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    So im thinking of degrees now and i am particularly interested in going into something like investment banking, hedge funds, PE something good like that.
    But I know that the industry is changing rapidly and I want to know which degree would be the best in terms for some job security and ability to stand the test of time.

    Im thinking of a maths degree, would this open up all options? Im also looking at maths + econ which seems interesting.

    Im also looking at something like high freq trading and algo trading so which degree would be best

    So what kind of grads will be in demand when the industry changes as a result of technology?
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    (Original post by ;69860432)
    So im thinking of degrees now and i am particularly interested in going into something like investment banking, hedge funds, PE something good like that.
    But I know that the industry is changing rapidly and I want to know which degree would be the best in terms for some job security and ability to stand the test of time.

    Im thinking of a maths degree, would this open up all options? Im also looking at maths + econ which seems interesting.

    Im also looking at something like high freq trading and algo trading so which degree would be best

    So what kind of grads will be in demand when the industry changes as a result of technology?
    CompSci

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    CompSci

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    Yeah I was thinking of that but wouldnt a maths degree give you all you need????????

    And what about maths+economics or pure econ, opinions on that?????!!!????!!!????!?!?!?!?
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    (Original post by ;69860468)
    Yeah I was thinking of that but wouldnt a maths degree give you all you need????????

    And what about maths+economics or pure econ, opinions on that?????!!!????!!!????!?!?!?!?
    lol, i was just being biased. the degree you enjoy the most is the answer and has always been the answer.

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    Psychology at loughborough
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    Learn to code.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    lol, i was just being biased. the degree you enjoy the most is the answer and has always been the answer.

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    True but im trying to weigh in future prospects in with my decision. No point doing something you love and then end up with no job/ finding out your degree is outdated
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    (Original post by gsbs2)
    Psychology at loughborough
    (Original post by yudothis)
    Learn to code.
    Pls help me
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    cant go wrong with some golf management studies
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    I wouldn't go with something computer-related. Sure it would be useful at the lower levels, but once you make it to the top its all communication and industry knowledge
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    (Original post by Gladstone1885)
    I wouldn't go with something computer-related. Sure it would be useful at the lower levels, but once you make it to the top its all communication and industry knowledge
    are you implying that people who do cs can't communicate because they do cs?

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    (Original post by gr8wizard10)
    cant go wrong with some golf management studies
    pls bro help a man out
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    (Original post by Gladstone1885)
    I wouldn't go with something computer-related. Sure it would be useful at the lower levels, but once you make it to the top its all communication and industry knowledge
    Oh okay
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    STEM subjects preferably..
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    (Original post by <<voldie>>)
    So im thinking of degrees now and i am particularly interested in going into something like investment banking, hedge funds, PE something good like that...Im also looking at something like high freq trading and algo trading so which degree would be best
    it doesn't seem that you yet have a particular interest, except perhaps in being high-earning.

    When people on here talk about "IB" they are almost always referring to the front office revenue generating roles that are chiefly client management. You might go to LinkedIn and have a look at the backgrounds of the people now doing the kind of job that you would want one day to do: they have degrees in all sorts and the chief point of commonality is that they typically got their degrees (in History or Theology or whatever it was) from fancypants schools. You don't need monte carlo simulations to take a Frenchman to Wimbledon.

    If you wanted to be a backroom boy, few enough of this lot do, or to work in trading, then a quantitative degree is going to be the thing. So that is your best bet for only "working in financial services" and as well your best hedge against the possibility of not being able to work in financial services, this for its conferring a skill set that is valued more widely than in only that industry.
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    (Original post by Gladstone1885)
    I wouldn't go with something computer-related. Sure it would be useful at the lower levels, but once you make it to the top its all communication and industry knowledge
    In terms of industry knowledge, that would mean going for a finance related degree in this case. AFAIK, most of the industry knowledge that you might gain from any such degree will be easily picked up during the job training, hence the roles not requiring or even preferring a specific degree. If anything, something computer related, specifically comp. sci., would give you industry skills that are not easily obtainable, albeit slightly specific within this industry (though one will still gain many broad skills, plus it's as future proof as you're going to get).

    (Original post by <<voldie>>)
    Yeah I was thinking of that but wouldnt a maths degree give you all you need????????

    And what about maths+economics or pure econ, opinions on that?????!!!????!!!????!?!?!?!?
    Maths is quite broad, and although it's very difficult to avoid computer elements in maths these days (believe me I know), the amount of computer elements varies with the course and the modules you choose. So if that is an area you are interested in, then have a look at course prospectus for that, and you could also consider Maths and Comp. Sci. joint honours. Though that is now two subjects you've yet to be convinced about, make sure you're absolutely interested in most of the elements of any course you choose. If you research and think about it enough while you are studying or whatever, you will more or less work it out.
    Beware, maths at degree level is different to maths at A-level, which many people struggle with and drop out. So it's not only if you are good at it, as that is difficult to gauge (but possible). Interest in the course really helps.

    (Original post by <<voldie>>)
    True but im trying to weigh in future prospects in with my decision. No point doing something you love and then end up with no job/ finding out your degree is outdated
    The point is that, in general, employers don't care. Unless you want to be an engineer, medic or techie then it's best to do something you are interested in/good at, as that will enhance your chances of getting a good grade at a university with a deeper course, which are things that will set you apart in this industry.
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    (Original post by <<voldie>>)
    pls bro help a man out

    get into a target uni - it makes life a lot easier, and is what matters the most

    study whatever you like or enjoy as long as you are in a target, and do your independent reading and learning to prepare well for interviews and internships
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    Best courses are: accounting/finance, compsci, information systems management (this one good particularly), maths/stats/etc.


    Anything else is pretty much a meme
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    (Original post by yudothis)
    Learn to code.
    But what about when the computers learn to code for us?!

    (Original post by Princepieman)
    are you implying that people who do cs can't communicate because they do cs?
    Would it be fair to say it's not a degree that focuses on building that skill set?

    I wouldn't assume someone can't draw because they study History. That doesn't mean the History degree is enabling them to develop their artistic ability.

    I'm being argumentative for the sake of it really
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    (Original post by M1011)
    But what about when the computers learn to code for us?!
    Then be the person that discovers how to make computers code for us.
 
 
 
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