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    (Original post by ToastyBread)
    Aye, 16 year olds can have sex, get married, join the forces, work full time, drive a moped, Drink wine/beer with a meal whilst acompanied by an over 18, we can even join trade unions for goodness sake, so why do we not have the vote?, at 16 we are pretty much adults, So why dont we have the vote?

    About that, I am 16, do you think that I, someone who is on a model house of commons forum, would be an 'uninformed voter' although I do agree with the latter *cough cough*UKIP*cough cough*
    Yes, you list a things which require parental permission to do because 16-year-old children are not viewed as being mature enough to make their own decisions. Using participation in the MHoC forum is not a good justification for being informed in politics because as some members show, participation does not mean sense, the ability to reasons, and the ability to think about things.
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    Right, to anyone thinking of using the, at 16 you can leave school etc argument - yes you can. But it's not until 18 that you can actually say that you want to do nothing, and sit on your ass all day. You still have to be in education or work, and do not have the choice of doing **** all. You're not allowed to buy alcohol, knives, fireworks, and a load of other stuff, so this metric of saying you can have sex etc equally justifies the 18 year old argument.
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    Aye, absolutely.

    I thought voting age in local government elections was a devolved power though, just wondering whether the author is aware / knows otherwise?
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    You can get married (with permission) at 16 among many other things. I see no reason why the voting age shouldn't be reduced.
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    (Original post by Quamquam123)
    You can get married (with permission) at 16 among many other things. I see no reason why the voting age shouldn't be reduced.
    I dislike this argument. You can get married (with permission) at 16, but so what? If you're not considered mature or responsible enough to see a horror film or be served in a pub, why should you get the vote?
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    Aye - I fully agree with reducing the voting age to 16.
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    Probably aye. I also wish there were fewer uninformed voters and people voting for stupid reasons but at the same time recognise that the youth should get more of a say about their future. One thing that has to be remembered is that laws should work for now and the future and politicians need to remember that.
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    Nay.
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    No. The line has to be drawn somewhere, and 18 is fine.

    The overwhelming majority of under 18s are not active contributors to the economy. They can't open a bank account, write a will, buy property, serve on a jury etc.

    The only ones who stand to gain from this are parties who hope to get the votes of idealistic dependants and the uninformed teens. The likes of the Green Party for instance.
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    Despite this being a party Bill, I will be voting against it. I don't agree with lowering the voting age and think the current cutoff is just fine.
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    Absolutely not. The fewer immature snowflakes eligible to vote the better!
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    (Original post by mobbsy91)
    Again, as I always say, no! I personally strongly believe that even myself at the age of 16, would've probably thought it quite funny along with my mates to vote for Farage...

    "A logical progression as 16 year olds are at an age where they make real and consequential decisions about their lives and many significant rights are apparent." <-- I think that is entirely subjective, and I could make the same sentence just with 18 instead of 16.
    Ignorant voters should be free to be ignorant.

    Immature voters should be free to be immature.
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    (Original post by _gcx)
    Ignorant voters should be free to be ignorant.

    Immature voters should be free to be immature.
    Says a whole lot about you.
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    (Original post by Aph)
    he youth should get more of a say about their future

    At the risk of sounding confrontational, this is the single worst argument in a thread full of dreadful arguments. Firstly, let's not be euphemistic, we're not talking about "youth". We're talking about children. Plain and simple. As for letting children determine the course of their own future, that's asinine. The whole point of children is that they aren't equipped to do exactly that. If you're going to let kids determine their futures in a secret ballot, that's fine, but don't be arbitrary. Let all kids do it. Then we'll see how quickly the country bankrupts itself on loans to fund its mass purchase of junk food. Swizzels-Matlow will become the new Microsoft and the country will be over in 20 years.

    That's hyperbolic, but the principle remains the same. Kids don't know what's good for them. This is why nobody older than sixteen thinks the voting age should be lowered to sixteen (no normal people, deranged lib dems don't count). Because, when you're older than sixteen, the issues with sixteen year-olds voting become glaringly obvious.
    (Original post by tengentoppa)
    No. The line has to be drawn somewhere, and 18 is fine.

    The overwhelming majority of under 18s are not active contributors to the economy. They can't open a bank account, write a will, buy property, serve on a jury etc.

    There's a case to be made for restricting voting to military members, property owners and the over 35s. I don't see how you can be expected to treat an election with the seriousness it deserves if you're not invested in the future of the country in a serious, material way.

    The only ones who stand to gain from this are parties who hope to get the votes of idealistic dependants and the uninformed teens. The likes of the Green Party for instance.
    :congrats::congrats::congrats:
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    (Original post by Nigel Farage MEP)
    It is not a question of being informed, it is a question of finding a metric to help justify the drawing of an arbitrary boundary for a voting age.
    And what should we aim to base that arbitrary boundary on, if not how well-informed and capable of making an independent decision someone is likely to be?


    (Original post by ATW1)
    Absolutely not. The fewer immature snowflakes eligible to vote the better!
    - Labels millions of people he's never met 'snowflakes' and suggest that they shouldn't be able to vote because they have different opinions to him
    - Claims they're the immature ones
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    Nay.
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    Absolutely not and I'm horrified to learn you still consider this a good idea after what we've been seeing over the last two years from young people, especially arts and humanities students! :eek: Just look at the “I'm a 16 years old marxist” morons and all those liberals protesting against silly made-up phenomena such as “cultural appropriation” or indeed real principles of free society such as free speech who think they're so much smarter than everyone else because they let CNN, Huffington Post and Independent brainwash them… No, voters must be capable of critical thought and have some life experience before taking part in deciding our future. I'd propose to raise the voting age to 21 or 23.
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    (Original post by tengentoppa)
    No. The line has to be drawn somewhere, and 18 is fine.

    The overwhelming majority of under 18s are not active contributors to the economy. They can't open a bank account, write a will, buy property, serve on a jury etc.

    The only ones who stand to gain from this are parties who hope to get the votes of idealistic dependants and the uninformed teens. The likes of the Green Party for instance.
    I opened a bank account when I was 16. I wasn't aware the rules had changed - any idea when that happened?
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    (Original post by Saoirse:3)
    And what should we aim to base that arbitrary boundary on, if not how well-informed and capable of making an independent decision someone is likely to be?




    - Labels millions of people he's never met 'snowflakes' and suggest that they shouldn't be able to vote because they have different opinions to him
    - Claims they're the immature ones
    If we are going to base that arbitrary boundary on how well-informed, and capable an individual is of making a decision, the voting age would be increased to 25 where the mind has fully matured, however, as that is not being proposed here the arbitrary boundary would be based on when a child becomes an adult.
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    (Original post by Life_peer)
    Absolutely not and I'm horrified to learn you still consider this a good idea after what we've been seeing over the last two years from young people, especially arts and humanities students! :eek: Just look at the “I'm a 16 years old marxist” morons and all those liberals protesting against silly made-up phenomena such as “cultural appropriation” or indeed real principles of free society such as free speech who think they're so much smarter than everyone else because they let CNN, Huffington Post and Independent brainwash them… No, voters must be capable of critical thought and have some life experience before taking part in deciding our future. I'd propose to raise the voting age to 21 or 23.
    I could use the same logic to justify Aph's idea of banning the elderly from voting. They're all morons moaning about silly made-up phenomena such as immigrants reducing wages or Gordon Brown causing the financial crisis, who think they're so much smarter just because they've lived longer even though it's the politicians they've elected throughout their lifetimes who've messed things up and they're brainwashed by the Daily Mail, Express etc. The argument would only have any merit if young people widely believed things considered scientifically disproved, like the idea that humans haven't caused climate change, but that isn't the case - they just tend to have different opinions to you, and if you think that's a good reason to disenfranchise people I find that quite worrying.
 
 
 
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