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Can Asperger syndrome be cured? Watch

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    (Original post by Arran90)
    Perhaps you should ask people with Asperger syndrome or autistic spectrum disorders, or the parents of children with these conditions, if they want to be cured. You will almost certainly find a high proportion of them want to be cured because of all the problems and heartache that these conditions cause.

    I suppose it's vaguely related to how a high proportion of introverts would rather be extroverts because they tend to be happier, more successful in life, and make more money.
    Maybe you should speak to people with those conditions and ask them if they want a cure? I've only met one person who wants a cure for her child. And that's only because her child's situation is far more complex. Like I've said, we have no idea what a cure will do to people. Most don't want a cure. We need people to accept and understand us. Is that really too much to ask?
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    Note: This is my first post, so please don't judge if I mess up.

    I have aspergers and I don't want a cure. Being normal doesn't have any appeal when you can be a special snowflake.
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    In theory it might be possible in the future to grow or stimulate the growth of areas in the brain to change people's neurology and in doing so ''cure'' Asperger's syndrome. In general I do not consider it to be a disease however so cure is the wrong word.
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    (Original post by doodle_333)
    Of course people CAN learn social skills. But as children our brains are far more malleable and we pick these things up without even thinking about it in an environment where it's acceptable that we will make mistakes. Doing it as an adult involves much more thought and effort and people will be less forgiving of mistakes. I live in another country and while the culture is not insanely different to the UK it's still taking a lot of effort to adjust.
    Does this have any connection with the theory in post #32?

    https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...2&postcount=32

    Most books and websites about social skills for adults are written for a neurotypical audience rather than one with Asperger syndrome or autistic spectrum disorders.

    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Maybe you should speak to people with those conditions and ask them if they want a cure? I've only met one person who wants a cure for her child. And that's only because her child's situation is far more complex. Like I've said, we have no idea what a cure will do to people. Most don't want a cure. We need people to accept and understand us. Is that really too much to ask?
    You have no idea who I communicate with outside of this forum. Over the years I have known many people with Asperger syndrome or autistic spectrum disorders. If they think that curing their condition will:

    1. Make them happier.

    2. Reduce the likelihood that they will upset people.

    3. Increase their social acceptance.

    then why shouldn't they go ahead and be cured?
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    (Original post by Arran90)
    You have no idea who I communicate with outside of this forum. Over the years I have known many people with Asperger syndrome or autistic spectrum disorders. If they think that curing their condition will:

    1. Make them happier.

    2. Reduce the likelihood that they will upset people.

    3. Increase their social acceptance.

    then why shouldn't they go ahead and be cured?
    And you too have no idea who I communicate with either. Genuine question, what do you really know about the condition? Most people I know don't want a cure. Mostly because as mentioned, we have no idea what it'll do to people. Like I've said, they tried to treat a serious condition I have and I ended up with various other medical problems as a result. I've now got to take other daily medication to stop the side effects of the other medication for the condition.

    We don't know whether a cure will make people happy or indeed whether society will actually accept them.

    You, in the nicest way possible, come across as someone whose just read a textbook on the condition who acts as though they know more than people who live with the condition.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    You, in the nicest way possible, come across as someone whose just read a textbook on the condition who acts as though they know more than people who live with the condition.
    I'm actually quite distrusting of textbooks about Asperger syndrome using knowledge I have acquired from meeting people in the flesh with the condition and from talking to clinical psychologists. I'm also critical of the NAS as experts in Asperger syndrome because their main emphasis is traditional lower-functioning autistic spectrum disorders and providing complex care services for a small number of people who require it.

    It seems like after complete ignorance of Asperger syndrome until 1995 an industrial complex has been created where countless books on the subject have been published and more keep being published every year.

    I raise questions as to whether there are differences between Asperger syndrome in the UK and the US due to differences in society, culture, the education system, and social expectations between the two countries.
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    Aspergers is a lifelong condition caused by being build differently to "normal" people. It cannot be cured. It has always and will always be part of them.
    You can however learn coping mechanisms and ways to make it affect you less. So somebody who had aspergers as a kid could appear not to as an adult, but only because they have learned ways to manage it.

    I'm sure there are also condition which could appear to be aspergers and lead to a wrong diagnosis. If that is the case and those conditions are cured or grown out of it could lead to the impression that their aspergers was cured.

    I would imagine that the reason a lot of people are "cured" actually just learned how to manage and hide it better. This can just come with age (like how most adults don't throw tantrums when they don't get the last lolly) so it is possible that even they could believe that they were "cured".

    I believe things like stress can also exacerbate things like aspergers so it's possible that a "severe" case would become far more mild if stress was relieved. A milder case could then easily appear to be a cure. This could come from the increased independence and control that tends to come with adulthood. That seems like a bit of a long shot to me, but it could at least have some impact.

    So in short, aspergers cannot be cured, but could appear to be for a variety of reasons.
    I am personally open to the idea however that there is a condition commonly confused with aspergers which either can be cured or naturally goes away with age.

    Do you mind me asking what evidence you have btw? This is somewhat interesting.
    I agree
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    (Original post by Emma:-))
    I agree
    If you go back to the OP then I mentioned "Those who have cured themselves usually do so around the age of 18 to 22" and "What is interesting is that neither of them were high academic achievers at school or had particularly good GCSE grades"

    This does shed light on the possibility that Asperger syndrome is caused by the way the brain shapes and wires itself at a young age when it is 'plastic' and that if it can be reshaped before it 'harden's then Asperger syndrome can be cured.

    A bold move that has been suggested by some parents of children with Asperger syndrome is to put the child's academic education on hold for a year or two during the ages 9 to 14 and devote the time to social activities instead.
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    (Original post by Arran90)
    If you go back to the OP then I mentioned "Those who have cured themselves usually do so around the age of 18 to 22" and "What is interesting is that neither of them were high academic achievers at school or had particularly good GCSE grades"
    Where's this evidence that people have cured themselves?
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    (Original post by Arran90)
    If you go back to the OP then I mentioned "Those who have cured themselves usually do so around the age of 18 to 22" and "What is interesting is that neither of them were high academic achievers at school or had particularly good GCSE grades"

    This does shed light on the possibility that Asperger syndrome is caused by the way the brain shapes and wires itself at a young age when it is 'plastic' and that if it can be reshaped before it 'harden's then Asperger syndrome can be cured.

    A bold move that has been suggested by some parents of children with Asperger syndrome is to put the child's academic education on hold for a year or two during the ages 9 to 14 and devote the time to social activities instead.
    Have you even read the responses to this thread? You don't cure it you cope with it.
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    I'm aware that many people despise bringing race into an argument but sometimes it is a factor that should not be overlooked...

    An unanswered question is why Asperger syndrome and high-functioning autistic spectrum disorders are so rare in people of black Jamaican origin who live in Britain. Accurate figures for people of different races do not exist but the rarity of black Jamaicans with these conditions is quite well known amongst the grassroots Asperger syndrome community, although the NAS denies that autistic spectrum disorders are more or less prevalent in people from particular races or ethnic group. The issue has been discussed more than once at my local Asperger syndrome support group and how there are many times more south Asians with Asperger syndrome and high-functioning autistic spectrum disorders than there are black Jamaicans.

    Questions have been raised as to whether it's nature or nurture. Are black Jamaicans, and their ancestral tribes from Africa, genetically less likely to develop Asperger syndrome and high-functioning autistic spectrum disorders than Europeans and south Asians are, or is it largely the result of the laid-back Jamaican culture reducing the likelihood that young children's minds are shaped and wired to cause these conditions?

    Black Jamaican parents are far less keen on pushing their children academically at a young age than middle class white British and south Asian parents are. Something I have noticed is that black Jamaican youngsters tend to be more extroverted and outgoing than white British youngsters are. At school they tend to shy away from STEM subjects and gravitate towards outgoing subjects like music, PE, and drama. I have been verbally informed that black Jamaican children in reception class tend to be behind with mathematics and reading but are usually ahead physically and socially. Dyspraxia and poor physical co-ordination is also rare amongst black Jamaican children.

    Also, have a look at my discussion about the popularity of Jamaican culture

    https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=4579550
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    Are you aware that Autism isn't just about academics? I have Autism which for me causes pretty severe communication and relationship difficulties. Academics wise - I wasn't too bad. Although, most of my struggles were down to how I understood things down to my communication difficulties. (I take things literally)
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Are you aware that Autism isn't just about academics? I have Autism which for me causes pretty severe communication and relationship difficulties. Academics wise - I wasn't too bad. Although, most of my struggles were down to how I understood things down to my communication difficulties. (I take things literally)
    Yes. I'm very well aware that autistic spectrum disorders are not just about academics. This is why there is high-functioning autism and low-functioning autism. Autism is about the lack of ability to read people or pick up social cues, and certain communication and relationship difficulties.

    As I previously stated in post #81 people with high-functioning autism are not necessarily good scholars even if they exhibit a generally high level of intelligence or ability with reading and mathematics.

    https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...6&postcount=81

    It's questionable with Asperger syndrome and high-functioning autistic spectrum disorders is a learning difficulty. If people with the conditions struggle to learn in a school or university setting then I see it primarily as a learning difference. This is because they are capable of learning advanced material but not necessarily under the style of teaching and learning used at school or university.

    It's notable that many people with Asperger syndrome and high-functioning autistic spectrum disorders have a high level of factual intelligence but lack everyday life skills.
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    (Original post by Arran90)
    This is why there is high-functioning autism and low-functioning autism.
    These labels are actually an insult.
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    Well everyone has neurones. I would say high functioning yes. Low functioning no in the old days doctors would have said they were retarded which is a French translation for slow. I met a university lecturer who taught himself to teach all types of people I think it won't matter if they hate learning or not.
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    (Original post by Arran90)
    Does this have any connection with the theory in post #32?

    https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...2&postcount=32

    Most books and websites about social skills for adults are written for a neurotypical audience rather than one with Asperger syndrome or autistic spectrum disorders.
    No it doesn't have a connection. There simply isn't some sort of balancing situation at play here between academics and autistic spectrum conditions. For a start plenty of autistic people aren't that bright or academic and plenty of non autistic people are brilliant both academically and socially. Learning both is perfectly possible.


    You have no idea who I communicate with outside of this forum. Over the years I have known many people with Asperger syndrome or autistic spectrum disorders. If they think that curing their condition will:

    1. Make them happier.

    2. Reduce the likelihood that they will upset people.

    3. Increase their social acceptance.

    then why shouldn't they go ahead and be cured?
    I think you're missing the point. TigerRag is saying that a 'cure' often isn't as simple as it sounds. Taking medication or having invasive surgery or therapy or whatever the 'cure' ended up being could have a huge negative effect on people's lives anyway - possibly just as much as their autism. You're also refusing to accept that some people can be happy with who they are - even if who they are isn't 'perfect' in the eyes of general society. Plus changing something so fundamental about the way people interact with the world would pretty much be making them an entirely new person... If I think of my autistic family member being 'cured' - well they just wouldn't be them anymore, I have no idea just how different they would be, that's pretty sad to me. And I'm sure plenty of people feel the same about themselves.

    (Original post by Arran90)
    I'm aware that many people despise bringing race into an argument but sometimes it is a factor that should not be overlooked...

    An unanswered question is why Asperger syndrome and high-functioning autistic spectrum disorders are so rare in people of black Jamaican origin who live in Britain. Accurate figures for people of different races do not exist but the rarity of black Jamaicans with these conditions is quite well known amongst the grassroots Asperger syndrome community, although the NAS denies that autistic spectrum disorders are more or less prevalent in people from particular races or ethnic group. The issue has been discussed more than once at my local Asperger syndrome support group and how there are many times more south Asians with Asperger syndrome and high-functioning autistic spectrum disorders than there are black Jamaicans.

    Questions have been raised as to whether it's nature or nurture. Are black Jamaicans, and their ancestral tribes from Africa, genetically less likely to develop Asperger syndrome and high-functioning autistic spectrum disorders than Europeans and south Asians are, or is it largely the result of the laid-back Jamaican culture reducing the likelihood that young children's minds are shaped and wired to cause these conditions?

    Black Jamaican parents are far less keen on pushing their children academically at a young age than middle class white British and south Asian parents are. Something I have noticed is that black Jamaican youngsters tend to be more extroverted and outgoing than white British youngsters are. At school they tend to shy away from STEM subjects and gravitate towards outgoing subjects like music, PE, and drama. I have been verbally informed that black Jamaican children in reception class tend to be behind with mathematics and reading but are usually ahead physically and socially. Dyspraxia and poor physical co-ordination is also rare amongst black Jamaican children.

    Also, have a look at my discussion about the popularity of Jamaican culture

    https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=4579550
    What you've said really means nothing and mixes up correlation and causation. Culturally east asians and jamaicans are very different to white westerners but that doesn't mean one random cultural factor you picked out causes differences in levels of autism. For a start there's no significant evidence autism prevalence does vary. A large part of any variance which is found is likely to be cultural awareness and willingness to get a diagnosis combined with ease of accessing health professionals (which tends to be easier for white people). You also have to consider different presentations of autism - girls are hugely underdiagnosed because they present slightly differently to boys, this could also happy with other races and cultures. Even if there was a difference that doesn't mean it is a result of upbringing and attitude to education - it could also be genetic.
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    What I'll do when I raise a kid myself: I'll disregard any "expertise" with regards to any kind of autism, and make sure my child is developing at the rate that is expected of him or her by society. I will allow him or her to flourish at whatever he or she takes an interest in, unless it has no relevance in later life (that would include the majority of fiction- based franchises). While it disappoints many people that schools have become purely academic factories that churn out exam-passers, at the end of the day we don't decide what the schools do to our children so it's up to us parents to teach what schools don't. So I'd be responsible for the social skills, or lack of, that my child has at adult life. It's time for the "no excuses" leadership post-Brexit that will create a strong-willed, rather than dependent, generation.
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    I'd like to congratulate this thread on lasting for as long as it did without a Brexit comment.
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    I hold the view that Asperger syndrome and autistic spectrum disorders are only partially understood conditions and what is known is just the tip of the iceberg. There are numerous unanswered questions about these conditions but whether anybody is interested in finding answers is a different matter.

    An entire industrial complex has been created around autistic spectrum disorders with lucrative organisations like the NAS and Jessica Kingsley Publishers. A cynical argument could be that people are more interested in making money from autistic spectrum disorders rather than researching causes of them. It suits certain organisations just fine to assume that autistic spectrum disorders are incurable because they make money from them or do not want to spend money researching them.

    One possible pathway to a better understanding will be to get away from the British and American sphere that currently dominates understanding of autistic spectrum disorders and embrace findings from countries with different cultures and speak languages other than English.
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    Yes you can cure yourself to a degree, By studying psychology and social skills intensely for a couple of years I finally cured myself. It cannot be cured by means of medicine, only by comprehending social skills and destroying fear.

    You cannot cure Asperger syndrome to the degree of abandoning your means of learning, in that you will always want to learn independently and indepth naturally. This will constantly be latent.

    Be aware that this is my belief and there is a stark divide in psychology whether it can be cured or not. Therefore you will meet people who agree it can be cured, or people who refute this notion.
 
 
 
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