Who You Calling N****r Watch

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azim
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#101
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#101
(Original post by Jools)
So I think we've identified where the problem lies; not so much a lack of opportunities - as has been highlighted peers with the same (lack of) opportunities are generally more successful - but a lack of motivational figures. There's a gross under-representation of black academics, lawyers, politicians, accountants, doctors etc, whilst they are over-represented in football, athletics, the music industry, television/media etc - industries where achieving high grades is not usually necessary as there's an alternative route to success. Perhaps there should be a comprehensive project for successful black "professionals" to visit schools, to show that education can be the key to success.
You can't attribute one reason for a problem this big. Bottom line is blacks are discriminated against, blacks are poorer than whites, blacks are denied of most normal oppurtunities. Unless you are from the exact same situation as these people then you can't judge them for being lazy or having a lack of role models etc...

I'm not black btw, I'm asian.
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Biggles
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#102
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#102
(Original post by kay0)
Ok, you don't understand. Let me help you.

When my parents first came to this country (late 70's) they had NOTHING. They were both educated, but they were finding it very hard to find jobs. I wonder why. This led my dad to become self-employed. As you probably all know, you can't start a business from nothing, so he had to look for a bank loan. As a 1st generation immigrant he had no family to lend him money. The most the bank would lend him was £50. My mum and dad eventually found work as a factory worker and security guard respectively. They each worked 16 hours a day. During this time, my dad experienced want many young black males at the time experienced (falsely accused of robbery, verbal/physical abuse on the street etc). After a while, they had enough money to start their business. They also had a kid on the way (no family to babysit kids for free). For a few years they struggled with looking after kids and running their business with literally no support. No government handouts etc.

The end result was 4 privately educated children, 2 of them Bristol graduates, 1 Kings graduate (hopefully) and a walking corpse for a father ( to use my doctors words).

To be successful and black in this country is hard, especially if you are 1st generation. You have to sacrifice your health for it in some cases. Is it worth it?

You cannot compare the life of a black and white with equal ability in this country.
Its hard. So what?

If you decide to come to this country and want to be part of it you should work hard. If you will the end you must will the means. You cannot just come to this country (like immigrants are now doing thanks to Blair and co) and expect things to be easy. Hard work - that is the price you must pay to be here, to uproot and place yourself on new soil.

And you're not the only chaps who have to work hard - my dad had a heartattack last year. If one wants a decent lifestyle in this country has to work hard.
material breach
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#103
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#103
blacks that do suceed shouldnt critise those that havent achieved what they have - as discussed background and the culture make this hard, instead they should try to provide the role models that are needed and try to minimalise the gansta culture that seems to hold the status quo in many teenagers lives
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Brown Patrick Bateman
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#104
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#104
(Original post by kay0)
You cannot compare the life of a black and white with equal ability in this country.
What about black and Asian though? Both came to the UK around the same time, and plenty of Asians, like your parents, came with nothing. Some had no formal qualifications. Yet overall they have been more successful. Why?
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Brown Patrick Bateman
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#105
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#105
(Original post by azim)
You can't attribute one reason for a problem this big. Bottom line is blacks are discriminated against, blacks are poorer than whites, blacks are denied of most normal oppurtunities. Unless you are from the exact same situation as these people then you can't judge them for being lazy or having a lack of role models etc...

I'm not black btw, I'm asian.
Yeah I didn't say there was one reason, I was attributing what I believed was one of the fundamental reasons, along with several other mitigating factors.
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Biggles
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#106
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#106
(Original post by Jools)
So I think we've identified where the problem lies; not so much a lack of opportunities - as has been highlighted peers with the same (lack of) opportunities are generally more successful - but a lack of motivational figures. There's a gross under-representation of black academics, lawyers, politicians, accountants, doctors etc, whilst they are over-represented in football, athletics, the music industry, television/media etc - industries where achieving high grades is not usually necessary as there's an alternative route to success. Perhaps there should be a comprehensive project for successful black "professionals" to visit schools, to show that education can be the key to success.
Exactly - blacks do well in areas they're expected to be in - ie music and sport. But, alas, one cant have a million pop stars and football players. And since many of them are expected to be criminals they...become it. As a man thinketh so he is...
Brown Patrick Bateman
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#107
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#107
(Original post by azim)
I heard someone say that you see lots of Pakistani/Asian's saying they go about ruling the place, and a few agreed. When I point out that these people are a minority, Jools tell's me that the show was meant to highlight the minority, but it seems a lot of people think this is the view of a majority. The show should have shown the otherside of the coin, just to be fair.
A documentary which is eye-opening, provocative and causes a 100+ post thread would show Pakistanis saying that in a few decades they'll rule Britain and West Indians calling Somalis vermin.

A documentary which nobody watches would have Pakistanis saying how much they respect all races and West Indians saying all black people are their brothers.

Yes the downside of this is that some would be thinking that the minorities epitomise the typical Pakistani/Somali etc, but this is what happens on a daily basis in the paper - media influence shapes one's perception.
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mobbdeeprob
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#108
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#108
(Original post by kay0)
Ok, you don't understand. Let me help you.

When my parents first came to this country (late 70's) they had NOTHING.
As did mine.

(Original post by kay0)
They were both educated, but they were finding it very hard to find jobs. I wonder why. This led my dad to become self-employed. As you probably all know, you can't start a business from nothing, so he had to look for a bank loan. As a 1st generation immigrant he had no family to lend him money. The most the bank would lend him was £50. My mum and dad eventually found work as a factory worker and security guard respectively. They each worked 16 hours a day. During this time, my dad experienced want many young black males at the time experienced (falsely accused of robbery, verbal/physical abuse on the street etc). After a while, they had enough money to start their business. They also had a kid on the way (no family to babysit kids for free). For a few years they struggled with looking after kids and running their business with literally no support. No government handouts etc.
This sounds remarkably similar to the experiences of my parents. My dad had to shovel frozen peas into bags for 90 hours a week to fund his university costs. My mom had to do similarly crap jobs. Nobody in previous generations had been to university - my grandparents were dirt poor - and yet my dad went to Bristol, and mum to Warwick. Both became lecturers.

When they bought the house we live in, and when I was a baby in the womb - my dad looked out into the back garden to see about 30 uniformed Police Officers (who had broken in through the side gate). My dad approached them and was told to drop to the floor and put his hands on his head. It was only when one of the Senior Officers noticed my dad from the cricket club and said "No, this one's okay Guv" that things relented. And what had my parents done? Nothing - neither of them has ever been implicated in criminal activity ever.
The end result was 4 privately educated children, 2 of them Bristol graduates, 1 Kings graduate (hopefully) and a walking corpse for a father ( to use my doctors words).
Education is the key. It can cause massive improvements in standards of living over the course of a generation.

To be successful and black in this country is hard, especially if you are 1st generation. You have to sacrifice your health for it in some cases. Is it worth it?
Totally agreed.
You cannot compare the life of a black and white with equal ability in this country.
Indeed. It is a struggle - I have it easier than my parents did, but it will still be hard.
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kay0
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#109
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#109
(Original post by Jools)
What about black and Asian though? Both came to the UK around the same time, and plenty of Asians, like your parents, came with nothing. Some had no formal qualifications. Yet overall they have been more successful. Why?
Let me tell you what one of my dads white clients said 2 months ago.

"....too busy looking left discriminating against blacks, while on the right the asians were progressing. We've turned our heads right now......"

If this country was just whites and asians (no blacks), do you think that the asains would be where they are today in UK society?
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Biggles
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#110
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#110
(Original post by kay0)
Let me tell you what one of my dads white clients said 2 months ago.

"....too busy looking left discriminating against blacks, while on the right the asians were progressing. We've turned our heads right now......"

If this country was just whites and asians (no blacks), do you think that the asains would be where they are today in UK society?
oh my god. Conspiracy theory alert....
kay0
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#111
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#111
yeah mob, most of the rich Africans i know tell a similar story..........
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azim
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#112
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#112
I was just wondering where the people on this forum where brought up. I'm 16 years old and from Cardiff in South Wales. I've seen first hand some of the racism that goes on and the problems blacks (and other minorities) have to face on a day to day basis.

This is my website
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kay0
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#113
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#113
(Original post by Biggles)
oh my god. Conspiracy theory alert....
lol
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LH
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#114
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#114
(Original post by kay0)
Ok, you don't understand. Let me help you.

When my parents first came to this country (late 70's) they had NOTHING. They were both educated, but they were finding it very hard to find jobs. I wonder why. This led my dad to become self-employed. As you probably all know, you can't start a business from nothing, so he had to look for a bank loan. As a 1st generation immigrant he had no family to lend him money. The most the bank would lend him was £50. My mum and dad eventually found work as a factory worker and security guard respectively. They each worked 16 hours a day. During this time, my dad experienced want many young black males at the time experienced (falsely accused of robbery, verbal/physical abuse on the street etc). After a while, they had enough money to start their business. They also had a kid on the way (no family to babysit kids for free). For a few years they struggled with looking after kids and running their business with literally no support. No government handouts etc.

The end result was 4 privately educated children, 2 of them Bristol graduates, 1 Kings graduate (hopefully) and a walking corpse for a father ( to use my doctors words).

To be successful and black in this country is hard, especially if you are 1st generation. You have to sacrifice your health for it in some cases. Is it worth it?

You cannot compare the life of a black and white with equal ability in this country.
This describes my parents' life to some extent, except they're not black. This sort of life is still common place where I live, or at least was when my parents were born. But if you're born with nothing you have to work your arse off to achieve something

And of the hundred or so boys who attended my Dad's pisspoor school most have done very well for themselves.

Being born with nothing is not an excuse.
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mobbdeeprob
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#115
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#115
(Original post by kay0)
yeah mob, most of the rich Africans i know tell a similar story..........
Are you African or Afro-Caribbean?
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Brown Patrick Bateman
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#116
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#116
(Original post by kay0)
Let me tell you what one of my dads white clients said 2 months ago.

"....too busy looking left discriminating against blacks, while on the right the asians were progressing. We've turned our heads right now......"

If this country was just whites and asians (no blacks), do you think that the asains would be where they are today in UK society?
But why has this happened? Asians and blacks came here with relatively similar backgrounds - little money, few qualifications etc. So why 40 years on are blacks discriminated against and Asians progressing?
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kay0
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#117
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#117
(Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
This describes my parents' life to some extent, except they're not black. This sort of life is still common place where I live, or at least was when my parents were born. But if you're born with nothing you have to work your arse off to achieve something

And of the hundred or so boys who attended my Dad's pisspoor school most have done very well for themselves.

Being born with nothing is not an excuse.
Being born with nothing is no excuse, but add daily racial discrimination to that and it's a completely different story.
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mobbdeeprob
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#118
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#118
(Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
This describes my parents' life to some extent, except they're not black. This sort of life is still common place where I live, or at least was when my parents were born. But if you're born with nothing you have to work your arse off to achieve something

And of the hundred or so boys who attended my Dad's pisspoor school most have done very well for themselves.

Being born with nothing is not an excuse.
Agreed. It can be an incentive and a bloody good lesson in life to people.

My Dad refuses to own any credit cards - credit wasn't a part of his upbringing, why should it be now?

Of the people who went to his school in Barbados - one became, perhaps, one of the most amazing W.I Test cricketers of all time, then there are doctors, lawyers, accountants, airline pilots etc.

And I've been to the house that my dad was brought up in, and quite frankly it's a third world shack.

This didn't stop people from being proud and ambitious though.
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kay0
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#119
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#119
(Original post by Jools)
But why has this happened? Asians and blacks came here with relatively similar backgrounds - little money, few qualifications etc. So why 40 years on are blacks discriminated against and Asians progressing?
You didn't answer my question.
Mob take an educated guess!
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Brown Patrick Bateman
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#120
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#120
(Original post by kay0)
You didn't answer my question.
I'd say no but it's too hypothetical.
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