Can I do teacher training with really BAD a levels? Watch

username2340301
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Hi,

My Alevels are awful at CEE. (D and E being in Biology and Chemistry).
I want to do teacher training to become a science teacher.

I am currently at uni, one very lowly ranked hence why I got in so easily. (Entry requirements through clearing where literally two E's). I am on track to gain hopefully a 2:2, potentially 2:1 if im exceptionally lucky.

I want to do a route that is schools direct or SCITT based. Everywhere I looked mentioned a degree class of at least 2:2 and GCSES C above in Maths and English. (I have A's in all my GCSES except 2 - Art and French which were B and C)

I just didnt enjoy Alevels compared to GCSES and this reflected on my grades. Do I have a chance to gain a ITT spot? And if so, at interview, if they ask why my Alevels are poor, what would I say? If I told them "I didnt like the way A levels were structured and I had a bad 2 years" it may show im not adaptable and I dont want that.
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username2340301
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* E and E in Biology and Chemistry
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liebkuchen
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It's very possible but you'll be disadvantaged in applying for more popular training routes/courses.

Work hard to get the best degree you can but don't forget the other aspects of your application. What work experience have you got? Are you volunteering weekly in a school? Can you demonstrate team work via uni society positions?

Prepare yourself that you might not get in first time around. It doesn't mean you shouldn't teach, just that in a particular year there are 'better' candidates.
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cjohn16
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Which science do you want to specialise up to A level?
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beautifulbigmacs
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Something that helped me choose which teaching route was best for me was to look at past A level papers and weigh up whether I felt I could answer them well and pass that knowledge onto other people with confidence.

Do this with some science past papers and see how you get on. This will help you to make a decision. You could always do a masters in a different subject if you feel you could teach that better. This is what I have done.
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pgce113
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I had mediocre GCSEs mostly b and cs, rubbish Alevels (well I did the IB - 26 points). But then I did a foundation year as I couldn't get into my uni of choice otherwise and got AAAA. I then got a 2:1 from a top 10 uni.

I needed an Alevel in German for my PGCE which I got the equivalent of an D and no degree after and they still let me in no questions asked.

As far as I know your Alevel results are irrelevant. You just need GCSE in English and maths above a C.

Having a 2:1 on your degree would be very advantageous though, especially when it comes to your bursary.


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username2340301
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(Original post by cjohn16)
Which science do you want to specialise up to A level?
Biology!
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FOODFORTHOUGHT96
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(Original post by username2340301)
Biology!
Did you manage to get in to the PGCE course?
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ByEeek
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(Original post by username2340301)
Hi,

My Alevels are awful at CEE. (D and E being in Biology and Chemistry).
I want to do teacher training to become a science teacher.

I am currently at uni, one very lowly ranked hence why I got in so easily. (Entry requirements through clearing where literally two E's). I am on track to gain hopefully a 2:2, potentially 2:1 if im exceptionally lucky.

I want to do a route that is schools direct or SCITT based. Everywhere I looked mentioned a degree class of at least 2:2 and GCSES C above in Maths and English. (I have A's in all my GCSES except 2 - Art and French which were B and C)

I just didnt enjoy Alevels compared to GCSES and this reflected on my grades. Do I have a chance to gain a ITT spot? And if so, at interview, if they ask why my Alevels are poor, what would I say? If I told them "I didnt like the way A levels were structured and I had a bad 2 years" it may show im not adaptable and I dont want that.
With all the respect in the world, how would you be able to draw on your own experience at school and motivate, coach and inspire students to get the top grades?

I don't have a huge set of results at school but career changed into teaching and my education, knowlegde and attitude is a royal mile away from where I was at school. Personally, I would advise you to go into the world and gain some life experience before you attempt teacher training. I think it might be the end of you.

Good luck!
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Dalightfool
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As you may be aware, teaching is suffering somewhat of a recruitment and retention crisis at the moment. Science is a shortage subject, I believe, although Biology less so than Chemistry and Physics. I think you stand a reasonable chance, so long as you can meet the relevant tick boxes (a relevant undergraduate degree, experience in a secondary school, clean DBS, references, etc.). Someone got onto my PGCE course with a 3rd during clearing, so ITT providers can get quite desperate towards the end of the application cycle. That may be your avenue in.

Ideally you want to show how you've made lots of progress (academically, spiritually, socially, etc.) since your A Levels. Obtaining a 2:1 would be great, but even a 2:2 shows significant progress from where you were at the end of your A Levels.

Teacher training isn't easy, and people often feel like the workload is unreasonable for the amount of pay and appreciation they receive. You really have to want to teach, for it to work out. Many capable people have dropped out of my PGCE course due to feeling that it all wasn't worth it. You want to avoid that, so be sure before you apply. The bursaries are tempting, but not enough on their own to motivate you through the course. You need real passion to get up and give it your all every day. So, it could be helpful to have a year out and get some work experience, just to be sure.
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