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'Poshest' universities in the UK revealed Watch

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    (Original post by Underscore__)
    One of the was almost in shock when he met a trainee who went to Sussex.
    Of course they ask for your university, to collect stats about the process. The fact is they don't filter on it.

    And that speaks more about your friend than your firm.

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    Edit to add: by the way, which university did Clifford Chance's HR Director go to?

    A: Sussex.

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Of course they ask for your university, to collect stats about the process. The fact is they don't filter on it.

    And that speaks more about your friend than your firm.

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    Edit to add: by the way, which university did Clifford Chance's HR Director go to?

    A: Sussex.

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    Right so there's no CV blind applications, just CV blind interviews. Without evidence to the contrary it's only logical to assume it plays a role. It seems unlikely that by mere coincidence the best applications all came from RG alumni

    1. Congrats you found three lawyers in a firm of almost three thousand that went to Sussex.
    2. I at no point said that all solicitors at magic circle firms went to RG, I said most.
    3. The friend I was talking about is at Baker & Mckenzie so CC stats aren't really relevant. It doesn't speak more of him, you can search B&M's website by university, have a quick look and see how many lawyers went to Sussex (spoiler the answer is two, Baker have almost 5,000 attorneys).


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    (Original post by Underscore__)
    Right so there's no CV blind applications, just CV blind interviews. Without evidence to the contrary it's only logical to assume it plays a role. It seems unlikely that by mere coincidence the best applications all came from RG alumni

    1. Congrats you found three lawyers in a firm of almost three thousand that went to Sussex.
    2. I at no point said that all solicitors at magic circle firms went to RG, I said most.
    3. The friend I was talking about is at Baker & Mckenzie so CC stats aren't really relevant. It doesn't speak more of him, you can search B&M's website by university, have a quick look and see how many lawyers went to Sussex (spoiler the answer is two, Baker have almost 5,000 attorneys).
    They. Don't. Filter. On. University. Name. At. All. At. No. Stage.
    "CVs must be included with the submission, but they are “for our recording purposes only,” adds Aasha Mahadoo, Clifford Chance’s graduate recruitment advisor. They will only be considered — after a decision has been made on the applications — to confirm that the candidate is currently studying at a UK university (a requirement for the scheme), she continues."


    The screenshot only shows 3 - Linkedin actually has 13 CC employees from Sussex. (Including, as noted, the Head of HR...)
    https://www.linkedin.com/school/9521...ntCompany=3954

    And 9 at B&M:
    https://www.linkedin.com/school/9521...ntCompany=3957
    This compares with 96 from Oxford at B&M.

    At no point have I said there are more non-RGs at "top" law firms. The current changes in recruitment will take a few years to filter through, and of course there are good applicants at RGs so they aren't going to be turned away. The point, once again, is going to a non-RG doesn't prevent you from being succesful.

    More data: 38% of 2013 TCs at Eversheds were from non-RG universities, and 41% at Irwin Mitchell.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Are you a graduate currently in employment? Or, like me, an actual employer?
    Just out of interest, can you tell us vaguely what field you are an employer in?

    (Original post by Underscore__)
    It seems unlikely that by mere coincidence the best applications all came from RG alumni
    It's not coincidence though. They have higher entrance requirements and generally the first pick of students.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    Just out of interest, can you tell us vaguely what field you are an employer in?
    A multi-billion pound advertising & marketing company. I've hired or worked alongside excellent grads from, for example, Oxford and Bournemouth.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    38% of 2013 TCs at Eversheds were from non-RG universities, and 41% at Irwin Mitchell.
    Is this supposed to prove his point, or yours?
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    Is this supposed to prove his point, or yours?
    It shows there are plenty of non-RGers at leading law firms.

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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    Is this supposed to prove his point, or yours?
    It shows there are plenty of non-RGers at leading law firms.

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    They. Don't. Filter. On. University. Name. At. All. At. No. Stage.
    "CVs must be included with the submission, but they are “for our recording purposes only,” adds Aasha Mahadoo, Clifford Chance’s graduate recruitment advisor. They will only be considered — after a decision has been made on the applications — to confirm that the candidate is currently studying at a UK university (a requirement for the scheme), she continues."
    A law firm is really likely to come out and say 'we look at which university you went to so unless you're at a top end university don't bother'.

    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    The screenshot only shows 3 - Linkedin actually has 13 CC employees from Sussex. (Including, as noted, the Head of HR...)
    https://www.linkedin.com/school/9521...ntCompany=3954
    I'I not interested in how many employees there are, it's not relevant. I'm looking at the number of solicitors.

    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    And 9 at B&M:
    https://www.linkedin.com/school/9521...ntCompany=3957
    This compares with 96 from Oxford at B&M.
    There are two solicitors at Baker who went to Sussex, one ninth of the number of Oxford alumni.

    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    At no point have I said there are more non-RGs at "top" law firms. The current changes in recruitment will take a few years to filter through, and of course there are good applicants at RGs so they aren't going to be turned away. The point, once again, is going to a non-RG doesn't prevent you from being succesful.
    At no point have I said going to a non RG university prevents you from being successful even in law but you're a significant disadvantage.

    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    More data: 38% of 2013 TCs at Eversheds were from non-RG universities, and 41% at Irwin Mitchell.
    1. These are not leading law firms. Eversheds Sutherland will be bigger because of their merger but they aren't a leading firm
    2. 62% and 59% of all training contracts went to people from about a fifth of all universities, I don't see how you can argue this supports your position.


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    (Original post by Underscore__)
    A law firm is really likely to come out and say 'we look at which university you went to so unless you're at a top end university don't bother'.
    So you don't believe a law firm's statement about their recruitment processes. Maybe you should sue them.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    So you don't believe a law firm's statement about their recruitment processes. Maybe you should sue them.
    1. I don't really have any reason to
    2. Off of the top of my head I can't really think of any action you could bring for that
    3. Even if there is, I'd find it all but impossible to show loss


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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    It shows there are plenty of non-RGers at leading law firms.

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    You literally chose two of the least respected firms in the City to prove your point. Saying that there are "plenty of non-RGers" there is probably more reflective of their lower standards or the failure of non-RGers to get into better firms than anything else. But sure, if being a trainee slave at the Shed if your life goal, that's great.

    Spoiler:
    Show

    'RG' is too broad a term, particularly for law, when you have unis like QMUL, Liverpool or Sheffield masquerading their Law departments as 'RG'.
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    You literally chose two of the least respected firms in the City to prove your point. Saying that there are "plenty of non-RGers" there is probably more reflective of their lower standards or the failure of non-RGers to get into better firms than anything else. But sure, if being a trainee slave at the Shed if your life goal, that's great.

    Spoiler:
    Show


    'RG' is too broad a term, particularly for law, when you have unis like QMUL, Liverpool or Sheffield masquerading their Law departments as 'RG'.

    So not only are you elitist about universities, you are also elitist about city law firms. Great. At this point I'll leave you budding lawyers to it.

    Enjoy.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    So not only are you elitist about universities, you are also elitist about city law firms. Great. At this point I'll leave you budding lawyers to it.

    Enjoy.
    I think that you may need to prove why being 'elitist' is a bad thing in a profession as competitive and intellectually demanding as law.

    (I also have no idea as to why this discussion started in a thread about 'posh' universities, but oh well)
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    A multi-billion pound advertising & marketing company.
    I wasn't questioning the authority of your statements, I was just interested for context. Sector can obviously make a difference here.

    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    So not only are you elitist about universities, you are also elitist about city law firms. Great. At this point I'll leave you budding lawyers to it.

    Enjoy.
    You did specifically make a claim about 'leading law firms', though. I find it kind of strange to describe Irwin Mitchell as a City firm at all, given it's largely known for PI work.

    (Original post by Underscore__)
    At no point have I said going to a non RG university prevents you from being successful even in law but you're a significant disadvantage.
    It's not inconceivable that you might sometimes find it a little harder to get a foot in the door. This is particularly so with firms with a more academic bent (and probably the Bar, in general). It's unlikely to make a big difference after that.

    If you went to Lancaster (non-RG) and you outperform someone who went to Manchester (RG) at a firm's assessment day, all else being equal, they're probably going to go for you over him. In fact this is probably true all else not being equal, too -- they run assessments for a reason.

    As noted above, the main reason for some universities' overrepresentation is that they have higher entrance requirements and get an earlier pick of the students than others.

    Most people who got top A levels and studied at a top institution would have been great candidates regardless of where they studied.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    It's not inconceivable that you might sometimes find it a little harder to get a foot in the door. This is particularly so with firms with a more academic bent (and probably the Bar, in general). It's unlikely to make a big difference after that.

    If you went to Lancaster (non-RG) and you outperform someone who went to Manchester (RG) at a firm's assessment day, all else being equal, they're probably going to go for you over him. In fact this is probably true all else not being equal, too -- they run assessments for a reason.

    As noted above, the main reason for some universities' overrepresentation is that they have higher entrance requirements and get an earlier pick of the students than others.

    Most people who got top A levels and studied at a top institution would have been great candidates regardless of where they studied.
    But nowadays some of RG is living on past reputation, they're not as good as they used to be but employers still respect the name. I also agree that from assessment centre stage all is likely equal but getting past that initial stage is difficult


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    (Original post by Ladbants)
    Why would a privately educated guy study agriculture lol
    because their families own lots of farm land they stand to inherit...?
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    (Original post by jordsax19)
    because their families own lots of farm land they stand to inherit...?
    Post 6.

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    The richest farms in England are very wealthy and the children of the these farms tend to take over the family business
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    People need to respect that some 'posh' people are very clever, or had very hardworking/clever families from the working/middle class at some point which enabled their offspring to become posh.

    That said, people need to respect that the working class generally need more nurturing / encouragement and to not be stereotyped as jack the lads and irreverent.

    Blair - or was it first Major- did no use by calling us a classless society whilst wealth differences increased, not aided by introducing tuition fees. We were at our most classless in the 1970s.
 
 
 
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