Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Drewski)
    This was 3 years ago. It's now happening in Austria too.
    Do you have a link to the story? I just tried googling the topic and there are references to it in France. I know some SMEs in particular in the EU object to hiring or interviewing EU workers, but that happens here too. I don't see it as a general thing - as attested to by the fact that many hundreds of thousands of British people work regularly in Europe.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Do you have a link to the story? I just tried googling the topic and there are references to it in France. I know some SMEs in particular in the EU object to hiring or interviewing EU workers, but that happens here too. I don't see it as a general thing - as attested to by the fact that many hundreds of thousands of British people work regularly in Europe.
    Search "British ski instructor arrested". There are plenty of hits.
    That was worst case, but in many more cases the employing of Brits - or anyone not French, Italian or Austrian, depending on which country you're in - is simply banned.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Drewski)
    Search "British ski instructor arrested". There are plenty of hits.
    That was worst case, but in many more cases the employing of Brits - or anyone not French, Italian or Austrian, depending on which country you're in - is simply banned.
    Looks like an extreme case of locals defending their turf being seized on by the Mail and UKIP, although the facts of the case (if accurately reported) are pretty awful. I am no defender of France's many egregious and blatant breaches of EU law, but then don't kippers constantly moan about Britain having been forced to obey those same laws?
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Looks like an extreme case of locals defending their turf being seized on by the Mail and UKIP, although the facts of the case (if accurately reported) are pretty awful. I am no defender of France's many egregious and blatant breaches of EU law, but then don't kippers constantly moan about Britain having been forced to obey those same laws?
    That case is the extreme, but I have been threatened with arrest myself for the same thing. The practise (British instructors working according to their licenses) has been banned in France, Italy and regions of Austria and amounts to nothing more that protectionism.

    And yes, they do moan about it. But we follow the rules while moaning. Others don't.

    Which is why it's easier to go further afield.


    Which then, in turn, goes back to the original point. Why's Europe special? Why should we have the right to go work wherever, whenever? Or rather, why should we only have that right in Europe? What's wrong with having to go through a visa process which, in the grand scheme of things, is hardly arduous. It's filling out a few forms. You do more box ticking to go on holiday.
    • Political Ambassador
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    And just because they voted Leave doesn't mean that this will influence which MP they vote for when the world has moved on over the next three years.

    Areas which strongly supported capital punishment elected abolitionist MPs for decades before public opinion moved decisively against capital punishment.
    And if they aren't waiting 3 years and there is an early election? Improbable, but CCHQ is already starting to enter general election mode rather than flurry of by election mode.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    And if they aren't waiting 3 years and there is an early election? Improbable, but CCHQ is already starting to enter general election mode rather than flurry of by election mode.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I can't see May having an early general election unless the Lords wreck the Brexit bill or she wants a public mandate for a final Brexit deal.

    The latter is more likely than the former particularly if UKIP aren't dead and buried by then and they simply peddle the line that whatever she achieves they would have done better.

    There is a long history of the public punishing PMs who call unnecessary elections.

    There is also the risk of Corbyn quitting when the election is called and Labour uniting round a single figure for a short election campaign. She doesn't really want to be facing David Milliband acting as though he is the risen Christ.
    • Political Ambassador
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    I can't see May having an early general election unless the Lords wreck the Brexit bill or she wants a public mandate for a final Brexit deal.

    The latter is more likely than the former particularly if UKIP aren't dead and buried by then and they simply peddle the line that whatever she achieves they would have done better.

    There is a long history of the public punishing PMs who call unnecessary elections.

    There is also the risk of Corbyn quitting when the election is called and Labour uniting round a single figure for a short election campaign. She doesn't really want to be facing David Milliband acting as though he is the risen Christ.
    The Lords won't make the that mistake, she will make the same threat Lloyd-George did.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    The Lords won't make the that mistake, she will make the same threat Lloyd-George did.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    It was Asquith but he had to have two elections, one on Lloyd George's budget and one on the Parliament Bill to "earn" the royal commitment to create peers and the electorate punished him on both occasions. That led to the Home Rule Crisis, the need for a coalition in WWI, the Liberal split and the rise of the Labour Party.

    A PM appears not to have the constitutional right to demand the creation of peers without going to the countryand noticeably no threat to create peers has been made to intimidate the Lloyds since 1911. The threat has always been to use the Parliament Acts.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by karl pilkington)
    It's not really a peasant mentality but if you asked the average person about the future of this country and our global influence or about the customs union, the schengen area etc they wouldn't have a clue.
    Thats not how democracy works, fortunately.

    Believing that an elite are better qualified than the ordinary people to steer the course of the country is a peasant mentality on steroids.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Drewski)
    That case is the extreme, but I have been threatened with arrest myself for the same thing. The practise (British instructors working according to their licenses) has been banned in France, Italy and regions of Austria and amounts to nothing more that protectionism.

    And yes, they do moan about it. But we follow the rules while moaning. Others don't.

    Which is why it's easier to go further afield.


    Which then, in turn, goes back to the original point. Why's Europe special? Why should we have the right to go work wherever, whenever? Or rather, why should we only have that right in Europe? What's wrong with having to go through a visa process which, in the grand scheme of things, is hardly arduous. It's filling out a few forms. You do more box ticking to go on holiday.
    I suspect that the French and Italians will replace their obduracy in matters surrounding working in the country with absurdly complex visa processes, if nothing else, just to add to our woes after Brexit.

    I'm not clear though, are you saying that people don't want to work in Europe? Vast numbers can and do. However, even if it's one sided and most want to come to the UK rather than the reverse, that hasn't been shown to be a bad thing for our economy, other than amongst the racists kippers.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by joe cooley)
    Thats not how democracy works, fortunately.

    Believing that an elite are better qualified than the ordinary people to steer the course of the country is a peasant mentality on steroids.
    It is how democracy works we live in a representative democracy not a direct democracy didn't vote on the Iraq war on on most government policy
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    I'm not clear though, are you saying that people don't want to work in Europe? Vast numbers can and do. However, even if it's one sided and most want to come to the UK rather than the reverse, that hasn't been shown to be a bad thing for our economy, other than amongst the racists kippers.
    I'm not saying they don't, I'm just asking why they should get special treatment over someone from, say, the US, Canada, Australia, NZ, etc. And why we deserve special treatment to go there.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by karl pilkington)
    It is how democracy works we live in a representative democracy not a direct democracy didn't vote on the Iraq war on on most government policy
    The referendum was direct democracy, while not being binding the commons followed the will of the people.

    If you yearn to be governed by an elite move to the EU, while you can.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    I still can't believe it took the private initiative of a citizen to enforce constitutional rules on a matter of such magnitude, hadn't it been for that and nobody would have batted an eyelid. Not one institution flagged up that, er... actually, it says in the book it must be done. Even the judges that ended up ruling that it must, where were they before Gina Miller stepped up? To cap it all, the government appeal against it and lose. Nuts.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
    Useful resources
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.