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    Current 2017 GCSE students-How many hours do you revise in a day? When did you start revising?
    Straight A* students- Revision tips, hours you revised per day and when you started revising?
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    Hey, I'm aiming for all A stars and to be honest, I don't know what to do with myself. I've been told that you should start revising now but I just can't get myself to study.And the worst part is I am aware how important this is. SO i need advice as well.
    For all my exams so far I've been cramming the day before for most subjects and I've somehow managed to get A stars in them but regardless, i think that quality revision is much more important than quantity. So it's not really about the amount of hours you revise, its about how long you areable to stay focussd .Also,instead of procrastinating by going on social media or something, just move on to a new subject.
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    Hi @Smarties<3 and bluepearl7,

    I'm actually a first year university student, and admittedly I didn't gain any A*s at GCSE. However, based on my own GCSE and A Level experiences, I can offer some advice which will hopefully be useful to you:
    • Get a copy of the specification for each of your subjects, so you know exactly what you need to learn
    • Make your revision notes early, using the specifications for guidance, ideally as you are going along
    • Ensure you leave yourself plenty of time to revise them before the exams!
    • Attempt past papers under timed conditions if you can - doing this helps you to identify topics you're least confident on and also gets you familiar with the layout and style of questions in the exam
    • Ask your teachers for help if you're unsure about any of the content, if you don't understand something early on in a topic then it may hinder your understanding of the rest of it
    • Consider creating a revision timetable for yourself. Make a list of the topics you want to revise each day and then learn them. I don't recommend trying to revise during specific times or doing a certain number of hours, that can just prove to be more stressful and you probably won't be able to stick to it for long
    • Minimise distractions - turn off your phone, laptop etc, unless you need them for internet research or typing up your notes, find a quiet location to work where you won't be disturbed by family members, etc

    Bluepearl7 is exactly right in that it's the quality of your revision which matters, rather than the quantity. If the material for one subject/topic isn't going in, take a break or switch to a new topic, then go back to the problem topic later.

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by Leviathan1741)
    Hi @Smarties<3 and bluepearl7,

    I'm actually a first year university student, and admittedly I didn't gain any A*s at GCSE. However, based on my own GCSE and A Level experiences, I can offer some advice which will hopefully be useful to you:
    • Get a copy of the specification for each of your subjects, so you know exactly what you need to learn
    • Make your revision notes early, using the specifications for guidance, ideally as you are going along
    • Ensure you leave yourself plenty of time to revise them before the exams!
    • Attempt past papers under timed conditions if you can - doing this helps you to identify topics you're least confident on and also gets you familiar with the layout and style of questions in the exam
    • Ask your teachers for help if you're unsure about any of the content, if you don't understand something early on in a topic then it may hinder your understanding of the rest of it
    • Consider creating a revision timetable for yourself. Make a list of the topics you want to revise each day and then learn them. I don't recommend trying to revise during specific times or doing a certain number of hours, that can just prove to be more stressful and you probably won't be able to stick to it for long
    • Minimise distractions - turn off your phone, laptop etc, unless you need them for internet research or typing up your notes, find a quiet location to work where you won't be disturbed by family members, etc


    Bluepearl7 is exactly right in that it's the quality of your revision which matters, rather than the quantity. If the material for one subject/topic isn't going in, take a break or switch to a new topic, then go back to the problem topic later.

    Good luck!
    Thank you so much.Those tips are really useful!
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    (Original post by bluepearl7)
    Thank you so much.Those tips are really useful!
    You're welcome
 
 
 
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