that weren't the best influence.
    Hi!

    I'm aware that 90 people applied last year for 12 places. I know it seems a lot but there were some who applied that weren't eligible (didn't meet the criteria) 30 people were interviewed after.

    The tutors are looking for applicants that are bright, have an inquiring mind and have done well academically despite having obstacles in their life.

    They'll look at your GCSEs. But I think what's more important is your AS grades, because that gives them to best idea of your most recent academic attainment. It is best to be averaging at BBB or a bit lower - I got quite a bit lower: I got ACD for my AS levels. But I managed to improve them at A2 level to average at BBB. They will see the grades in light of your circumstances and the obstacles you've had or have in your life.

    Your circumstances are very important as it's exactly the reason why the foundation year was launched. If you meet the criteria and have a substantial personal reason then apply! This is exactly what they're looking for.

    Please feel free to ask any more questions
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    Hi,
    Do you happen to know what kind of questions they'll be asking at the interview and if there is more than one interview?
    Thanks
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    (Original post by Kevin Fdo)
    Hi,
    Do you happen to know what kind of questions they'll be asking at the interview and if there is more than one interview?
    Thanks
    Hi!

    All the foundation students this year had just one interview, as it's only at one college - I'm sure it would be the same this year

    The interviews are conducted in a similar way to the Oxford interviews - basically trying to see how well you can think on your feet, how you respond to the tutorial system (the interview is like a mini-tutorial), and how well you engage with your subject. But they make it a little easier than the actual Oxford one.

    Before my interview, I had to read a short essay and look at a piece of music for an hour. That formed the discussion for most my interview. The tutor tried to see if I had understood what I had read and the key arguments. I was also asked about important features in the piece of music I was given. I said 'I dunno' and I didn't know what to say so many times. But the tutor always gave me prompts and helped to develop it into a discussion. It is less like an interview, and more just a discussion about your subject. I'm sure they'd do the equivalent in other subjects - e.g. for English you may be given a poem to look at. But for some subjects they won't give you something to look at before the interview. For example, I know a foundation year physics student went straight into the interview and they gave her problems to look at then.

    I was also asked to expand on points in the personal statement I wrote for the foundation year.

    However, it was different from an actual Oxford interview - at the end they asked me questions about my background and obstacles I had faced.

    I hope that helped
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    Hi,

    Have you gotten a place at Oxford for 2017 entry and if so for what course? Also, one more question, what were you A2 grades like?
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    Hey David! Just butting in to post this video of Vee

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    Hi there.
    I am currently applying to LMH foundation year and need a little help writing the short essay. It says it cant be the same as your personal statement for UCAS so im baffled what to write. Do you have any tips and hints to what they are looking for ? What did you talk about in your essay ?
    Thanksss
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    (Original post by habiento)
    Hi,

    Have you gotten a place at Oxford for 2017 entry and if so for what course? Also, one more question, what were you A2 grades like?
    I have got a place at Oxford for 2017. It is a conditional offer based on completing the foundation year averaging at 2:1 level.

    I got A* in music, C in History and C in Physics. It averaged out as 3 Bs luckily which was what I needed to get a place on the foundation year.
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    (Original post by xmeeniemox)
    Specifically what kind of topics do you cover which are non subject based?
    We have lessons with the principal, where we discuss issues related to media - e.g. we have talked about Brexit, Donald Trump, a local murder case. He takes us on trips and gets us doing really interesting stuff. We write essays for him some weeks.

    Also we have lessons on critical thinking and academic writing - we write essays most weeks on a variety of issues. For example, my essay this week was 'Can graffiti be considered art?'. The main focus is improving your general writing skills, coherence and the clarity of the way you argue.

    Throughout each term we have a few sessions to do with spoken communication. Last term we were writing speeches and this term we had a formal debate.

    We've also had sessions on time management, note taking, using word and power point, coding and many other things.

    I hope that's helped!
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    Hello, I have just received an invite to interview for the Foundation Year and I am so incredibly happy! I just wondered if you had any tips/pointers on what the interview will be like and the best way to prepare for it please? It's for Psychology
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    Hello!
    I have been extremely lucky enough to be shortlisted for an interview this year! The course I want to do is French. I am very excited and proud but also nervous ! My question for you is, how much emphasis in the interview is put on the questions such as , why do you want to do this subject, what do you know about it, what have you read around this subject etc.
    Also, I am a little lost with my two page response to a piece of French literature or a film - should this response be analysis with references or opinions and summaries of key points or themes? Or is the idea to see what our interpretation of a written response would be? It's all very intriguing and exciting !
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    (Original post by howardbakerd123)
    We have lessons with the principal, where we discuss issues related to media - e.g. we have talked about Brexit, Donald Trump, a local murder case. He takes us on trips and gets us doing really interesting stuff. We write essays for him some weeks.

    Also we have lessons on critical thinking and academic writing - we write essays most weeks on a variety of issues. For example, my essay this week was 'Can graffiti be considered art?'. The main focus is improving your general writing skills, coherence and the clarity of the way you argue.

    Throughout each term we have a few sessions to do with spoken communication. Last term we were writing speeches and this term we had a formal debate.

    We've also had sessions on time management, note taking, using word and power point, coding and many other things.

    I hope that's helped!
    This sounds amazing - particularly the lessons with the principal and the critical thinking essays! Very helpful.
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    (Original post by Marniandrews)
    Hello, I have just received an invite to interview for the Foundation Year and I am so incredibly happy! I just wondered if you had any tips/pointers on what the interview will be like and the best way to prepare for it please? It's for Psychology
    Hi!

    Sorry for the delayed reply - I hope this get's to you in time for your interview.

    The interview is similar to the actual Oxford one but will be slightly easier - plus they'll have lower expectations.

    They may ask you the typical interview questions - e.g why you want to do the foundation year and why they should choose you

    The most important thing in the interview is how you respond to the problem and stimulus they give you. The interview is like a mini-tutorial and they want to see how you respond to that kind of teaching. The most important thing is verbalising your thought processes - try to go into as much detail as possible and even say the obvious stuff. They want to see how you think under pressure. Other than that, you can't really prepare for this bit - perhaps you could go over notes on key theories etc.

    Overall try to be open-minded and engage with the material they give you as much as you can.

    Also I'd make sure you know your PS backwards - they may ask you to expand on anything you've said such as reading etc. That was one mistake I made in my interview - they asked about something I did at UNIQ but I'd completely forgotten about it so it was a bit uncomfortable!

    I really hope you're interview goes well! Best of luck!
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    (Original post by jodieworrall27)
    Hello!
    I have been extremely lucky enough to be shortlisted for an interview this year! The course I want to do is French. I am very excited and proud but also nervous ! My question for you is, how much emphasis in the interview is put on the questions such as , why do you want to do this subject, what do you know about it, what have you read around this subject etc.
    Also, I am a little lost with my two page response to a piece of French literature or a film - should this response be analysis with references or opinions and summaries of key points or themes? Or is the idea to see what our interpretation of a written response would be? It's all very intriguing and exciting !
    Hi!

    Firstly congratulations for getting an interview - it is a great achievement in itself because this year it is very competitive!

    The first two questions you mentioned - 'why the subject' and 'what do you know' - aren't that important. If you did terrible on these questions but amazingly with the material they gave you, of course it wouldn't matter. But It's good to have a partly prepared answer for these kind of questions - but if you find this question difficult, be honest with them - say 'I find that a difficult question' and instead you could describe a specific experience that affirmed your love for the subject.

    Also they don't expect you to know everything about your subject! They want someone who can think and engage with their subject especially when given new information - they want the person to be teachable

    For the third question you mentioned on 'reading', yes I think they'll be more emphasis on reading - this shows an interest and inquiring mind for the subject. However, this may be just one thing they balance up.

    I'm not so sure about this french film/literature response - but they won't go through with a tick box looking for certain things. They're likely to look for interesting, insightful and unique points you want to make - the more of what you think the better!

    The best of luck for your interview! I really hope it goes well for you!
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    (Original post by howardbakerd123)
    Hi!

    Firstly congratulations for getting an interview - it is a great achievement in itself because this year it is very competitive!

    The first two questions you mentioned - 'why the subject' and 'what do you know' - aren't that important. If you did terrible on these questions but amazingly with the material they gave you, of course it wouldn't matter. But It's good to have a partly prepared answer for these kind of questions - but if you find this question difficult, be honest with them - say 'I find that a difficult question' and instead you could describe a specific experience that affirmed your love for the subject.

    Also they don't expect you to know everything about your subject! They want someone who can think and engage with their subject especially when given new information - they want the person to be teachable

    For the third question you mentioned on 'reading', yes I think they'll be more emphasis on reading - this shows an interest and inquiring mind for the subject. However, this may be just one thing they balance up.

    I'm not so sure about this french film/literature response - but they won't go through with a tick box looking for certain things. They're likely to look for interesting, insightful and unique points you want to make - the more of what you think the better!

    The best of luck for your interview! I really hope it goes well for you!
    Thanks a lot this has been really helpful advice! I am really looking forward to it actually and feel quite prepared, fingers crossed ! ☺️
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    Hi, I am really pleased that you have given such a brilliant opportunity and that you are enjoying your course. I, too, would be interested in applying to study music on the foundation year. I have a couple of questions: can you apply both for the foundation year and for an undergraduate degree at the university simultaneously (having the foundation year as a back up plan?). My second question regards eligibility; I will briefly explain my circumstances. I am fortunate enough to live in a good area and attended a good private school, however I was unable to finish my education due to severe mental and physical disability (neuropsychiatric lupus). This left me unable to attend school so I have studied for my A level music (I am taking the exam this summer) from home with very little help. I am expecting to complete my other two A levels in the same manner whilst awaiting effective treatment (I am currently on immunosuppression for my condition). I do not fit the specific criteria however my studies have been greatly impacted by these extenuating circumstances which are obviously out of my control and equally damaging to difficult financial circumstances. So I suppose my questions to you are do you know anyone studying on the foundation year with similar circumstances to these, or anyone who has been granted a place based on difficulties of any other non-financial nature? I will not be offended if I am not considered eligible and am very pleased to hear such a programme exists. Thank you so much for your time.
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    (Original post by cathdxn19)
    I, too, would be interested in applying to study music on the foundation year. I have a couple of questions: can you apply both for the foundation year and for an undergraduate degree at the university simultaneously (having the foundation year as a back up plan?). My second question regards eligibility; I will briefly explain my circumstances. I am fortunate enough to live in a good area and attended a good private school, however I was unable to finish my education due to severe mental and physical disability (neuropsychiatric lupus). This left me unable to attend school so I have studied for my A level music (I am taking the exam this summer) from home with very little help. I am expecting to complete my other two A levels in the same manner whilst awaiting effective treatment (I am currently on immunosuppression for my condition). I do not fit the specific criteria however my studies have been greatly impacted by these extenuating circumstances which are obviously out of my control and equally damaging to difficult financial circumstances. So I suppose my questions to you are do you know anyone studying on the foundation year with similar circumstances to these, or anyone who has been granted a place based on difficulties of any other non-financial nature? I will not be offended if I am not considered eligible and am very pleased to hear such a programme exists. Thank you so much for your time.
    I hope you don't mind me copying LMH OXFORD into your post. (As someone who has developed lupus late in life, I'm rooting for you here!)
 
 
 
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