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    I applied to a job, went to the interview, etc, and I'm concerned I'll get it. My dad really wants me to get it and I do want a job just not this job really and I've been looking for months, so I'm not sure what to do if I somehow get it?

    I feel like I'd have to take it if they offered it to me as I can't really tell my dad I just decided t oturn down a job. But I don't really want this job so I'm not sure what to do.

    Bonus question: If I did take this job would I still be able to look and apply for other jobs or what?
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    The answer to your bonus question is yes.
    Might be worth doing the job, might motivate you to apply to other/better opportunities.
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    (Original post by similarBlank)
    Bonus question: If I did take this job would I still be able to look and apply for other jobs or what?
    Bonus answer: yes, and it puts you in a stronger position because you can pick and choose your next job AND your CV will have a current employment position on it.

    Unless you have a very good reason to turn the job down I'd strongly recommend taking it, do the best you can and see how it goes. Then after 6 months or so, and if you still want to change, start looking again.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Bonus answer: yes, and it puts you in a stronger position because you can pick and choose your next job AND your CV will have a current employment position on it.

    Unless you have a very good reason to turn the job down I'd strongly recommend taking it, do the best you can and see how it goes. Then after 6 months or so, and if you still want to change, start looking again.
    How does the quitting of a job work though? Say I found a job I really likeand I get it wouldn't I need to hand in 30 days notice or something and by then the job I really liked is gone?
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    (Original post by similarBlank)
    How does the quitting of a job work though? Say I found a job I really likeand I get it wouldn't I need to hand in 30 days notice or something and by then the job I really liked is gone?
    No, you apply whilst working at your current job, and if you get the new job then you give notice* to your current employer. Your new employer knows this and will wait.

    It's all very normal.

    *The notice period will depend on your contract of employment. One month is common, but it can be longer. And when you are a new employee, i.e. in your probation period, then a week's notice by either side (from your employer to you, and vice-versa) is standard.
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    (Original post by similarBlank)
    How does the quitting of a job work though? Say I found a job I really likeand I get it wouldn't I need to hand in 30 days notice or something and by then the job I really liked is gone?
    Normally you sign an agreement called a contract of employment where you agree to work for them and they agree to pay you.

    If you wish to end that contract then you must do so by giving notice as agreed in the contract.

    If you had been offered another job and accepted , but didnt have time to serve notice, then you could ask your current employer to let you go early. they probably wouldnt be pleased and might ask you to work out your notice. Ultimately you could ask the new employer to wait or you could go.

    the old employer could make it difficult for you to get your wages plus only provide a very basic reference. they might o out of their way to probide a poor one.


    1. You havent been offered this job yet.
    2. you havent been offered the imaginary one yet either.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    1. You havent been offered this job yet.
    2. you havent been offered the imaginary one yet either.
    Yeah, but I like to be planned and I'm not sure what to say if they phoned up and offered it to me on the spot.
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    (Original post by similarBlank)
    Yeah, but I like to be planned and I'm not sure what to say if they phoned up and offered it to me on the spot. :P
    1. Yes id like the job.
    2. No Ive changed my mind. I only came because of pressure from my dad and everything I told you was really a lie. I think I will wait till a better job comes around.
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    Guys, I just found they they phoned about an hour ago, but they didn't leave a voicemail so I don't know what they want.

    Ugh.
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    (Original post by similarBlank)
    I applied to a job, went to the interview, etc, and I'm concerned I'll get it. My dad really wants me to get it and I do want a job just not this job really and I've been looking for months, so I'm not sure what to do if I somehow get it?

    I feel like I'd have to take it if they offered it to me as I can't really tell my dad I just decided t oturn down a job. But I don't really want this job so I'm not sure what to do.

    Bonus question: If I did take this job would I still be able to look and apply for other jobs or what?
    Your dad is only doing it because he thinks you will benefit from the job.
    As others have said, having a job is better than nothing because competition is extremely high. In other words, you can't be picky; beggars cannot be choosers.

    It is extremely normal for people these days to get a job first and then look for opportunities that may benefit their career.
    Personally I've done jobs that I didn't like but had to because I wanted to be ahead of the competition.
    When I got my first job I started getting interviews, but if I wasn't in that job, I wouldn't receive any replies from my applications. That is how difficult and challenging job hunting can be.

    So in answer to your Bonus Question - Yes go for it. Don't be most people who missed opportunities just because they think they wouldn't enjoy the job, because you will be quite surprised how being in a job can help you kickstart your career. :yes:
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    (Original post by similarBlank)
    Guys, I just found they they phoned about an hour ago, but they didn't leave a voicemail so I don't know what they want.

    Ugh.
    Did you call back?
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    I accepted the job.

    http://i0.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/...Facepalm-1.jpg
    http://rs479.pbsrc.com/albums/rr154/...epalm.jpg~c200
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    Congratulations now you can worry about handing in your notice for the imaginary job you havent applied for or got yet.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Congratulations now you can worry about handing in your notice for the imaginary job you havent applied for or got yet.
    Plus, I need to think what I'm going to do when I get fired from that one.
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    (Original post by similarBlank)
    Plus, I need to think what I'm going to do when I get fired from that one.
    The imaginary one?

    (Congrats BTW)
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    (Original post by jneill)
    The imaginary one?

    (Congrats BTW)
    Yeah. I'm concerned what the person at the job centre will think of me when I try to get Universal Credit because I'm no longer employed.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Normally you sign an agreement called a contract of employment where you agree to work for them and they agree to pay you.

    If you wish to end that contract then you must do so by giving notice as agreed in the contract.

    If you had been offered another job and accepted , but didnt have time to serve notice, then you could ask your current employer to let you go early. they probably wouldnt be pleased and might ask you to work out your notice. Ultimately you could ask the new employer to wait or you could go.

    the old employer could make it difficult for you to get your wages plus only provide a very basic reference. they might o out of their way to probide a poor one.


    1. You havent been offered this job yet.
    2. you havent been offered the imaginary one yet either.
    (Original post by jneill)
    No, you apply whilst working at your current job, and if you get the new job then you give notice* to your current employer. Your new employer knows this and will wait.

    It's all very normal.

    *The notice period will depend on your contract of employment. One month is common, but it can be longer. And when you are a new employee, i.e. in your probation period, then a week's notice by either side (from your employer to you, and vice-versa) is standard.
    (Original post by similarBlank)
    How does the quitting of a job work though? Say I found a job I really likeand I get it wouldn't I need to hand in 30 days notice or something and by then the job I really liked is gone?
    It is worth noting that there is broadly no legal requirement for anyone to provide references outside of some particular industries. Typically, factual references are provided in all cases now to prevent legal action from employees and future employers, but companies can refuse to provide a reference. There are mechanisms that allow for them to recoup money lost by having to replace you immediately if you leave before serving your notice period, but for low-level jobs this is never used really. Overly long notice period are also likely to be unenforceable, but a month certainly will be. Lastly, any threat of not paying you your outstanding accrued statutory holiday entitlement should be disregarded - it would be illegal.

    (Original post by similarBlank)
    Yeah. I'm concerned what the person at the job centre will think of me when I try to get Universal Credit because I'm no longer employed.
    If you leave you will be classed as having made yourself intentionally unemployed and will be subject to a sanction of up to 26 weeks during which time you would only be entitled to hardship payments. In short, bad idea. This is unless you can prove you had good grounds to leave (discrimination, health etc.).
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    the old employer could make it difficult for you to get your wages plus only provide a very basic reference. they might o out of their way to probide a poor one.
    Total nonsense. People leave companies all the time hassle free. An employer making things difficult for you to leave is a rarity - only an idiot would want to tie you to a firm you didn't want to work for as you'd never be productive. And they absolutely cannot go out of their way to give you a 'poor' reference, they can refuse to give you one, they can't make up a derogatory one - because if they do, it has to be based on fact (if it isn't there's a case for legal action).


    To the OP, be more open minded, you might enjoy your new job. Congratulations.
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    (Original post by ByronicHero)
    ...but companies can refuse to provide a reference. .
    Indeed, and it is generally understood that declining to provide a reference is equivalent to giving a bad reference - as you say, companies are much more hesitant about explicitly writing a bad reference for an employee nowadays because of the threat of legal action.
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    (Original post by pmc:producer)
    Total nonsense. People leave companies all the time hassle free. An employer making things difficult for you to leave is a rarity - only an idiot would want to tie you to a firm you didn't want to work for as you'd never be productive. And they absolutely cannot go out of their way to give you a 'poor' reference, they can refuse to give you one, they can't make up a derogatory one - because if they do, it has to be based on fact (if it isn't there's a case for legal action).


    To the OP, be more open minded, you might enjoy your new job. Congratulations.
    Agree they do leave places all the time hassle free. nut they do involve human beings and they can adopt an attitude where they are fine or they can be real pains about it. Pontless, but yes it does happen. More likely in small organisations.

    So looking at my quote I suggested:

    1. That if they were so minded and they felt peeved at you, then paying things like salaries or sorting out holiday pay could be a lot slower. That is just hassle as you cease to be a priority. Seen plenty of threads on here where thats happened.

    2. With references they have scope to be unhelpful. They dont have to gve one. They could for instance raise any problems they had with you as long as it was fair and accurate. i didnt suggest they could just write what they wanted. Its possible to mention things that are entirely truthful, but which do you no favours if someone was so minded. The alternative ofc is to miss such things out and write a glowing reference.

    PS do I think any of the above is likely in this situation? Not unless he was unlucky.
 
 
 
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