Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

How much savings do you have? Watch

    • Section Leader
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MrMarket)
    Buy these shares, these are highly liquid defensive stocks. We would need a nuclear war to derail these giants....

    1) Reckitt Benckiser
    2) Diageo
    3) Unilever
    4) Johnson and Johnson
    5) Procter and Gamble
    6) British American Tobacco
    7) Altria Group

    Split the money equally seven ways. Reinvest dividends. Don't look back.
    I appreciate the advice, but I m not a risk taker and I m not giving anything to the companies who contributed to the people's money I inheriteds deaths
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ChickenMadness)
    Did have £6k but it's all going down the drain this year lol.
    ikr :\
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Reue)
    I have a couple of online income streams but I wouldnt consider it a company.
    :beard: Hmm. Some of the richest people in the world do that! So what do you do, like membership programs, or consultations?..
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by claireestelle)
    I appreciate the advice, but I m not a risk taker and I m not giving anything to the companies who contributed to the people's money I inheriteds deaths
    It is the secondary market, so it doesn't really benefit the tobacco companies, but fair enough. Some of the best returns in the world are in tobacco, especially Brtish American Tobacco since they bought out Reynolds American a month or so ago.

    These aren't major risks, we have to dive into the FTSE 250 and the FTSE AIM to see the real casino. I would never recommend those places for safe investing, there is substantial risk of capital in the FTSE AIM.

    My background is finance and I'm a PhD student in finance so I'm used to stock picking and watching the market. I understand most people can't and simply don't care. So your best option is to either do what I said with those defensive stocks, find a good fund or venture into the corporate bond market. Again you will need to teach yourself.

    It's a bit like me going into a chemistry lab and mixing random stuff and not expecting something to go wrong.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yudothis)
    Already 6% in 2017? Too bad you don't have more to invest.
    I have £29,000 in shares, mostly in stocks which I pick. I'll list some from the top of my head....

    Apple, BP, Starbucks, Berkley Group Holdings, Galiford Try, H&M, Legal and General, Reckitt Benckiser, Paragon Group of Companies, Greggs, Kotak India Mid Cap Fund, HL Select Shares Fund
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Reue)
    Jesus Christ. Stop.
    He is not wrong. Look at the share price history of some of those. Doubled over the last 10 years if not more.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    £1K will increase to £1.5K in may
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yudothis)
    He is not wrong. Look at the share price history of some of those. Doubled over the last 10 years if not more.
    Those stocks are good for the buy and hold defensive investor, this is not me. The only ones I want to own from those are Reckitt Benckiser and British American Tobacco.

    I am waiting on a good price for British American Tobacco to jump in. Reckitt I use as a portfolio balance, to lessen volatility. Reckitt works a bit like gold, when the markets panic, people jump to consumer defensives such as Reckitt.

    I am willing to take more risk, you can see I invest in India and the FTSE 250.
    I like dividends and consistent dividends, my portfolio has a lot of stocks like that. I like growing dividends as well, we can see that again with Paragon Group of Companies and Galliford Try.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MrMarket)
    I have £29,000 in shares, mostly in stocks which I pick. I'll list some from the top of my head....

    Apple, BP, Starbucks, Berkley Group Holdings, Galiford Try, H&M, Legal and General, Reckitt Benckiser, Paragon Group of Companies, Greggs, Kotak India Mid Cap Fund, HL Select Shares Fund
    it all seems pretty risky
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I'm 17
    I currently have about £200 in the bank, but when I'm 18 I'll have access to my other account with about £4000 in it (it's one of those baby bond accounts)

    It'll all be going towards uni and a car, though
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yudothis)
    He is not wrong. Look at the share price history of some of those. Doubled over the last 10 years if not more.
    Past results are not an indicator of future performance.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Reue nvm sorry if it was a dumb ques
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 0to100)
    it all seems pretty risky
    The only risky stuff is the India Fund and the companies in the FTSE 250 ( Galiford Try, Berkley Group Holdings, Greggs, Paragon Group of Companies). Even then it's not super risky, go into the FTSE AIM and you will see the real casino.

    It's good to venture out of the FTSE 100 and Dow 30 as a professional investor, you will learn a lot more and be able to make much better returns.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 0to100)
    "only"?
    Yes only. It's a poor amount considering the money i've been earning. If I didn't have to use big chunks of my savings & redundancy package to cover living costs during two periods of unemployment i'd probably be a homeowner by now.

    (Original post by Padfoot22)
    I'm 17
    I currently have about £200 in the bank, but when I'm 18 I'll have access to my other account with about £4000 in it (it's one of those baby bond accounts)

    It'll all be going towards uni and a car, though
    As someone who inherited a similar amount of money at that age and pissed all of it away, I cannot stress enough how important it is to use responsibly. Don't spend it unless you absolutely have to, or you'll regret it later.
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Reue)
    Past results are not an indicator of future performance.
    Indeed. But you have to ask yourself what all of those are, and why their market performance is solid and consistent over time. That's why he said split between those, and over time you will make a gain. There are huge value chains behind those conglomerates that produce goods we require. At the end of the day that is what stock price reflects, the ability of the company to make future profits. So yes, the disclaimer you quoted is true, but for an investor who is rather risk averse, diversifying with such a portfolio is not a bad idea. Certainly much better than most of the **** a broker might try to offer you.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sr90)
    Yes only. It's a poor amount considering the money i've been earning. If I didn't have to use big chunks of my savings & redundancy package to cover living costs during two periods of unemployment i'd probably be a homeowner by now.



    As someone who inherited a similar amount of money at that age and pissed all of it away, I cannot stress enough how important it is to use responsibly. Don't spend it unless you absolutely have to, or you'll regret it later.
    Yes, I think the majority of it will go towards rent costs for when I start uni in September, as my loan doesn't quite cover the rent. But I would also like to get a car with it
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yudothis)
    He is not wrong. Look at the share price history of some of those. Doubled over the last 10 years if not more.
    You'd expect an average stock to double over 10 years. It doesn't mean they are good picks.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yudothis)
    Indeed. But you have to ask yourself what all of those are, and why their market performance is solid and consistent over time. That's why he said split between those, and over time you will make a gain. There are huge value chains behind those conglomerates that produce goods we require. At the end of the day that is what stock price reflects, the ability of the company to make future profits. So yes, the disclaimer you quoted is true, but for an investor who is rather risk averse, diversifying with such a portfolio is not a bad idea. Certainly much better than most of the **** a broker might try to offer you.
    I can guarantee you those shares will outperform (with dividends reinvested) any damn bank account over the next 20 years.

    You will be super immune to market crashes as well, most of those defensive stocks were flat during 2008/2009 crash. They didn't tank with the market.

    Sure you won't get spectacular return, you shouldn't expect it either way, you are buying highly liquid defensives. You will outperform any bank account and any investment grade bond. Will you beat the market? Possibly. Will you underperform the market? I doubt it.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I have £40K in savings. An average amount.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sr90)
    If I didn't have to use big chunks of my savings to cover living costs during two periods of unemployment i'd probably be a homeowner by now.
    This is my life in a nutshell. And maybe for me not homeowner as I'm still earning module credits toward my degree and I'm currently on a gap year, so I wasn't earning salary but I was working. But definitely I would've been paying for my own flat at least. Or renting a nice affordable home outside London. But then I got kicked out and washed all my loans and savings away on rent and expenses and dues. Sigh Now I've got **** all to my name. You didnt ask for all this info but still looll
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
    Useful resources
    How much money do you spend a week?The ultimate guide to tax!Guide to student bank accounts

    Sponsored features:

    Web Legend

    Win a Macbook Air!

    Blog about setting up a website for a chance to win in our Web Legend competition.

    Quick link:

    Unanswered money and finance threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.