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Any advice for my depersonalisation and derealisation? Watch

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    Almost four years ago, I left my childhood home and my entire family moved to England. Since then, I have had DPD(look it up if you haven't heard of it), don't feel like anything exists or is real, feel like I'm watching myself through a screen and it's so horrible! I've never met anyone who knows what it is, and only a handful of people online. Has anyone else suffered with this????? I can't stay like this forever and it's been so many years and I can't take it. I'm not suicidal, but sometimes it feels like nothing around me is real, so why not end it all? I just need to stop this depersonalisation does anyone know how??
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    I've suffered with this as part of my dissociative identity. Grounding techniques sometimes help but I'm not sure there is a quick way to deal with it. Something is causing you to dissociate so until that is resolved/figured out it can sometimes be really hard to manage the symptoms.

    I've had a number of different symptoms and my depersonalisation can get pretty bad. I have watched myself become invisible - in therapy we linked that to feeling invisible in my past and therapist tells me (a lot) that I'm a real person and not invisible.

    It's reduced how often I get it but still there sometimes.
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    (Original post by ~Tara~)
    I've suffered with this as part of my dissociative identity. Grounding techniques sometimes help but I'm not sure there is a quick way to deal with it. Something is causing you to dissociate so until that is resolved/figured out it can sometimes be really hard to manage the symptoms.

    I've had a number of different symptoms and my depersonalisation can get pretty bad. I have watched myself become invisible - in therapy we linked that to feeling invisible in my past and therapist tells me (a lot) that I'm a real person and not invisible.

    It's reduced how often I get it but still there sometimes.
    Thank you for telling me. I really want it to go away because I always feel like this and sometimes can't take it.
    The issue was all my grief from leaving, and then I hid it by reading and escaping reality a lot, and now I can't feel anything. It also feels like no time has passed so I don't recognize myself in the mirror because I'm taller and all. What I've tried is really focusing on my surroundings and not burying any grief I feel. But it's hard because four years is a loong time!
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    I don't have any good advice as such unfortunately - do you have any professional help for this? If not I recommend you speak to your GP or *insert any professional who can deal with it/refer you to appropriate person*

    I get brief periods of depersonalisation particularly when I'm not handling my emotions well at all or in therapy and it is very scary at times. I cannot imagine how scary it must feel for you to be in that state constantly, for so long!!
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I don't have any good advice as such unfortunately - do you have any professional help for this? If not I recommend you speak to your GP or *insert any professional who can deal with it/refer you to appropriate person*

    I get brief periods of depersonalisation particularly when I'm not handling my emotions well at all or in therapy and it is very scary at times. I cannot imagine how scary it must feel for you to be in that state constantly, for so long!!
    Thank you for understanding It's pretty awful so I'm sorry you have it too. It really is a case of dealing with emotions badly with me, which makes it so frustrating because it feels like my fault :/
    I did go talk to a counseller once, but it's a pretty rare thing, so she didn't know much about it. And that was so painful and draining that I don't know if I can manage it again, since it didn't really help that much (although she had some good advice on grounding techniques)
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    (Original post by DeepInTheMeadow)
    Thank you for understanding It's pretty awful so I'm sorry you have it too. It really is a case of dealing with emotions badly with me, which makes it so frustrating because it feels like my fault :/
    I did go talk to a counseller once, but it's a pretty rare thing, so she didn't know much about it. And that was so painful and draining that I don't know if I can manage it again, since it didn't really help that much (although she had some good advice on grounding techniques)
    Hmm yes, therapy/counselling are painful but no pain, no gain - is what I tell myself when I get unsure whether I'm doing the right thing, because frankly, starting therapy was like opening a can of worms (ignorance is a bliss sometimes!!)
    But yeah, I think it's difficult but very important to find the right person to work with. I've worked with three therapists and second one handled it very badly that it got worse, whereas with my current therapist who's very experienced I manage to stay somewhat grounded most of the time. I hope you find the right help soon!!
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    I don't suffer from DPD but due to conditions I do suffer from DP/DR has been a big part of my life for years and they are two of the most distressing symptoms I think you can ever face. At my worst, I felt so detached from both myself and surroundings that I didn't recognise myself or loved ones and I felt physically numb. I couldn't go outside because everything looked alien and dangerous. I couldn't feel any touch from myself or others and that led to recklessness which is why its essential to nip DP/DR in the bud. I noticed that the only thing I could ever feel through the DP/DR was anxiety. No matter how much I felt, I could always feel that and still had horrendous panics.

    I've been in and out of therapy all my life for a few conditions and tbh, when I brought up DP/DR, no one really bothered about it or explained it to me which was surprising because to me, it was such a huge part of my life and such a consuming symptom so I had to do my own research. DP/DR, as horrible as it feels is nothing more than a 'mind burnout'. Your mind is exhausted from constant anxiety, stress, hardships so it shuts itself down almost, to try and protect itself from further damage and give you a chance to heal. It feels like the polar opposite when it scares the hell out of you though! I found researching it and talking to others in the same boat really helped me. Losing the fear of it, is the best thing. Once you can accept that it is a by product of anxiety/stress/other MH conditions, that helps you relax a little and gives you a chance to heal but I'll admit, it takes a while to get to that mindset. I found reading Dr Claire Weekes books and audiotapes were very good and helped me so much. They are mainly based on panic attacks but do touch on DP/DR as well as things like depression too and I recommend them whole heartedly :yep:
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    (Original post by Spock's Socks)
    I don't suffer from DPD but due to conditions I do suffer from DP/DR has been a big part of my life for years and they are two of the most distressing symptoms I think you can ever face. At my worst, I felt so detached from both myself and surroundings that I didn't recognise myself or loved ones and I felt physically numb. I couldn't go outside because everything looked alien and dangerous. I couldn't feel any touch from myself or others and that led to recklessness which is why its essential to nip DP/DR in the bud. I noticed that the only thing I could ever feel through the DP/DR was anxiety. No matter how much I felt, I could always feel that and still had horrendous panics.

    I've been in and out of therapy all my life for a few conditions and tbh, when I brought up DP/DR, no one really bothered about it or explained it to me which was surprising because to me, it was such a huge part of my life and such a consuming symptom so I had to do my own research. DP/DR, as horrible as it feels is nothing more than a 'mind burnout'. Your mind is exhausted from constant anxiety, stress, hardships so it shuts itself down almost, to try and protect itself from further damage and give you a chance to heal. It feels like the polar opposite when it scares the hell out of you though! I found researching it and talking to others in the same boat really helped me. Losing the fear of it, is the best thing. Once you can accept that it is a by product of anxiety/stress/other MH conditions, that helps you relax a little and gives you a chance to heal but I'll admit, it takes a while to get to that mindset. I found reading Dr Claire Weekes books and audiotapes were very good and helped me so much. They are mainly based on panic attacks but do touch on DP/DR as well as things like depression too and I recommend them whole heartedly :yep:
    Thank you so much! I thought I read somewhere that DPD was a defence mechanism but wasn't sure so it scared me. You have really helped me. I'll try not to be so scared anymore.

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Hmm yes, therapy/counselling are painful but no pain, no gain - is what I tell myself when I get unsure whether I'm doing the right thing, because frankly, starting therapy was like opening a can of worms (ignorance is a bliss sometimes!!)
    But yeah, I think it's difficult but very important to find the right person to work with. I've worked with three therapists and second one handled it very badly that it got worse, whereas with my current therapist who's very experienced I manage to stay somewhat grounded most of the time. I hope you find the right help soon!!
    Thank you very much for understanding (again) because I don't want to end up with someone who makes it worse, I think it would tip me over the edge.
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    I suffer from Depersonalisation too! It really sucks and it's so frustrating because I'd like to just be able to enjoy things and take them in when they're happening but most days I just get in bed at night and it doesn't even feel like the day happened...

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    Do feel like it's massively underrepresented compared to other mental illnesses. I didn't even know it existed until Dodie Clark made a video on it (I'm not self diagnosed btw I've been to a doctor and I'm being referred to a therapist)

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    (Original post by MissLucyM)
    I suffer from Depersonalisation too! It really sucks and it's so frustrating because I'd like to just be able to enjoy things and take them in when they're happening but most days I just get in bed at night and it doesn't even feel like the day happened...

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    Definitely relate to that! It really sucks :/ And also yes, massively underrepresented, I spent several years just thinking I was going completely crazy and the only thing that helped is that my mum occasionally experienced something similar so she could tell me not to worry.
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    (Original post by DeepInTheMeadow)
    Almost four years ago, I left my childhood home and my entire family moved to England. Since then, I have had DPD(look it up if you haven't heard of it), don't feel like anything exists or is real, feel like I'm watching myself through a screen and it's so horrible! I've never met anyone who knows what it is, and only a handful of people online. Has anyone else suffered with this????? I can't stay like this forever and it's been so many years and I can't take it. I'm not suicidal, but sometimes it feels like nothing around me is real, so why not end it all? I just need to stop this depersonalisation does anyone know how??
    Why don't you try joining a social group such as a performing arts group or a sports group?
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    (Original post by Recognition)
    Why don't you try joining a social group such as a performing arts group or a sports group?
    Hey there! I have joined two sport groups- boxing and football, however I am fearfully shy in football. I adore boxing though and it's really fun, but so far it hasn't particularly helped with my depersonalisation.
 
 
 
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