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    After doing a degree, I was considering doing a higher level degree, either a Masters or a PhD. Do you have to do a Masters before you can progress onto a PhD or can you go and do a PhD straight away? :confused:
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    (Original post by thingirl)
    After doing a degree, I was considering doing a higher level degree, either a Masters or a PhD. Do you have to do a Masters before you can progress onto a PhD or can you go and do a PhD straight away? :confused:
    If they like your research you have done for your undergraduate degree you can do a PhD straight from an undergraduate degree however a lot of people seem to have masters before they do a PhD.
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    I have visited the webpages of seven universities in the UK (Imperial, Cambridge, Oxford, UCL, Warwick, Durham and Manchester).

    For all of these universities, the entry requirement for a Ph.D. in Physics is a four-year undergraduate Bachelor's degree with at least 2nd Upper class Honours.

    So I suppose that yes, it is possible to skip the Master's and go straight into the Ph.D.

    Hope this helps.
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    Is it possible to do a masters in a different subject (i.e. A BSc in Aviation Tech then a MSc in Physics)? Just wondering.
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    At Essex, you can do a Masters or pHD with a BA 1:1 or 2:1.
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    (Original post by thingirl)
    After doing a degree, I was considering doing a higher level degree, either a Masters or a PhD. Do you have to do a Masters before you can progress onto a PhD or can you go and do a PhD straight away? :confused:
    Some places specify you have to have a masters. On the whole, this is rare, and providing you have a 21 you can go straight from undergrad degree to PhD/D.Phil
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    (Original post by neutrino)
    I have visited the webpages of seven universities in the UK (Imperial, Cambridge, Oxford, UCL, Warwick, Durham and Manchester).

    For all of these universities, the entry requirement for a Ph.D. in Physics is a four-year undergraduate Bachelor's degree with at least 2nd Upper class Honours.

    So I suppose that yes, it is possible to skip the Master's and go straight into the Ph.D.

    Hope this helps.
    Surely the four year undergraduate degree is an MPhys? Then that's a bachelor's degree and a master's degree merged into one, so technically you will have done a master's degree before doing a PhD (if you decided to do a PhD)
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    (Original post by .NK)
    Surely the four year undergraduate degree is an MPhys? Then that's a bachelor's degree and a master's degree merged into one, so technically you will have done a master's degree before doing a PhD (if you decided to do a PhD)

    The places I know of that stipulate a masters first do not accept MChem/MPhys etc. They're all well and good if you want to move into industry, but do not translate well into an academic standard.
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    (Original post by thingirl)
    After doing a degree, I was considering doing a higher level degree, either a Masters or a PhD. Do you have to do a Masters before you can progress onto a PhD or can you go and do a PhD straight away? :confused:
    It depends on the course and university. For my subject, most universities that I know of ask for a Masters before you can progress to a PhD. That seems to be the same for all the arts, but for sciences I believe you can go from a BA to a PhD in most cases.
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    You tend to do a masters because you find/refine your research topic during this time.

    Also, as said above, reseach councils (i.e. ESRC who could give you studentship) often require you to do an integrated masters as part of research trainning, hence the 'New Route' PhD. Having a masters does look good on the application - shows that you have spent a year working your ass off and now have a clear(er) focus.

    If you want any advice PM me. I have a masters and considering whether or not to do another one as part of the PhD - the first 2 terms of a Phd are usually used as research trainning, however new route phds do all the research trainning in the academic year before, then throw in a dissertation in the summer term and call it an msc, which gives you a 3 year pure phd route rather than research trainning during phd, so all in all the new route phd takes 4 years, with msc, BUT you can submit early (i.e. before the 4 years is over - at least at exeter you can)

    Any help (im kinda rushed)
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    Ditto for the help - feel free to PM me.

    I did my D.Phil at Oxford - straight from BSc. I did a science doctorate (MRC). My t'other half did an AHRC doctorate (Law - Oxon) and got his place on the back of his LLB - no masters.
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    Thank you for all your help!
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    I had a general humanities (English and History) degree and did a masters to convert to a different field (Special Educational Needs). The research training MSc isnt compulsory for me, but I can do it and submit the phd early and come out with an extra MSc in the same amount of time - but I imagine Oxbridge students who have a very clear path anyway could go straight to a phd.

    what are you wanting to research and where at?
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    (Original post by thingirl)
    After doing a degree, I was considering doing a higher level degree, either a Masters or a PhD. Do you have to do a Masters before you can progress onto a PhD or can you go and do a PhD straight away? :confused:
    i guess you 'd better get a master degree before your phd work, trust me!!
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    How long do PhD's take to complete or is it variable?
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    (Original post by thingirl)
    How long do PhD's take to complete or is it variable?
    It vaired - my friend did his in 2 years - at the moment if you are funded you usually get funding for 3 years (although this is changing to 4 years for science as of 2006 - Roberts Report). I would say the norm in 3.5 years. If you take more than 4 years the university get black balled - they won't like that!
 
 
 
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