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    (Original post by Michiyo)
    But what if their culture, norms, and values are completely against that of the country they are in? What if they do not consider themselves to be so? I
    I do not believe someone can grow up in a country and not share that country's cultural norms, attitudes and values - but even if you are right and they don't share them, it is irrelevant - they are still Romanian.

    (Original post by EC)
    Most of them haven't always lived in Romania, didn't go to school at all and don't even speak the language.
    Yes they have. Yes they did. Yes they do.

    Neither of you answered my earlier question, do you think someone of Indian descent (but who was born and grew up in the UK) is British?
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    (Original post by Coup d'etat)
    It does. You will always be the gender you are born as. Changing your appearance doesn't change your DNA and chromosomes.
    You only think in black and white? If you follow this principle and following what you've just said then what is written in your passport is pointless because it doesn't change someone's ancestry.
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    (Original post by EC)
    You only think in black and white? If you follow this principle and following what you've just said then what is written in your passport is pointless because it doesn't change someone's ancestry.
    They are not related in any way. How many times do I have to tell you that ethnicity and nationality have no relevance on each other?
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    (Original post by ChickenMadness)
    Romania best country EU?
    LOL, far from it.
    No idea how Romania even made it into the EU.

    Sure it has lovely people though
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    (Original post by Michiyo)
    OMG a peaceful post! IDK who you are, but I love you! :hugs:

    Make sure to try the food :daydreaming:
    Oh thanks haha

    Is the food really nice there too? What type of foods do you get there and what are the main ingredients in them?


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    (Original post by Coup d'etat)
    They are not related in any way. How many times do I have to tell you that ethnicity and nationality have no relevance on each other?
    And gender and sex are distinct because whilst sex refers to the biological differences between males and females, gender is the individual's concept of themselves.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    I do not believe someone can grow up in a country and not share that country's cultural norms, attitudes and values - but even if you are right and they don't share them, it is irrelevant - they are still Romanian.
    You don't believe something that is true, happens here too, state it must happen and then state it's irrelevant because it doesn't fit in with your argument? Sheesh.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    I do not believe someone can grow up in a country and not share that country's cultural norms, attitudes and values - but even if you are right and they don't share them, it is irrelevant - they are still Romanian.

    Yes they have. Yes they did. Yes they do.

    Neither of you answered my earlier question, do you think someone of Indian descent (but who was born and grew up in the UK) is British?
    Come to Romania and watch plenty of gypsies do exactly that, then

    How would you know that? The answer is actually no. A lot of them do not go to school. Some do, but even when they do, they are usually not the brightest and most hard-working of students. For example, I used to have this gypsy classmate in primary school. She dropped out after she had to repeat second grade (Year 3) since she failed it. I did have two gypsy girls in my high school class and they did pass the Baccalaureate (I think, one of them might have failed it), but with the lowest passing grade. As for the language, a lot of them do speak Romanian, but with terrible grammar and a different accent than Romanians.

    I believe that depends on whether they consider themselves to be British or not.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    I do not believe someone can grow up in a country and not share that country's cultural norms, attitudes and values - but even if you are right and they don't share them, it is irrelevant - they are still Romanian.



    Yes they have. Yes they did. Yes they do.

    Neither of you answered my earlier question, do you think someone of Indian descent (but who was born and grew up in the UK) is British?
    Have you ever lived in Romania or even visited for more than a few days? Have you ever discussed with them? Have you even met a Gypsy person?

    You don't even know much about the situation in the country.

    Depends on what nation they feel like they belong to. It's about patriotism and if their beliefs and values and assumptions represent their national's identity.

    Most Romani follow their own cuisine and their own traditions and most importantly they didn't incorporate the national identity into their individual identity because they practice every day their beliefs and own habits, most of them also only prefer to speak their language.
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    (Original post by Rakes)
    Oh thanks haha

    Is the food really nice there too? What type of foods do you get there and what are the main ingredients in them?


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    Every single dish is delicious! Here is a list of food I gave someone on TSR once.

    Șnițel (schnitzel) is my favourite food ever and although it originated from Germany/Austria, it has become a traditional dish in Romania. It is meat (most commonly chicken breast, sometimes pork thigh or turkey breast) that is beaten with a special hammer, then covered in egg and flour or egg and breadcrumbs.

    Sarmale is a well-known traditional dish which is basically boiled mincemeat in lettuce leaves (there are some more ingredients like rice but I do not like sarmale do IDK what they are).

    Biscuit salami (salam de biscuiți) is exactly what it sounds like: a salami-shaped sweet treat made with biscuits, chocolate, and often Turkish delight, nuts, and/or coconut.

    Mămăligă is basically what Romanians used instead of bread years ago and it is still eaten nowadays; it is made by boiling hominy and salt and letting it cool for a bit in order for it to take a soft solid shape.

    Supă de găluște (literally 'dumplings soup', which is more or less accurate) is a traditional soup. The 'dumplings' are made with eggs, salt, a bit of oil, and semolina, which are mixed until the dumplings are neither liquid not solid. These dumplings are formed with the spoon you are mixing them with and thrown into the soup one by one. The soup base itself only has salt, pepper, oil, parsley, and light-colored vegetables (like carrots or parsnip), and maybe sour cream if you feel like it. It is also delicious.

    Ciorbă de fasole (a kind of beans soup, though it is not a soup, it is a ciorbă, which is a variation of soup) is delicious and is made by boiling beans, tomatoes, and whatever other vegetables you feel like putting in with salt. It is important to note that the end result will be mainly liquid, the only solids being the beans and the vegetables.

    Ciorbă de perișoare (which is apparently some kind of soup with meatballs, though they are not exactly meatballs) is also a ciorbă, but with slightly different ingredients (tomatoes are not a must here) and those meatball-like things.

    Lapte de pasăre (literally 'bird milk' - misleading name) is a sweet food made by boiling milk, adding in some really soft and non-liquid/non-solid dumplings made of sugar and egg whites, and finally adding vanilla pudding. It is delicious and the dumplings end up more or less solid.

    We also have musaca, which we took from the Turks; it is made by putting a bed of boiled potatoes on a baking tray, adding mincemeat with egg, another sliced boiled potatoes layer, and ketchup over the top (but not over the entire top, just a bit), then baking it. It is delicious, of course.

    We also have budincă de cartofi (literally 'potato pudding' - misleading name again), which is made by boiling cut potatoes, mixing them with egg and cheese, putting the mix on a baking tray, adding a layer of egg on top, and baking it. I love this dish too since it is sooo good.

    There is also cozonac. This is a traditional type of cake made for Christmas, Easter, etc. There are many variations but all of them use a base made of flour, egg, oil, sugar, salt, and milk, moulded in a special baking tray. The filling can be Turkish delight, nuts, cocoa, fruits, etc.

    Mici (literally 'littles') are basically tiny cylinders of mincemeat about as thick as two fingers and as long as your little figer which are grilled (or, very rarely, fried). Often served with mustard and bread, sometimes with ketchup. They are delicious as well.
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    (Original post by Michiyo)
    Every single dish is delicious! Here is a list of food I gave someone on TSR once.

    Șnițel (schnitzel) is my favourite food ever and although it originated from Germany/Austria, it has become a traditional dish in Romania. It is meat (most commonly chicken breast, sometimes pork thigh or turkey breast) that is beaten with a special hammer, then covered in egg and flour or egg and breadcrumbs.

    Sarmale is a well-known traditional dish which is basically boiled mincemeat in lettuce leaves (there are some more ingredients like rice but I do not like sarmale do IDK what they are).

    Biscuit salami (salam de biscuiți) is exactly what it sounds like: a salami-shaped sweet treat made with biscuits, chocolate, and often Turkish delight, nuts, and/or coconut.

    Mămăligă is basically what Romanians used instead of bread years ago and it is still eaten nowadays; it is made by boiling hominy and salt and letting it cool for a bit in order for it to take a soft solid shape.

    Supă de găluște (literally 'dumplings soup', which is more or less accurate) is a traditional soup. The 'dumplings' are made with eggs, salt, a bit of oil, and semolina, which are mixed until the dumplings are neither liquid not solid. These dumplings are formed with the spoon you are mixing them with and thrown into the soup one by one. The soup base itself only has salt, pepper, oil, parsley, and light-colored vegetables (like carrots or parsnip), and maybe sour cream if you feel like it. It is also delicious.

    Ciorbă de fasole (a kind of beans soup, though it is not a soup, it is a ciorbă, which is a variation of soup) is delicious and is made by boiling beans, tomatoes, and whatever other vegetables you feel like putting in with salt. It is important to note that the end result will be mainly liquid, the only solids being the beans and the vegetables.

    Ciorbă de perișoare (which is apparently some kind of soup with meatballs, though they are not exactly meatballs) is also a ciorbă, but with slightly different ingredients (tomatoes are not a must here) and those meatball-like things.

    Lapte de pasăre (literally 'bird milk' - misleading name) is a sweet food made by boiling milk, adding in some really soft and non-liquid/non-solid dumplings made of sugar and egg whites, and finally adding vanilla pudding. It is delicious and the dumplings end up more or less solid.

    We also have musaca, which we took from the Turks; it is made by putting a bed of boiled potatoes on a baking tray, adding mincemeat with egg, another sliced boiled potatoes layer, and ketchup over the top (but not over the entire top, just a bit), then baking it. It is delicious, of course.

    We also have budincă de cartofi (literally 'potato pudding' - misleading name again), which is made by boiling cut potatoes, mixing them with egg and cheese, putting the mix on a baking tray, adding a layer of egg on top, and baking it. I love this dish too since it is sooo good.

    There is also cozonac. This is a traditional type of cake made for Christmas, Easter, etc. There are many variations but all of them use a base made of flour, egg, oil, sugar, salt, and milk, moulded in a special baking tray. The filling can be Turkish delight, nuts, cocoa, fruits, etc.

    Mici (literally 'littles' are basically tiny cylinders of mincemeat about as thick as two fingers and as long as your little figer which are grilled (or, very rarely, fried). Often served with mustard and bread, sometimes with ketchup. They are delicious as well.
    Wow. Amazing as always!!!!!! You're so wonderful. :heart:

    I love our soups. They are so tasty. There is also the tripe soup with vinegar and sour cream yummmmm.

    Everyone should try these dishes at least once in their life.
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    (Original post by PandaSal)
    You don't believe something that is true, happens here too, state it must happen and then state it's irrelevant because it doesn't fit in with your argument? Sheesh.
    It really is irrelevant though. Put it another way, if JK Rowling hated the Queen, loathed democracy and freedom of speech, didn't like tea, or Shakespeare, or crumpets, or the BBC, and pretty much hated everything about the UK - that would not stop her being British.

    (Original post by Michiyo)
    I believe that depends on whether they consider themselves to be British or not.
    You can't ask every person in the world "what do you consider yourself to be?", so I ask again, assuming you don't know the individual or what nationality they identify with, do you think this person is British or not?

    (Original post by EC)
    Have you ever lived in Romania or even visited for more than a few days? Have you ever discussed with them? Have you even met a Gypsy person?

    You don't even know much about the situation in the country.

    Depends on what nation they feel like they belong to. It's about patriotism and if their beliefs and values and assumptions represent their national's identity.

    Most Romani follow their own cuisine and their own traditions and most importantly they didn't incorporate the national identity into their individual identity because they practice every day their beliefs and own habits, most of them also only prefer to speak their language.
    No, I have not lived in or been to Romania, but I do read and I am reasonably familiar with the country. I'm not an expert by any means, but I know enough to know that you are misrepresenting the Roma. I do not doubt that many are alienated from Romanian society, although whether that is out of choice or because of institutional and country-wide xenophobia and racism is up for debate.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    It really is irrelevant though. Put it another way, if JK Rowling hated the Queen, loathed democracy and freedom of speech, didn't like tea, or Shakespeare, or crumpets, or the BBC, and pretty much hated everything about the UK - that would not stop her being British.



    You can't ask every person in the world "what do you consider yourself to be?", so I ask again, assuming you don't know the individual or what nationality they identify with, do you think this person is British or not?



    No, I have not lived in or been to Romania, but I do read and I am reasonably familiar with the country. I'm not an expert by any means, but I know enough to know that you are misrepresenting the Roma. I do not doubt that many are alienated from Romanian society, although whether that is out of choice or because of institutional and country-wide xenophobia and racism is up for debate.
    You are referring to one person whilst we are referring to an entire group of people who act like this.
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    (Original post by EC)
    You are referring to one person whilst we are referring to an entire group of people who act like this.
    I don't follow, what one person am I referring to?
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    (Original post by Michiyo)
    Every single dish is delicious! Here is a list of food I gave someone on TSR once.

    Șnițel (schnitzel) is my favourite food ever and although it originated from Germany/Austria, it has become a traditional dish in Romania. It is meat (most commonly chicken breast, sometimes pork thigh or turkey breast) that is beaten with a special hammer, then covered in egg and flour or egg and breadcrumbs.

    Sarmale is a well-known traditional dish which is basically boiled mincemeat in lettuce leaves (there are some more ingredients like rice but I do not like sarmale do IDK what they are).

    Biscuit salami (salam de biscuiți) is exactly what it sounds like: a salami-shaped sweet treat made with biscuits, chocolate, and often Turkish delight, nuts, and/or coconut.

    Mămăligă is basically what Romanians used instead of bread years ago and it is still eaten nowadays; it is made by boiling hominy and salt and letting it cool for a bit in order for it to take a soft solid shape.

    Supă de găluște (literally 'dumplings soup', which is more or less accurate) is a traditional soup. The 'dumplings' are made with eggs, salt, a bit of oil, and semolina, which are mixed until the dumplings are neither liquid not solid. These dumplings are formed with the spoon you are mixing them with and thrown into the soup one by one. The soup base itself only has salt, pepper, oil, parsley, and light-colored vegetables (like carrots or parsnip), and maybe sour cream if you feel like it. It is also delicious.

    Ciorbă de fasole (a kind of beans soup, though it is not a soup, it is a ciorbă, which is a variation of soup) is delicious and is made by boiling beans, tomatoes, and whatever other vegetables you feel like putting in with salt. It is important to note that the end result will be mainly liquid, the only solids being the beans and the vegetables.

    Ciorbă de perișoare (which is apparently some kind of soup with meatballs, though they are not exactly meatballs) is also a ciorbă, but with slightly different ingredients (tomatoes are not a must here) and those meatball-like things.

    Lapte de pasăre (literally 'bird milk' - misleading name) is a sweet food made by boiling milk, adding in some really soft and non-liquid/non-solid dumplings made of sugar and egg whites, and finally adding vanilla pudding. It is delicious and the dumplings end up more or less solid.

    We also have musaca, which we took from the Turks; it is made by putting a bed of boiled potatoes on a baking tray, adding mincemeat with egg, another sliced boiled potatoes layer, and ketchup over the top (but not over the entire top, just a bit), then baking it. It is delicious, of course.

    We also have budincă de cartofi (literally 'potato pudding' - misleading name again), which is made by boiling cut potatoes, mixing them with egg and cheese, putting the mix on a baking tray, adding a layer of egg on top, and baking it. I love this dish too since it is sooo good.

    There is also cozonac. This is a traditional type of cake made for Christmas, Easter, etc. There are many variations but all of them use a base made of flour, egg, oil, sugar, salt, and milk, moulded in a special baking tray. The filling can be Turkish delight, nuts, cocoa, fruits, etc.

    Mici (literally 'littles') are basically tiny cylinders of mincemeat about as thick as two fingers and as long as your little figer which are grilled (or, very rarely, fried). Often served with mustard and bread, sometimes with ketchup. They are delicious as well.
    Damn....soo many dishes and so much variety haha.
    They really do sound delicious! :yy:

    Wouldnt mind having the ciorbas as a starter, then moving onto the snitel and salarme as a main and some nice cozonac to finish off as dessert haha.

    Well If I ever go Romania Ik who to call haha.
    Great effort with the answer too btw!
    After reading this, I wouldnt be surprised if more people on this go find a romanian restaurant or buy these foods online lol.

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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    It really is irrelevant though. Put it another way, if JK Rowling hated the Queen, loathed democracy and freedom of speech, didn't like tea, or Shakespeare, or crumpets, or the BBC, and pretty much hated everything about the UK - that would not stop her being British.
    Oh it would stop her from being British, you can't hate the Queen, not drink tea or like the BBC and still consider yourself British.
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    Not a patch on the rural west midlands
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    (Original post by Michiyo)
    Every single dish is delicious! Here is a list of food I gave someone on TSR once.

    Șnițel (schnitzel) is my favourite food ever and although it originated from Germany/Austria, it has become a traditional dish in Romania. It is meat (most commonly chicken breast, sometimes pork thigh or turkey breast) that is beaten with a special hammer, then covered in egg and flour or egg and breadcrumbs.

    Sarmale is a well-known traditional dish which is basically boiled mincemeat in lettuce leaves (there are some more ingredients like rice but I do not like sarmale do IDK what they are).

    Biscuit salami (salam de biscuiți) is exactly what it sounds like: a salami-shaped sweet treat made with biscuits, chocolate, and often Turkish delight, nuts, and/or coconut.

    Mămăligă is basically what Romanians used instead of bread years ago and it is still eaten nowadays; it is made by boiling hominy and salt and letting it cool for a bit in order for it to take a soft solid shape.

    Supă de găluște (literally 'dumplings soup', which is more or less accurate) is a traditional soup. The 'dumplings' are made with eggs, salt, a bit of oil, and semolina, which are mixed until the dumplings are neither liquid not solid. These dumplings are formed with the spoon you are mixing them with and thrown into the soup one by one. The soup base itself only has salt, pepper, oil, parsley, and light-colored vegetables (like carrots or parsnip), and maybe sour cream if you feel like it. It is also delicious.

    Ciorbă de fasole (a kind of beans soup, though it is not a soup, it is a ciorbă, which is a variation of soup) is delicious and is made by boiling beans, tomatoes, and whatever other vegetables you feel like putting in with salt. It is important to note that the end result will be mainly liquid, the only solids being the beans and the vegetables.

    Ciorbă de perișoare (which is apparently some kind of soup with meatballs, though they are not exactly meatballs) is also a ciorbă, but with slightly different ingredients (tomatoes are not a must here) and those meatball-like things.

    Lapte de pasăre (literally 'bird milk' - misleading name) is a sweet food made by boiling milk, adding in some really soft and non-liquid/non-solid dumplings made of sugar and egg whites, and finally adding vanilla pudding. It is delicious and the dumplings end up more or less solid.

    We also have musaca, which we took from the Turks; it is made by putting a bed of boiled potatoes on a baking tray, adding mincemeat with egg, another sliced boiled potatoes layer, and ketchup over the top (but not over the entire top, just a bit), then baking it. It is delicious, of course.

    We also have budincă de cartofi (literally 'potato pudding' - misleading name again), which is made by boiling cut potatoes, mixing them with egg and cheese, putting the mix on a baking tray, adding a layer of egg on top, and baking it. I love this dish too since it is sooo good.

    There is also cozonac. This is a traditional type of cake made for Christmas, Easter, etc. There are many variations but all of them use a base made of flour, egg, oil, sugar, salt, and milk, moulded in a special baking tray. The filling can be Turkish delight, nuts, cocoa, fruits, etc.

    Mici (literally 'littles' are basically tiny cylinders of mincemeat about as thick as two fingers and as long as your little figer which are grilled (or, very rarely, fried). Often served with mustard and bread, sometimes with ketchup. They are delicious as well.
    (Original post by EC)
    Wow. Amazing as always!!!!!! You're so wonderful. :heart:

    I love our soups. They are so tasty. There is also the tripe soup with vinegar and sour cream yummmmm.

    Everyone should try these dishes at least once in their life.
    Which one of you will cook for me when I visit?
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    (Original post by Michiyo)
    Every single dish is delicious! Here is a list of food I gave someone on TSR once.

    Șnițel (schnitzel) is my favourite food ever and although it originated from Germany/Austria, it has become a traditional dish in Romania. It is meat (most commonly chicken breast, sometimes pork thigh or turkey breast) that is beaten with a special hammer, then covered in egg and flour or egg and breadcrumbs.

    Sarmale is a well-known traditional dish which is basically boiled mincemeat in lettuce leaves (there are some more ingredients like rice but I do not like sarmale do IDK what they are).

    Biscuit salami (salam de biscuiți) is exactly what it sounds like: a salami-shaped sweet treat made with biscuits, chocolate, and often Turkish delight, nuts, and/or coconut.

    Mămăligă is basically what Romanians used instead of bread years ago and it is still eaten nowadays; it is made by boiling hominy and salt and letting it cool for a bit in order for it to take a soft solid shape.

    Supă de găluște (literally 'dumplings soup', which is more or less accurate) is a traditional soup. The 'dumplings' are made with eggs, salt, a bit of oil, and semolina, which are mixed until the dumplings are neither liquid not solid. These dumplings are formed with the spoon you are mixing them with and thrown into the soup one by one. The soup base itself only has salt, pepper, oil, parsley, and light-colored vegetables (like carrots or parsnip), and maybe sour cream if you feel like it. It is also delicious.

    Ciorbă de fasole (a kind of beans soup, though it is not a soup, it is a ciorbă, which is a variation of soup) is delicious and is made by boiling beans, tomatoes, and whatever other vegetables you feel like putting in with salt. It is important to note that the end result will be mainly liquid, the only solids being the beans and the vegetables.

    Ciorbă de perișoare (which is apparently some kind of soup with meatballs, though they are not exactly meatballs) is also a ciorbă, but with slightly different ingredients (tomatoes are not a must here) and those meatball-like things.

    Lapte de pasăre (literally 'bird milk' - misleading name) is a sweet food made by boiling milk, adding in some really soft and non-liquid/non-solid dumplings made of sugar and egg whites, and finally adding vanilla pudding. It is delicious and the dumplings end up more or less solid.

    We also have musaca, which we took from the Turks; it is made by putting a bed of boiled potatoes on a baking tray, adding mincemeat with egg, another sliced boiled potatoes layer, and ketchup over the top (but not over the entire top, just a bit), then baking it. It is delicious, of course.

    We also have budincă de cartofi (literally 'potato pudding' - misleading name again), which is made by boiling cut potatoes, mixing them with egg and cheese, putting the mix on a baking tray, adding a layer of egg on top, and baking it. I love this dish too since it is sooo good.

    There is also cozonac. This is a traditional type of cake made for Christmas, Easter, etc. There are many variations but all of them use a base made of flour, egg, oil, sugar, salt, and milk, moulded in a special baking tray. The filling can be Turkish delight, nuts, cocoa, fruits, etc.

    Mici (literally 'littles') are basically tiny cylinders of mincemeat about as thick as two fingers and as long as your little figer which are grilled (or, very rarely, fried). Often served with mustard and bread, sometimes with ketchup. They are delicious as well.
    Omg this list! :woo:

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