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    We're starting the Language Investigation and I have no idea where to start. My creative writing piece was awful so I really need to get a good mark if I'm to have any chance of getting an A.

    I'm looking at a Trump vs Obama topic. I'm thinking along the lines of debates so the speeches are less planned. I was looking for sources where they cover the same sorts of topics to compare how they represent issues such as immigration/education etc.

    Does anyone have any revolutionary tips for this investigation or any new ideas that I could steal?😊
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    Sorry you've not had any responses about this. Are you sure you've posted in the right place? Here's a link to our subject forum which should help get you more responses if you post there.


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    There is quite a well known analysis of Trump's language use during an interview. Someone has written their response to it here: http://worldofwonder.net/donald-trum...stic-analysis/

    Maybe compare their performances during TV interviews? The candidate debates are very rehearsed so you may get more spontaneous language use from interviews. If you want written transcripts however, you are more likely to find material from their speeches. How about looking at the respective acceptance or inauguration speeches?
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    (Original post by Lit teacher)
    There is quite a well known analysis of Trump's language use during an interview. Someone has written their response to it here: http://worldofwonder.net/donald-trum...stic-analysis/

    Maybe compare their performances during TV interviews? The candidate debates are very rehearsed so you may get more spontaneous language use from interviews. If you want written transcripts however, you are more likely to find material from their speeches. How about looking at the respective acceptance or inauguration speeches?
    Facing an existential crisis about this coursework, I started again. I'm going for differences in male and female politicians language use. I'm focusing on the responses to the recent speech from Boris Johnson about Trump's travel ban. The responses, I imagine, are spontaneous in nature as it's impossible to plan a response to a speech you haven't heard.

    I've found some interesting things so far. I'm tending to see that there are more similarities between the language of men and women than differences. My supervisor currently thinks that this is good because too much of the research focuses on the differences and therefore is highly skewed.

    How does this sound to you?
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    (Original post by SpencerHowe)
    Facing an existential crisis about this coursework, I started again. I'm going for differences in male and female politicians language use. I'm focusing on the responses to the recent speech from Boris Johnson about Trump's travel ban. The responses, I imagine, are spontaneous in nature as it's impossible to plan a response to a speech you haven't heard.

    I've found some interesting things so far. I'm tending to see that there are more similarities between the language of men and women than differences. My supervisor currently thinks that this is good because too much of the research focuses on the differences and therefore is highly skewed.

    How does this sound to you?
    Sounds like an interesting topic. My main concern would be the number of variables in the data. Are the differences due to gender, social class, age or political point of view? If you can access enough data it should be possible to identify patterns. Are you using Hansard? This would provide ready access to a range of different speakers, although it does not contain the level of linguistic detail that would come from your own transcription.
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    (Original post by Lit teacher)
    Sounds like an interesting topic. My main concern would be the number of variables in the data. Are the differences due to gender, social class, age or political point of view? If you can access enough data it should be possible to identify patterns. Are you using Hansard? This would provide ready access to a range of different speakers, although it does not contain the level of linguistic detail that would come from your own transcription.
    I wasn't aware Hansard was a thing! This resource has completely changed my investigation. I was dreading transcribing the entire thing and I've found the exact debate I'm starting with already done.
    Might I focus more on MP's from the same party? Should they have similar viewpoints?
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    (Original post by SpencerHowe)
    I wasn't aware Hansard was a thing! This resource has completely changed my investigation. I was dreading transcribing the entire thing and I've found the exact debate I'm starting with already done.
    Might I focus more on MP's from the same party? Should they have similar viewpoints?
    The opposition to Trump came from both the main parties. It would probably be best to look at the biggest variable between the MPs. I'm guessing that might be gender, which would also allow you to bring in different theorists. If you compare men and women speakers, try to find some of a similar age and background so that you know that it is probably the difference in sex which accounts for their difference in language.
    It might be interesting to compare pronoun use (how many times they use 'I' or 'we') and modal auxiliaries 'could', 'should' etc. You could also analyse language techniques such as rhetorical questions, repetition and emotive language to see whether male or female MPs use these the most effectively.
    Context is important in the mark scheme, and there should be plenty to say about the rules and conventions of parliament, which control how MPs debate. The audience is also interesting, as they speak to each other but have one eye on the TV audience.
 
 
 
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