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    I am a foreign student preparing for UK exams in maths and am confused by number formats I should use.

    (1) In the US, my teacher sometimes considered my number 1 to be 7 as I used to write a diagonal line, which is not normally used in the US (see below). How are these digits, as well as 4, normally written in the UK?
    Name:  Digits2.JPG
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    (2) In my language, we never say 'and' in long numbers, which is opposite in English. If 1,234,567 is pronounced as 'one million, two hundred and thirty-four thousand, five hundred and sixty-seven' (i.e. 'and' is not used between units and thousands, thousands and millions, etc.), how to pronounce long numbers containing zeros correctly, e.g.:

    • 12,005 = twelve thousand (and?) five
    • 12,050 = twelve thousand (and?) fifty
    • 12,500 = twelve thousand (and?) five hundred.

    (3) Is it the correct notation for recurring decimals in the UK?

    1.22345634563456...=1.22\dot{3}4  5\dot{6}

    How is this number normally pronounced, 'one point two two (and?) three four five six repeating / repeated / recurring / recurred / into infinity'?
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    (Original post by Fortesque)
    I am a foreign student preparing for UK exams in maths and am confused by number formats I should use.

    (1) In the US, my teacher sometimes considered my number 1 to be 7 as I used to write a diagonal line, which is not normally used in the US (see below). How are these digits, as well as 4, normally written in the UK?
    Name:  Digits2.JPG
Views: 40
Size:  13.9 KB

    (2) In my language, we never say 'and' in long numbers, which is opposite in English. If 1,234,567 is pronounced as 'one million, two hundred and thirty-four thousand, five hundred and sixty-seven' (i.e. 'and' is not used between units and thousands, thousands and millions, etc.), how to pronounce long numbers containing zeros correctly, e.g.:

    • 12,005 = twelve thousand (and?) five
    • 12,050 = twelve thousand (and?) fifty
    • 12,500 = twelve thousand (and?) five hundred.


    (3) Is it the correct notation for recurring decimals in the UK?

    1.22345634563456...=1.22\dot{3}4  5\dot{6}

    How is this number normally pronounced, 'one point two two (and?) three four five six repeating / repeated / recurring / recurred / into infinity'?
    I have a polish friend who writes her ones just like you!! She's been told to be really careful in exams to make sure they don't look like sevens - either get into the habit of just drawing a vertical line or start adding a horizontal line on the bottom to make sure they know you mean a one and not a seven. If it helps, crossing your sevens may be another good way of distinguishing.

    There's nothing wrong with your number 4, you can definitely write them like that

    As for the "and" in numbers with zeros, your first two are correct and we would say "and" there. However "12,500" would just be said "twelve thousand, five hundred" - no "and" in that one. Not sure why though!!

    Yes, we definitely use recurring decimals here. And yup that notation is correct I have no idea how it would be pronounced since more than one digit repeats, but I have a feeling it'd be something along the lines of "one point two two three recurring four five six recurring" - just to show which numbers are repeated exactly.

    Hope I helped you, and good luck with your exams!
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    Thank you, NiamhM1801, for your answers!

    (Original post by NiamhM1801)
    I have a polish friend who writes her ones just like you!! She's been told to be really careful in exams to make sure they don't look like sevens - either get into the habit of just drawing a vertical line or start adding a horizontal line on the bottom to make sure they know you mean a one and not a seven. If it helps, crossing your sevens may be another good way of distinguishing.
    So if I understood you correctly,
    (1) 'one' and 'seven' are normally written in the UK as in the US: 'one' = a vertical line only, 'seven' = a horizontal and a diagonal lines;
    (2) writing 'seven' with an additional crossing line is also acceptable on maths exams.

    Is that correct?
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    Name:  1-0.png
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    That's how I write my numbers, hope that's of some help to you. (apologies, it's been done in paint with a mouse, but probably neater than my handwriting.)
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    (Original post by Fortesque)
    Thank you, NiamhM1801, for your answers!



    So if I understood you correctly,
    (1) 'one' and 'seven' are normally written in the UK as in the US: 'one' = a vertical line only, 'seven' = a horizontal and a diagonal lines;
    (2) writing 'seven' with an additional crossing line is also acceptable on maths exams.

    Is that correct?
    No problem! Yep, that's correct
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    Thanks to both of you! Then I will write 'one' as a vertical line and 'seven' with a crossing line so that even the strictest examiner understands them properly.

    Can anyone comment on pronouncing recurring decimals and using 'and' in long numbers?
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    (Original post by Fortesque)
    In my language, we never say 'and' in long numbers, which is opposite in English. If 1,234,567 is pronounced as 'one million, two hundred and thirty-four thousand, five hundred and sixty-seven' (i.e. 'and' is not used between units and thousands, thousands and millions, etc.), how to pronounce long numbers containing zeros correctly, e.g.:

    • 12,005 = twelve thousand (and?) five
    • 12,050 = twelve thousand (and?) fifty
    • 12,500 = twelve thousand (and?) five hundred.

    The British use "and" in those cases (edited to exclude " and five hundred"), but Americans miss it out.

    I write my sevens like Tubbz, above, to make sure it is not confused for a one, and use a similar cross on z, to distinguish it from a two, which is essentially copied from French usage.
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    (Original post by Fortesque)
    I am a foreign student preparing for UK exams in maths and am confused by number formats I should use.

    (1) In the US, my teacher sometimes considered my number 1 to be 7 as I used to write a diagonal line, which is not normally used in the US (see below). How are these digits, as well as 4, normally written in the UK?
    Name:  Digits2.JPG
Views: 40
Size:  13.9 KB

    (2) In my language, we never say 'and' in long numbers, which is opposite in English. If 1,234,567 is pronounced as 'one million, two hundred and thirty-four thousand, five hundred and sixty-seven' (i.e. 'and' is not used between units and thousands, thousands and millions, etc.), how to pronounce long numbers containing zeros correctly, e.g.:

    • 12,005 = twelve thousand (and?) five
    • 12,050 = twelve thousand (and?) fifty
    • 12,500 = twelve thousand (and?) five hundred.

    (3) Is it the correct notation for recurring decimals in the UK?

    1.22345634563456...=1.22\dot{3}4  5\dot{6}

    How is this number normally pronounced, 'one point two two (and?) three four five six repeating / repeated / recurring / recurred / into infinity'?

    • 12,005 = twelve thousand and five
    • 12,050 = twelve thousand and fifty
    • 12,500 = twelve thousand, five hundred. (for anything non-mathematical, twelve 'n' half thousand, but that's colloquial)

    Would be my pronunciation
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    Thank you all. I see that 'and' is used before the last number in every group of three digits except for the case when the last number represents hundreds, like in 12,500.

    Can someone advise on correct pronunciation of that recurring decimal?
 
 
 
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