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University of Oxford, Pawel-Sytniewski
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Oxford Graduate Application 2012/13

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Reply 3440
Original post by ExeterHistStudent
*Prospective 2013 applicant*

What sort of grades were humanities people with offers achieving for their second year in whole?

Should be expecting about 71% myself, but who knows!


It depends upon the Department/course you intend to apply for. Also, the academic requirements are not always rigid. Excellence in one regard may make up for a bit of slack in others.

For my department (History), the ordinary offer is 67% or better. However this can be raised or lowered at the Department's discretion, other factors being taken into account.
University of Oxford, Pawel-Sytniewski
University of Oxford
Oxford
Original post by Noldorin
You're almost definitely in the pool, I'm afraid to say...

I suggest you check up with your department though. They will know where your college app is currently at, and can inform you. :-)



Ah, yes I agree, I think I am too. I hope I get a nice place.

They did say on my studentship letter that they reserve the right to change my college if need be ... I wonder if that has something to do with the delay ... maybe if they are paying, they will select a cheap college, if college prices, rent etc vary quite a bit. I will wait it out another few days and then email my departmenet
Just got an offer from St. Peter's. Anyone else with St.Peter's?
Original post by HLS
It depends upon the Department/course you intend to apply for. Also, the academic requirements are not always rigid. Excellence in one regard may make up for a bit of slack in others.

For my department (History), the ordinary offer is 67% or better. However this can be raised or lowered at the Department's discretion, other factors being taken into account.


Thanks. 67% seems improbable to me in realistic terms - i.e I envisaged most candidates to be holding/seriously expecting firsts in order to be competitive.

Although of course I might be wrong. As other indicators are indeed important

Edit- i'm seeing neg(ativism)

The post wasn't doubting the existence of 67% percent offers, rather, asking what people were achieving in their penultimate year in order to be -given- an offer of 67%.
(edited 11 years ago)
Original post by ExeterHistStudent
Thanks. 67% seems improbable to me in realistic terms - i.e I envisaged most candidates to be holding/seriously expecting firsts in order to be competitive.

Although of course I might be wrong. As other indicators are indeed important

Edit- i'm seeing neg(ativism)

The post wasn't doubting the existence of 67% percent offers, rather, asking what people were achieving in their penultimate year in order to be -given- an offer of 67%.


Something to take into account is that people applying from Oxford for humanities subjects will only have their marks from prelims/mods, and nothing at all from second year, if they apply pre-finals. This can actually be a bit of a disadvantage, in my opinion: I'm glad I waited and applied after finals. My mods marks were good, but they just don't have the weight of finals results - for one thing, mods aren't double-marked routinely (or weren't when I took them, anyway). My point, really, is that what people applying in third year can offer in terms of anecdotal experience will differ hugely. If I had applied at that stage, I suppose my tutors could have indicated in the references the sort of marks I was getting for tutorial work - although only one of my three tutors routinely gave numerical marks - but those don't automatically reflect how one will do in finals.

I agree that probably most candidates would need to be heading for a first - even a high first - to be competitive, especially for funding, but the best way to determine whether that's so could certainly be from indicators other than firm second-year marks. :smile:

(It wasn't me who negged you, by the way - I am replying to discuss, not to disagree!)
Original post by thatfineframe
Something to take into account is that people applying from Oxford for humanities subjects will only have their marks from prelims/mods, and nothing at all from second year, if they apply pre-finals. This can actually be a bit of a disadvantage, in my opinion: I'm glad I waited and applied after finals. My mods marks were good, but they just don't have the weight of finals results - for one thing, mods aren't double-marked routinely (or weren't when I took them, anyway). My point, really, is that what people applying in third year can offer in terms of anecdotal experience will differ hugely. If I had applied at that stage, I suppose my tutors could have indicated in the references the sort of marks I was getting for tutorial work - although only one of my three tutors routinely gave numerical marks - but those don't automatically reflect how one will do in finals.

I agree that probably most candidates would need to be heading for a first - even a high first - to be competitive, especially for funding, but the best way to determine whether that's so could certainly be from indicators other than firm second-year marks. :smile:

(It wasn't me who negged you, by the way - I am replying to discuss, not to disagree!)



Thanks! :smile:
Original post by thatfineframe
Something to take into account is that people applying from Oxford for humanities subjects will only have their marks from prelims/mods, and nothing at all from second year, if they apply pre-finals. This can actually be a bit of a disadvantage, in my opinion: I'm glad I waited and applied after finals. My mods marks were good, but they just don't have the weight of finals results - for one thing, mods aren't double-marked routinely (or weren't when I took them, anyway). My point, really, is that what people applying in third year can offer in terms of anecdotal experience will differ hugely. If I had applied at that stage, I suppose my tutors could have indicated in the references the sort of marks I was getting for tutorial work - although only one of my three tutors routinely gave numerical marks - but those don't automatically reflect how one will do in finals.

I agree that probably most candidates would need to be heading for a first - even a high first - to be competitive, especially for funding, but the best way to determine whether that's so could certainly be from indicators other than firm second-year marks. :smile:

(It wasn't me who negged you, by the way - I am replying to discuss, not to disagree!)


What would you consider desirable in terms of other indicators?

Sorry for all these questions, but there is no better source than people on here :tongue:
Original post by ExeterHistStudent
What would you consider desirable in terms of other indicators?

Sorry for all these questions, but there is no better source than people on here :tongue:


I am no expert, but probably the written work and references. It should be clear in the applicant's writing (I'd imagine) if they are hitting a strong first-class level, and the tutors are of course very well-qualified to comment on things like ability relative to the wider cohort. :smile:
Reply 3448
Original post by ExeterHistStudent
Thanks. 67% seems improbable to me in realistic terms - i.e I envisaged most candidates to be holding/seriously expecting firsts in order to be competitive.

Although of course I might be wrong. As other indicators are indeed important

Edit- i'm seeing neg(ativism)

The post wasn't doubting the existence of 67% percent offers, rather, asking what people were achieving in their penultimate year in order to be -given- an offer of 67%.


My offer letter asks for 67%. I am in my final two weeks of study. At the time of applying I was averaging ~78%. Since then I am averaging a little more than this. However the exams will inevitably bring that average down.

I would not read too much into the 'percentages' - this is why the offer is potentially flexible rather than invariably rigid. University to University, tutor to tutor the same quality work is likely to receive substantially different grades.

You should really see the application for what it is - something where every element is crucial. A high 2:1 or better is usually (but not always) essential for consideration. The samples of written work, references and statement of purpose and/or research proposal are often the deciders. The availability of suitable supervision is also something not to be underestimated. I know some superb candidates rejected from Oxford for a lack of this (and subsequently accepted at Cambridge).

If you are currently scoring greater than 67 then it is probably safe to assume, providing your final grade is at least this level, you have sufficiently good grades to secure a place.

Try and get the best references available to you, submit your best written work, and make sure you pay special attention to your statement of purpose. To put it into perspective, I think I spent several months researching for and refining my SoP/Research Proposal.

Also keep in mind the expertise in the Department and the availability of appropriate supervision. I know the History website advises you not to try to recruit your own supervisor but if there is somebody in particularly you really want I would still recommend contacting them.
(edited 11 years ago)
If you haven't graduated yet, will they wait for you to graduate before a college accepts you?
Or is it possible to be admited by a college while you still have a conditional offer?
Original post by HLS
My offer letter asks for 67%. I am in my final two weeks of study. At the time of applying I was averaging ~78%. Since then I am averaging a little more than this. However the exams will inevitably bring that average down.

I would not read too much into the 'percentages' - this is why the offer is potentially flexible rather than invariably rigid. University to University, tutor to tutor the same quality work is likely to receive substantially different grades.

You should really see the application for what it is - something where every element is crucial. A high 2:1 or better is usually (but not always) essential for consideration. The samples of written work, references and statement of purpose and/or research proposal are often the deciders. The availability of suitable supervision is also something not to be underestimated. I know some superb candidates rejected from Oxford for a lack of this (and subsequently accepted at Cambridge).

If you are currently scoring greater than 67 then it is probably safe to assume, providing your final grade is at least this level, you have sufficiently good grades to secure a place.

Try and get the best references available to you, submit your best written work, and make sure you pay special attention to your statement of purpose. To put it into perspective, I think I spent several months researching for and refining my SoP/Research Proposal.

Also keep in mind the expertise in the Department and the availability of appropriate supervision. I know the History website advises you not to try to recruit your own supervisor but if there is somebody in particularly you really want I would still recommend contacting them.


What are you studying, if I may ask?
Original post by Spairos
If you haven't graduated yet, will they wait for you to graduate before a college accepts you?
Or is it possible to be admited by a college while you still have a conditional offer?


you don't have to graduate to get a college, no.
Original post by *Corinna*
you don't have to graduate to get a college, no.


4-8 weeks since the date they unoficially inform you that you got accepted or 4-8 weeks since the date they clarified the official conditions untill you get admited by a college? (Linacre :P)
Original post by Spairos
4-8 weeks since the date they unoficially inform you that you got accepted or 4-8 weeks since the date they clarified the official conditions untill you get admited by a college? (Linacre :P)


well you did have an open application so it might take a bit longer. Maybe the colleges are fighting over you and it takes them longer to decide who wins you :tongue:
Original post by *Corinna*
well you did have an open application so it might take a bit longer. Maybe the colleges are fighting over you and it takes them longer to decide who wins you :tongue:


I hope Linacre isnt full yet :P

3 weeks have passed so far (since the day I received the unofficial offer) so I guess there is still plenty of time ahead of me.
Original post by Spairos
I hope Linacre isnt full yet :P

3 weeks have passed so far (since the day I received the unofficial offer) so I guess there is still plenty of time ahead of me.


maybe you can take the place I'll give up at Christ Church
Original post by *Corinna*
maybe you can take the place I'll give up at Christ Church


Maybe the specific same place.. who knows... :P

Nah Linacre calls me..
Original post by *Corinna*
maybe you can take the place I'll give up at Christ Church


Did you decide where you were going next year? :smile:
Original post by HLS
My offer letter asks for 67%. I am in my final two weeks of study. At the time of applying I was averaging ~78%. Since then I am averaging a little more than this. However the exams will inevitably bring that average down.

I would not read too much into the 'percentages' - this is why the offer is potentially flexible rather than invariably rigid. University to University, tutor to tutor the same quality work is likely to receive substantially different grades.

You should really see the application for what it is - something where every element is crucial. A high 2:1 or better is usually (but not always) essential for consideration. The samples of written work, references and statement of purpose and/or research proposal are often the deciders. The availability of suitable supervision is also something not to be underestimated. I know some superb candidates rejected from Oxford for a lack of this (and subsequently accepted at Cambridge).

If you are currently scoring greater than 67 then it is probably safe to assume, providing your final grade is at least this level, you have sufficiently good grades to secure a place.

Try and get the best references available to you, submit your best written work, and make sure you pay special attention to your statement of purpose. To put it into perspective, I think I spent several months researching for and refining my SoP/Research Proposal.

Also keep in mind the expertise in the Department and the availability of appropriate supervision. I know the History website advises you not to try to recruit your own supervisor but if there is somebody in particularly you really want I would still recommend contacting them.


Thanks a lot for this! It is all very helpful.

78% is very impressive for history as an average.
Reply 3459
Original post by *Corinna*
What are you studying, if I may ask?


History.

Original post by ExeterHistStudent
Thanks a lot for this! It is all very helpful.

78% is very impressive for history as an average.


I am terrible at exams, so as I say that number will drop after my finals. I am fairly confident of getting the minimum 67% required though.

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