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Edexcel Mathematics: Core C1 6663 17th May 2017 [Exam Discussion] Watch

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    anyone got qs they are stuck on ?
    say it here or the qs number and what year?
    happy to help
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    (Original post by student004)
    I did this mock paper and i got like 57
    anyone else wanna try it and tell me because i feel like its wayyy harder than usual. usually I get around 67-72.
    http://onmaths.com/mock_exams/edexce...17-prediction/
    I just did it too and just found that you don't get marks for workings so lowers your score if you make one mistake
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    for the previous question the last term is given when you sub in 6, i.e. to get 18 Then must you use the Sn rule to get 6/2(a+L) = 3(-2+18) = 48 as your answer NOT 18?
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    Did an online past paper.

    Keeping getting this wrong:

    1. You intergrate an f'(x) to get f(x). They give you a set of coordinates to get C.

    2. They then give you the equation to the normal - i.e 6y + x = 0. Then they tell you to find the coordinate of T.

    I have been trying to do it where I get the gradient of -1/6 of the normal and make it equal to the differentiated formula to try and solve for x. This didnt work.

    I then tried to make the intergrated formula equal y which is -1/6x , rearrange, then differentiate and try to factorise. No luck.

    Do I need to make -1/6 equal 6? Then what??
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    (Original post by siobhanx13)
    I just did it too and just found that you don't get marks for workings so lowers your score if you make one mistake
    okay I'm acc less worried now
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    surely the sum of question is not 18!

    You sub in 6 to get the last term (18) and follow through with Sn= n/2 (a+L)


    with a given as subbing in 1 into the expression

    Anyone confirm?
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    (Original post by student004)
    okay I'm acc less worried now
    I simplified an answer and I got it wrong
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    (Original post by wantodothebest)
    Did an online past paper.

    Keeping getting this wrong:

    1. You intergrate an f'(x) to get f(x). They give you a set of coordinates to get C.

    2. They then give you the equation to the normal - i.e 6y + x = 0. Then they tell you to find the coordinate of T.

    I have been trying to do it where I get the gradient of -1/6 of the normal and make it equal to the differentiated formula to try and solve for x. This didnt work.

    I then tried to make the intergrated formula equal y which is -1/6x , rearrange, then differentiate and try to factorise. No luck.

    Do I need to make -1/6 equal 6? Then what??
    I'm actually tearing up rn
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    (Original post by KimJongIan)
    surely the sum of question is not 18!

    You sub in 6 to get the last term (18) and follow through with Sn= n/2 (a+L)


    with a given as subbing in 1 into the expression

    Anyone confirm?
    Let me clarify
    It is not an arithmetic sequence so cant use that formula.
    U1 = -2
    U2 = -2
    U3 = 0
    U4 = 4
    U5 = 10
    U6 = 18
    So sum is 28
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    so it is not c1 but c2?
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    (Original post by wantodothebest)
    Did an online past paper.

    Keeping getting this wrong:

    1. You intergrate an f'(x) to get f(x). They give you a set of coordinates to get C.

    2. They then give you the equation to the normal - i.e 6y + x = 0. Then they tell you to find the coordinate of T.

    I have been trying to do it where I get the gradient of -1/6 of the normal and make it equal to the differentiated formula to try and solve for x. This didnt work.

    I then tried to make the intergrated formula equal y which is -1/6x , rearrange, then differentiate and try to factorise. No luck.

    Do I need to make -1/6 equal 6? Then what??
    Send a link to the question and I'll help.
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    (Original post by boaconstricta)
    Send a link to the question and I'll help.

    http://onmaths.com/mock_exams/edexce...17-prediction/
    there is usually variation in the questions but the same thing basically comes up every time, usually q9-11 (I think 10) so you can just skip through until you see an intergrating one with a part C about normals
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    Guys how do u do asymptote questions 🙇🏾🙇🏾🙇🏾
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    (Original post by KimJongIan)
    so it is not c1 but c2?
    It is C1 I'm afraid.
    On C1 there are 3 types of sequence questions
    Either arithmetic sequence
    OR Recurrence relations
    OR a question involving sigma which may also be one of the above topics (or in this case not)
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    (Original post by TinoTeex)
    Guys how do u do asymptote questions 🙇🏾🙇🏾🙇🏾
    I can explain it but give me a question ....

    for eg
    (5) (b) Write down the equations of the asymptotes of the curve C.
    you will write what x=....?
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    (Original post by Shadowfire123)
    (5) (b) Write down the equations of the asymptotes of the curve C.
    you will write what x=....?
    Does it always have to be "x=..."?

    Then again, I don't know whether they would give you any horizontal ones to consider...

    (Original post by TinoTeex)
    Guys how do u do asymptote questions 🙇🏾🙇🏾🙇🏾
    What about them? If you mean finding them, then simply look for values where the function doesn't exist.
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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    Does it always have to be "x=..."?

    Then again, I don't know whether they would give you any horizontal ones to consider...



    What about them? If you mean finding them, then simply look for values where the function doesn't exist.
    I mean the curve didnt print of this page - it was y = x /2 graph from a gold paper - but it can be horizontal and vertical
    asymptote questions
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    I really need help, I am panicking quite a bit. If a question asks me to find the x coordinate of the normal to a curve whose equation I just intergrated... what do I do???

    I thought I made the differentiated equation equal to the gradient of the normal anf factorise?? See question 10 on the
    http://onmaths.com/mock_exams/edexce...17-prediction/)
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    (Original post by wantodothebest)
    I really need help, I am panicking quite a bit. If a question asks me to find the x coordinate of the normal to a curve whose equation I just intergrated... what do I do???

    I thought I made the differentiated equation equal to the gradient of the normal anf factorise?? See question 10 on the
    http://onmaths.com/mock_exams/edexce...17-prediction/)
    cant login to question
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    (Original post by wantodothebest)
    I really need help, I am panicking quite a bit. If a question asks me to find the x coordinate of the normal to a curve whose equation I just intergrated... what do I do???

    I thought I made the differentiated equation equal to the gradient of the normal anf factorise?? See question 10 on the
    http://onmaths.com/mock_exams/edexce...17-prediction/)
    Yes, that is what you do. I also got the online question wrong doing that method. I then tried two identical questions from real past papers and got the right answer using the same method.
 
 
 
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