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Seeing a GP about anxiety, what does it entail? Watch

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    Hello,

    I've been having to miss a lot of university lectures to the point where I've been struggling academically. I've been told that I can apply for assistance, but I would need to visit a GP.

    My question is, what does this involve? I've been told that I need some sort of letter from the GP to give to the university, but how do I get/ask for that? Is it a case of explaining things to the GP and they will write a note or something and that's it, or will I have to be referred to someone else?

    Will I just be prescribed some tablets or something on the day or will I need to go to counselling or anything like that?
    The reason I ask the above is that I don't want to adopt a sort of 'label'; I spoke to a university counsellor who said that my visiting a GP could mean that I can get help with my university struggles but I don't have to take it any further if don't want to.

    Also, I was given a DSA form for if/when I go to the GP. What do I do with this?!

    Any help is greatly appreciated.
    • #1
    #1

    Following thread as i'm too interested in replies.

    OP can I ask - what did your first visit to Uni counselling entail?

    I'm currently on placement - headed back to Uni for third year this Autumn, very much considering giving it a go.

    Cheers
    • #2
    #2

    (Original post by Wiggly)
    Hello,

    I've been having to miss a lot of university lectures to the point where I've been struggling academically. I've been told that I can apply for assistance, but I would need to visit a GP.

    My question is, what does this involve? I've been told that I need some sort of letter from the GP to give to the university, but how do I get/ask for that? Is it a case of explaining things to the GP and they will write a note or something and that's it, or will I have to be referred to someone else?

    Will I just be prescribed some tablets or something on the day or will I need to go to counselling or anything like that?
    The reason I ask the above is that I don't want to adopt a sort of 'label'; I spoke to a university counsellor who said that my visiting a GP could mean that I can get help with my university struggles but I don't have to take it any further if don't want to.

    Also, I was given a DSA form for if/when I go to the GP. What do I do with this?!

    Any help is greatly appreciated.
    I had low mood/anxiety at medical school. When it became worse, it adversely affected my exam performance, and I went to my GP.

    In my case, I just kind of explained my symptoms, and he said sounds like low mood and anxiety. He said counselling would be first thing to try, and that another option would be anti-depressants.

    I completely understand not wanting to have a label. I have a similar perspective, and I was never actually "diagnosed" with anything, even though I know that I presumably satisfy the diagnostic criteria for depression (but not anxiety).

    The GP would be able to write you a letter.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    OP can I ask - what did your first visit to Uni counselling entail?
    It was quite good; it was like talking to any 'normal' person to be fair. I told them what the problem is and we talked about it - e.g. when/where the problem occurs at university and to what extent it occurs outside of university too. They also asked questions about everyday life, e.g. if I had many friends, hear voices inside my head, thought about suicide, etc. It was all quite subtle though.

    They briefly discussed options, but emphasised that I would need to see a GP before anything could actually be done, and that we can discuss the options better after this has happened.

    And they also gave me the Disability Allowance form, 'for later one'. I have no idea when that comes into use though.

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I had low mood/anxiety at medical school. When it became worse, it adversely affected my exam performance, and I went to my GP.

    In my case, I just kind of explained my symptoms, and he said sounds like low mood and anxiety. He said counselling would be first thing to try, and that another option would be anti-depressants.

    I completely understand not wanting to have a label. I have a similar perspective, and I was never actually "diagnosed" with anything, even though I know that I presumably satisfy the diagnostic criteria for depression (but not anxiety).

    The GP would be able to write you a letter.
    Much appreciated. Did you have to get referred for counselling on the day or is it something that you could choose if/when to pursue?
    • #3
    #3

    Hi, as someone with experience in a GP surgery and who deals with patients in primary care with anxiety / depressive conditiions, it starts out with the gp asking you a few questions (either in the form of a questionnaire or general open questions relating yourself, how your daily life has been affected, have you tried anything).

    in terms of treatment options, therapy should be the primary option in people who are non-suicidal/at risk of great harm but the sad reality is that a lot of GPs will prescribe antidepressants (antidepressants are surprisingly the 1st line of treatment for anxiety disorders) as for whatever reasons (poor local mental health facilities, being unwilling to refer patients due to laziness/ whatever).

    If you get therapy recommendation, go for it, but be aware there may be a waiting list
 
 
 
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