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Tough love is what children need to become better people & become responsible adults Watch

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    And that will be achieved through a £35k School Detention Director in a London school.


    The headteacher has confirmed the role is "not suitable for a “would-be councillor or to someone who wants to be every child’s best friend”.

    The advert reads: “Do you like order and discipline? Do you believe in children being obedient every time? Do you believe that allowing children to make excuses is unkind?
    "Someone who believes children need clear, firm discipline.... someone who believes tough love is what children need to become better people and grow into responsible young adults.”
    The school's headteacher, termed the strictest headteacher in the UK by the Sunday Times said - “A Detention Director gives teachers back their time to do what they ought to be doing: teaching”

    You can read the full article here.

    Thoughts?

    Tough love or is understanding and coaching required in schools.
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    To be totally honest, I don't really get what she wants. Not suitable for someone who is a would-be councillor, yet has heart-to-hearts with the children and be an inspiration, as well as being a 'sergeant major'?

    We can't pander to every child's whim and not instil any discipline, but at the same time you can't expect any child to be 100% 'obedient' all of the time. It seems like this is too far, especially taking into account the lunch isolation.
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    That depends on the child.
    Some kids like competition and discipline and will thrive if the teacher is more demanding. I was that kind of kid. I had to be the best and if the teacher was not easily impressed it gave me inner power to study harder and I loved it when I was able to say one of the toughest teachers in school likes me.
    But I had friends who couldn't work under pressure. They were good students, but encouragement worked better on them. And they aren't irresponsible adults, they all go to uni and plan on doing masters (ok, not all but most).

    My point is, while some students may do better under a more demanding teachers, others will just shut down and grow to hate the subject, even if they have potential to be geniuses.
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    Having many friends who are teachers in schools of varying behaviour standards, I'm pretty sure every teacher would welcome a crackdown on discipline. The teachers I know went into the profession to teach, not to do crowd control or run a pre PRU. Whether this is actually going to make a difference is quite a different matter - it's probably going to end up as another variation on a warning system. The crappy behaviour endemic in too many state schools is one of the reasons most NQTs have left within five years (of course, there's other pressures such a league tables, ridiculous amounts of admin, lack of support etc too)
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    tbh if schools concentrated more on knowledge & facts instead of how to be a victim and have issues this country would be much better off.
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    (Original post by Nottie)
    My point is, while some students may do better under a more demanding teachers, others will just shut down and grow to hate the subject, even if they have potential to be geniuses.
    So, why not have the people in place who can drive the students who need / want the stick approach, while other members of staff can cajole and encourage the students who want the carrot approach?

    Just because different approaches work for different kids doesn't mean one approach should be ignored.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    So, why not have the people in place who can drive the students who need / want the stick approach, while other members of staff can cajole and encourage the students who want the carrot approach?

    Just because different approaches work for different kids doesn't mean one approach should be ignored.
    you should have both, but tbh having lay back teachers is probably less detrimential for 'tough love students' than having strict teacher is for 'needing encouragement students'
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    :rofl::rofl:

    Maybe for teachers. Having a parents smacking the argument out of you, isn't great tbh.
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    The school I went to tried something like this (by expanding an existing role, as opposed to inventing a whole new one) and it was such a failure they gave up after 1 term. The crackdown on bad behaviour kind of got out of hand when their were 45 people in one detention.
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    I think you need to use a stick approach because schools don't really have any carrots to dish out. Teachers can still be nice and understanding but they can't be matey. If kids know they can get away with bad behaviour, they will do it. The best teachers at my school definitely gave the students a sense of fear. It's not just disruptive behaviour. Even stuff like being late for class or not doing your homework, there were certain teachers you wouldn't dare do it to. If teachers can't use fear, they have no way of controlling the class.
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    As someone who grew up in an eyewateringly strict house, it depends on the child completely. My sister did well under the whole tough love thing. I on the other hand, rebelled. But I think it also depends what age you do it up to. If you do it once the kid's a teenager it'll cause nothing but hatred and resentment.
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    I think different kids need different approaches and often they need people to give them both. I don't think tough love means always being nasty and strict, sometimes it can mean giving an uncomfortable truth.
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    What? No, it's up to the parents to set it, detentions don't and never have worked for an extended period of time. Unless you want to put a kid in detention everyday, he'll revert back. Parents need to make them into people that don't need to worry about detentions but, of course, you've got idiots that don't get it, so they decide to disrupt class. That's why sets are great, the smart people who want to work at the top, and the idiots who don't at the bottom.
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    (Original post by She-Ra)
    And that will be achieved through a £35k School Detention Director in a London school.


    The headteacher has confirmed the role is "not suitable for a “would-be councillor or to someone who wants to be every child’s best friend”.





    The school's headteacher, termed the strictest headteacher in the UK by the Sunday Times said - “A Detention Director gives teachers back their time to do what they ought to be doing: teaching”

    You can read the full article here.

    Thoughts?

    Tough love or is understanding and coaching required in schools.
    what the ****... so ****ing dumb. schools seem to try to be this place where they mould every child into the same little shape and anyone who is out of line gets shouted at or punished.

    I read about a school where instead of detentions they give "meditation sessions" and it reduced bad behaviour by loads... but of course these days anything but aggression and anger and a strict rule is scorned at because there are a hell of a lot of bitter adults in this world.
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    I personally feel I would have responded better to firmer discipline. I was a lazy kid and didn't do homework or even study for my exams. Adults knew better than me that it's better to work hard in school, but without anyone effectively pushing me to do so I let the opportunity pass me by.

    I can't say I know it's the fault of a soft upbringing, but I was a weak kid who never had to push himself. If I ever have a kid I'll have no intention of allowing them cultivate a shyness of hard work.
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    In a school I would agree.

    I was going to write more but miser pretty much just summed up my life, creepy.
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    This is a really complex issue because some of the naughtiest kids are the most vulnerable and every child is different some will flourish with tough love and some will end up having their confidence kicked and turn in on themselves, as a result of effectively being kicked when they're down. For example if a child is misbehaving in school because they're experiencing abuse or poverty or other forms of deprivation which already take their toll on the child and which may not be known to the staff at school, tough love could be the worst appraoch and mean worse outcomes for these particularly vulnerable children. Employed at the right stage i.e. after factoring in any vulnerabilities...it could be helpful in terms of their academic performance.
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    Perfect job for my daddy then :rofl:
 
 
 
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