Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Studying medicine in Germany! Your thoughts? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    I am going to study an undergraduate degree of medicine in Germany in German and yes I have started learning German a month ago. I will need to complete at least German level B1 to be able to study there! I do in fact meet the requirements but I will have to do a foundation year (Studienkolleg) to be prepared better for the university and improve my German too. What are your thoughts on this? Do you think I should do it or not? Please state the pros and cons. Thanks in advance!
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I'm may be wrong here OP (I'm sure you've done your research!) but I always thought you needed your TestDaF to study at a German uni?
    Also, if you only started learning a month ago, what are your timescales? It takes a long time to become fluent in any language- I can't imagine how long it takes to be able to work in the language at university level!
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IGCSEStudent99)
    ... and yes I have started learning German a month ago.
    Holy **** - and you don't think that will be a problem? You're going to become entirely fluent in german, whilst having no native speakers to talk to, in, what, a year? Alongside other studies too?!

    Assuming you can somehow do that - advantages include being able to escape the NHS and all its rules, much shorter training times to be a consultant, and a less brutal workload (i believe). Disadvantages include an uncertainty over what will happen post-brexit regarding how easy it would be for you to come back, should you want to.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sherbet_lemons7)
    I'm may be wrong here OP (I'm sure you've done your research!) but I always thought you needed your TestDaF to study at a German uni?
    Also, if you only started learning a month ago, what are your timescales? It takes a long time to become fluent in any language- I can't imagine how long it takes to be able to work in the language at university level!
    Oh actually yeah I forgot to mention that I will have to do some tests first like you mentioned and no actually I might not become fluent in such a time. B1 isn't actually the level of fluency. I will be doing a preparatory year as well in which I will improve a lot in German.

    I am not studying online or such. I have a private fluent tutor. Actually, I got a shitload of work at the moment. 3/4 German classes per week is a lot. But I am trying my best.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IGCSEStudent99)
    Oh actually yeah I forgot to mention that I will have to do some tests first like you mentioned and no actually I might not become fluent in such a time. B1 isn't actually the level of fluency. I will be doing a preparatory year as well in which I will improve a lot in German.
    OP how long are you talking here? :confused: You can't get to that level from nothing in a year! Is it really only B1 for getting onto Studienkolleg? Do you mind sharing where you saw that?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    I don't want to sound unenthusiastic for you, but I think the language requirement is going to be the killer here. German isn't the easiest language to learn (to be fair, it's not the hardest, either), but you've essentially got to get to two levels of fluency - a general conversational, functional ability which will allow you to successfully be a student in Germany and a further, technical level of fluency to allow you to adequately study your degree. A degree which is hard in English, never mind a foreign language. And you propose to do all this in a year or so... This sounds entirely unrealistic to me. I, too, question the need for level B1 only - I would have thought at a minimum you'd need B2, or more realistically C1. You really can't expect to reach that level in a year or so - even with total immersion it would be a struggle.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    Here's the link: http://www.studienkollegs.de/The%20a...20process.html Only B1 is required. I know that it might be unrealistic is hard but I have already started and I liked the language I am doing well. Plus, I will spend another year in Germany studying German in the preparatory course!
    "

    German knowledge

    When you apply to study at a Studienkolleg you must already have a knowledge of German at least at the B1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Please ask the Studienkolleg where you wish to study about specific language requirements.


    "
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IGCSEStudent99)
    Here's the link: http://www.studienkollegs.de/The%20a...20process.html Only B1 is required. I know that it might be unrealistic is hard but I have already started and I liked the language I am doing well. Plus, I will spend another year in Germany studying German in the preparatory course!
    "

    German knowledge

    When you apply to study at a Studienkolleg you must already have a knowledge of German at least at the B1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Please ask the Studienkolleg where you wish to study about specific language requirements.


    "
    Hmm. :erm: To be honest OP, you can't judge how well learning a language is going to go from the first month. Have you learned any other languages in the past? And 3 or 4 lessons a week is probably about the minimum you'd be doing if this was a subject at school (I'm assuming you're still in high school) at standard grade level. Are you doing this alongside your other subjects? And if you want to get into medicine, I'm assuming you have a lot of voluntry work and extra curricular stuff?
    I'm not trying to be unkind here OP, I think it's a great dream to have and you should work towards it if that's what you want to do in life. But you need to be realistic. And I dont think this plan is.

    Who have you spoken this over with? Any guidance teacher or uni admissions people?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sherbet_lemons7)
    Hmm. :erm: To be honest OP, you can't judge how well learning a language is going to go from the first month. Have you learned any other languages in the past? And 3 or 4 lessons a week is probably about the minimum you'd be doing if this was a subject at school (I'm assuming you're still in high school) at standard grade level. Are you doing this alongside your other subjects? And if you want to get into medicine, I'm assuming you have a lot of voluntry work and extra curricular stuff?
    I'm not trying to be unkind here OP, I think it's a great dream to have and you should work towards it if that's what you want to do in life. But you need to be realistic. And I dont think this plan is.

    Who have you spoken this over with? Any guidance teacher or uni admissions people?
    Oh no don't worry it's okay you are not unkind But a private tuition is much better than a school as the teacher will be fully focused with you and will be able to do much more in a shorter time(Each is class is about 2 hours). I know that it's a dream and may or may not come true. I am yet to communicate with uni admissions. It's not the end of the world thats what I always say to myself. I will work hard and try to pursue my dream. If it doesn't turn out true it's not the end. Yes I will be disappointed. I am not worried about my grades fortunately, just the language.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IGCSEStudent99)
    Oh no don't worry it's okay you are not unkind But a private tuition is much better than a school as the teacher will be fully focused with you and will be able to do much more in a shorter time(Each is class is about 2 hours). I know that it's a dream and may or may not come true. I am yet to communicate with uni admissions. It's not the end of the world thats what I always say to myself. I will work hard and try to pursue my dream. If it doesn't turn out true it's not the end. Yes I will be disappointed. I am not worried about my grades fortunately, just the language.
    There were only about 5 in my school in the SG German class in my year, and 2 in the Higher class. I've never had any kind of private tuition but would argue that the small group was very benificial.

    Not saying it wont come true, just that I can't see how it's possible in a year. Speak it over with guidance and admissions, then maybe re-jig your plans.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    How would the med school admissions work? I've heard that in some countries (France I guess?) a lot of people get in to the foundation year but then like 10% of them are selected based on their grades and/or an entrance exam score to the med school itself and it's super competitive. If it works like this and the exams are in german you'd have a really high risk of not getting in and ending up wasting time and money in the foundation year - it's tough even when you're a native speaker and it would be incredibly difficult for you as you'd be competing against them.

    I live in Finland and when I considered applying here I thought I might apply to study in Swedish because it's easier to get in. I'm fluent in the language and had been learning it for 10 years or so but when I looked at the past entrance exams I found them impossible. Even if you're quite good at the everyday stuff it's a totally different ball game when you need to talk science.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by StationToStation)
    How would the med school admissions work? I've heard that in some countries (France I guess?) a lot of people get in to the foundation year but then like 10% of them are selected based on their grades and/or an entrance exam score to the med school itself and it's super competitive. If it works like this and the exams are in german you'd have a really high risk of not getting in and ending up wasting time and money in the foundation year - it's tough even when you're a native speaker and it would be incredibly difficult for you as you'd be competing against them.

    I live in Finland and when I considered applying here I thought I might apply to study in Swedish because it's easier to get in. I'm fluent in the language and had been learning it for 10 years or so but when I looked at the past entrance exams I found them impossible. Even if you're quite good at the everyday stuff it's a totally different ball game when you need to talk science.
    I don't know I am worried :s and confused. I got A*'s in all of my subjects, but studying in another language will definitely be tougher. But, I heard that most of the terms and processes in Biology for example will be the same since they are in Latin. It's risky, I agree.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IGCSEStudent99)
    I don't know I am worried :s and confused. I got A*'s in all of my subjects, but studying in another language will definitely be tougher. But, I heard that most of the terms and processes in Biology for example will be the same since they are in Latin. It's risky, I agree.
    Yeah I'm sure you'd do ok if you got in - but if there's an important entrance exam in German after the foundation year I think that the getting in part might be the bigger problem. Maybe try to figure out how the admissions works asap to get a clearer idea of what's required.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    B1 level is roughly AS/A2 and will probably require 300-400 hours of German study. If you're having private tuition 3 times a week then that works out roughly to 1 year which is doable. However these frameworks are not necessarily written for technical jargon subjects.

    So it's possible but it would demand extraordinary willpower and self-motivation on your part. You'll have to immerse yourself in it even in your off-time. The preparatory year will help of course but what you're really looking to aim for is fluency in the long run since you'll need C1 or C2 fairly quickly once you begin the actual medicine course. I think you might underestimate how difficult reading a research paper in German might be.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    I hope that someone who isn't German and have already studied/is studying in Germany to tell me more about his/her experience
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IGCSEStudent99)
    I hope that someone who isn't German and have already studied/is studying in Germany to tell me more about his/her experience
    Have a look here.
    https://www.reddit.com/r/German/
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    I am German and I have been considering studying medicine myself for soke time, so know a bit about it. Am also teaching German to English speakers right now.

    First thing you need to know is that medicine is really really popular in Germany, so with their schoolleaving grades only the best 1% get in. There is also a test which is mostly about memorizing, with this applicants can push their application grades a bit higher.
    Also extracurriculars and volunteering are not really considered by admissions, at least for German applicants.

    I believe everyday life in Germany you could master with a minimum of German knowledge, as most Germans speak English fairly well by now. However, as others already pointed out, studying itself is going to be very tough, although a lot of it will be memorizing, again.

    But as a German teacher myself and considering your grades I think learning enough in the time you have is possible

    Just make sure that when you are done with the foundation you will be most likely admitted. As there is usually no reference or personal statement involved, admissions are pretty predictable (and brutal, to be honest)
    And bear in mind that the things I told you may not apply to foreign applicants! You will have to contact admissions to be sure.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IGCSEStudent99)
    I hope that someone who isn't German and have already studied/is studying in Germany to tell me more about his/her experience
    TSR may not be your best bet, tbh - most of us are Brits applying to/studying at British universities. The few who do go to mainland Europe tend to go to the English-speaking courses in Poland/Czech republic etc.

    Why Germany in particular?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Helenia)
    TSR may not be your best bet, tbh - most of us are Brits applying to/studying at British universities. The few who do go to mainland Europe tend to go to the English-speaking courses in Poland/Czech republic etc.

    Why Germany in particular?
    Because it's free and medicine is usually expensive anywhere. Also, it provides top quality education. I will look into Poland/Czech.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IGCSEStudent99)
    I am going to study an undergraduate degree of medicine in Germany in German and yes I have started learning German a month ago. I will need to complete at least German level B1 to be able to study there! I do in fact meet the requirements but I will have to do a foundation year (Studienkolleg) to be prepared better for the university and improve my German too. What are your thoughts on this? Do you think I should do it or not? Please state the pros and cons. Thanks in advance!
    I'm considering doing the same as you! I suppose the pros of studying in Germany would be (eventually) having another language under your belt, and exposure to cultures as well as being part of the EU. I would definitely go for it. Which Unis did you apply to?
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.