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    I haven't visited a job agency in a long time and I have a few questions.

    Can you just walk in?

    You use to be able to book an interview/meeting with them and they would help you find work and offer advice. Do they still do this? Can't seem to find out online. (I know I could phone them)

    But which agencies are useful? Do you recommend any?

    Should I visit an agency in the location I'm interested in working?

    To help, I am looking for basic office work 9-5 in London. It may not narrow it down too much...

    Thanks.
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    (Original post by Grog)
    I haven't visited a job agency in a long time and I have a few questions.

    Can you just walk in?

    You use to be able to book an interview/meeting with them and they would help you find work and offer advice. Do they still do this? Can't seem to find out online. (I know I could phone them)

    But which agencies are useful? Do you recommend any?

    Should I visit an agency in the location I'm interested in working?

    To help, I am looking for basic office work 9-5 in London. It may not narrow it down too much...

    Thanks.
    You would have to ring them up and have a chat first to see what they can do for you. If they think you are worthy candidate to keep in their books, then they will set an appointment and meeting with you. You can't just simply walk in to see a specific Recruitment Consultant; they are very busy people and often go out of the office to visit potential clients to get candidates work.
    To be honest recruitment agencies are a mixed bag you get some good and bad ones, so there aren't any specifically 'good' to recommend as it really depends on how much work they can get from clients.
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    (Original post by Grog)
    I haven't visited a job agency in a long time and I have a few questions.

    Can you just walk in?

    You use to be able to book an interview/meeting with them and they would help you find work and offer advice. Do they still do this? Can't seem to find out online. (I know I could phone them)

    But which agencies are useful? Do you recommend any?

    Should I visit an agency in the location I'm interested in working?

    To help, I am looking for basic office work 9-5 in London. It may not narrow it down too much...

    Thanks.
    I would agree with Boreism that you are better off calling first, highlighting your skills and experience and the work you want. Saves you a wasted journey if the agency isn't interested or isn't any good. Then some agencies should invite you for an appointment if they think they have suitable vacancies. Be prepared to answer the following questions at some point: what are you doing currently, what roles you are looking for, what location- within London too- e.g. just zone 1 or are you prepared to travel further, what pay you want.

    The thing to remember with agencies/recruiters is that they are working in their own interests i.e. to make commision from placing someone in a job rather than spending hours searching for a suitable vacancy for someone. So generally you have to make regular contact with them rather than just sitting back waiting for them to contact you.
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    (Original post by Grog)
    I haven't visited a job agency in a long time and I have a few questions.

    Can you just walk in?

    You use to be able to book an interview/meeting with them and they would help you find work and offer advice. Do they still do this? Can't seem to find out online. (I know I could phone them)

    But which agencies are useful? Do you recommend any?

    Should I visit an agency in the location I'm interested in working?

    To help, I am looking for basic office work 9-5 in London. It may not narrow it down too much...

    Thanks.
    Hi,

    Based on your post, it seems that you are after basic office work. Now, the term "basic office work" is too ambiguous and vague. You will need to narrow that down. Managers, IT professionals, accountants, investment bankers and even administrators work in offices. The list goes on.

    With regards to working in an office and agencies in general - I strongly suggest you create a LinkedIn profile and really sell yourself on there. Companies are constantly posting new entry level jobs on there and with the right profile - you have a good chance. In fact, by applying through LinkedIn - you are applying directly and therefore eliminating the whole agency business which can be a good thing as you will be paid properly, i.e. no commission take out of your salary.

    Invest in a good C.V too, and use that when applying for jobs online. Sometimes it can be good to avoid agencies - I use agencies as a last resort.
 
 
 
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