Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

why do MPs do this in the house of commons? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I tuned in to Daily Politics and I was astounded at the behaviour of these noisy and childish MPs. Why do they wail like that?
    I started watching more the other day when someone wolf whistled the PM or whatever happened and I find it ridiculous that these old, bourgeoisie MPs sit there in their suits and what not, yet behave like overgrown children.
    It was a really strange experience and I'm left questing whether or not they are human or a species of their own.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by oh ffs)
    I tuned in to Daily Politics and I was astounded at the behaviour of these noisy and childish MPs. Why do they wail like that?
    I started watching more the other day when somone wolf whistled the PM or whatever happened and I find it ridiculous that these old, bourgeoisie MPs sit there in their suits and what not, yet behave like overgrown children.
    It was a really strange experience and I'm left questing whether or not they are human or a species of their own.
    I know right! Even the dumbest in society seem smarter!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    It shows how boring a career in politics is. Even the politicians have to find a way to entertain themselves.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Tradition, simply and basically.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    I like the tradition and the atmosphere they create in the chamber. It would be boring to listen to them drone on with the others sat there in silence. Is good to have lively speeches and questions with a reaction from the crowd.
    Online

    18
    ReputationRep:
    adam9317 The Financier


    Thread is clearly irrelevant to the MHoC,could one of you two delete it please?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Connor27)
    adam9317 The Financier


    Thread is clearly irrelevant to the MHoC,could one of you two delete it please?
    If you want to become an obnoxious mod, feel free to apply to the purple ranks. I don't see why this thread shouldn't be here; the debate is relevant even to the MHoC.
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Connor27)
    adam9317 The Financier


    Thread is clearly irrelevant to the MHoC,could one of you two delete it please?
    I campaigned to become speaker on facilitating debate and discussion; and that is what I shall do, the thread shall go nowhere!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Connor27)
    adam9317 The Financier


    Thread is clearly irrelevant to the MHoC,could one of you two delete it please?
    Miserable attempt. Pitiful.

    Why are your jimmies so rustled?

    Thanks for the laugh.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Whenever someone says something I agree with in MHOC I bolt up out of my armchair and waft my required reading around. It's hard to explain rationally, just something that comes with proximity to legislation I suppose.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Its largely because the Houses of Parliament still work with a set of rules drawn up in the 17th century, there is a whole host of stupid and nonsensical traditions that really should just be done away with.

    (Original post by Sternumator)
    I like the tradition and the atmosphere they create in the chamber. It would be boring to listen to them drone on with the others sat there in silence. Is good to have lively speeches and questions with a reaction from the crowd.
    The not there to be entertaining. It is worth remembering that for most of the week it is very different, people are quiet, they wait their turn to speak and debates move along a merry little pace. During PMQs however they wind themselves up into a complete frenzy and its basically impossible to have a meaningful discussion because all they are trying to do is one up the person on the other side of the dispatch box, normally by petty name calling and lazy double-speak.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mojojojo101)
    The not there to be entertaining. It is worth remembering that for most of the week it is very different, people are quiet, they wait their turn to speak and debates move along a merry little pace. During PMQs however they wind themselves up into a complete frenzy and its basically impossible to have a meaningful discussion because all they are trying to do is one up the person on the other side of the dispatch box, normally by petty name calling and lazy double-speak.
    They are not there to be entertaining but it helps when it is. As you say, there is plenty of time when it is boring and the chamber is empty and there is boring work in committees going on every day.

    PMQs is entertaining. That is why the chamber is full and why it is the most watched thing each week. That is a good thing, not a bad thing.

    I'm not saying that the boring, serious debate does not have a role but it doesn't have to be like that all the time. The entertainment of PMQs is engaging for politicians and engaging the public. It is only an hour each week and it spices up our democracy.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sternumator)
    They are not there to be entertaining but it helps when it is. As you say, there is plenty of time when it is boring and the chamber is empty and there is boring work in committees going on every day.

    PMQs is entertaining. That is why the chamber is full and why it is the most watched thing each week. That is a good thing, not a bad thing.

    I'm not saying that the boring, serious debate does not have a role but it doesn't have to be like that all the time. The entertainment of PMQs is engaging for politicians and engaging the public. It is only an hour each week and it spices up our democracy.
    PMQs is not entertaining, its depressing, embarrassing and even as someone who doesn't like the House of Commons very much, it presents an image of British politics which just isn't true.

    The chamber is full during PMQs because backbenchers are forced to show up so they can out-shout the people opposite. Oh and PMQs is supposed to last 30mins, its just there is so much nonsense that goes on it normally lasts closer to an hour.

    If we want to have a time alloted to our representatives chucking pithy insults at one another instead of, you know, doing something useful with their time, that's fine, but if that's the case we should probably go the whole hog and get some gunge machines at least.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by oh ffs)
    I tuned in to Daily Politics and I was astounded at the behaviour of these noisy and childish MPs. Why do they wail like that?
    I started watching more the other day when someone wolf whistled the PM or whatever happened and I find it ridiculous that these old, bourgeoisie MPs sit there in their suits and what not, yet behave like overgrown children.
    It was a really strange experience and I'm left questing whether or not they are human or a species of their own.
    Well, that is of course ridiculous. Members of Parliament come from a broad cross-section of society. True, there are over-represented characteristics, but to suggest they are somehow other than a group of pretty bright people from a fairly diverse range of backgrounds is rather silly.

    As for the "behaviour", you're complaining about the set-piece of the week: Prime Minister's questions. It's a show, but one with a great deal of significance. If people genuinely wanted their politics to be a range of tired and consensual discussions, the viewing figures for Westminster Hall debates would be through the roof. They aren't.

    I don't think a bit of shouting or jeering is remotely problematic. It happens at every debating group I've ever attended. While no-one wants to interrupt business, it is - if reasonable - quite democratic to allow all members to have an input and cheer their support or register their objections.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Tradition. Most people who cry about 'bourgeoise politicians' and the likes of parliament would prefer it if we had a crap legislature like Scotland which looks like my local FE college. Some of us have an appreciation for history, distinctiveness and art it seems.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mojojojo101)
    Its largely because the Houses of Parliament still work with a set of rules drawn up in the 17th century, there is a whole host of stupid and nonsensical traditions that really should just be done away with.
    Actually the historic traditions of the Commons were reviewed substantially over the last decade-and-a-bit. In short, silly practices like having to wear a top hat to register a point of order in the division lobbies was done away with; while practices that were either harmless and symbolic (reading the Outlawries Bill formally after the Queen's speech to emphasise the independence of the House in choosing its business) or had a useful purpose were retained.

    (Original post by YoloBaggins00)
    It shows how boring a career in politics is. Even the politicians have to find a way to entertain themselves.
    If I'd ever had a job that was so interesting I found no inclination to joke with colleagues, then I'd have some sympathy for that point. As it is, I think it's ridiculous.
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sternumator)
    I like the tradition and the atmosphere they create in the chamber. It would be boring to listen to them drone on with the others sat there in silence. Is good to have lively speeches and questions with a reaction from the crowd.
    Good point, and I wouldn't want it to become boring either, but it's still unacceptable when this childish behaviour actually gets in the way a bit. Like when a particular MP or party leader gets up to speak and is immediately drowned out by shouting from the opposing side, which I have seen at least once when Corbyn tried to speak.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RF_PineMarten)
    Good point, and I wouldn't want it to become boring either, but it's still unacceptable when this childish behaviour actually gets in the way a bit. Like when a particular MP or party leader gets up to speak and is immediately drowned out by shouting from the opposing side, which I have seen at least once when Corbyn tried to speak.
    Yeah. I'd agree with that.

    I don't see any problem with reacting to what has been said but sometimes the reaction is sustained for an excessive period of time. When someone else stands up and the laughing and shouting carries on so they can't be heard then, I agree, it can get a bit much. It is almost like they keep going purely to drown out the other person.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
    Useful resources

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.