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    Hi everyone!
    I'm just after reassurance from mature students who have given up a fulltime job and started life as a student.

    I'm 46 and without stating the obvious, I'm a little concerned about going back to University after working all my life. I'm not new to studying as I did an OU degree for the first year and left as my interests change which is why I'm looking at fulltime as what I want to do isn't offered part time (Criminology with Forensic Science).

    Sooooo, giving up a job to be a student terrifies me! I'll have less money and no security, and no idea if I'll get a job at the end of it, but I'm not getting any younger and sometimes you've just got to take a leap of faith...

    If anyone out there can reassure me and also let me know how it felt studying with students much younger then them, please let me know. Incidently, although daunting, I don't really have an issue with the age thing as I get on with everyone, and expect to be on my own at first, but I'm a chatty friendly person and hopefully should make friends.

    Thanks

    Lisa
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    My mum is 44 studying in a red brick uni after the last studying she did was an AAT course years ago. She's enjoying her studies and is getting well with all ages at her uni - although she was unemployed prior to enrolling. She struggles financially as she has two kids along with a full maintenance loan, commuting 40 minutes a day. It's harder for her to have kids and study but she's glad she's doing it. Students in her class vary from 19 to 44 - they all get on well.

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    You'll be fine!

    I'm 31 and just started uni full-time, get on well with all ages (comp sci so 95% of the people in my course are school leavers).

    Tbh if you did TOU last year like myself, you will find doing full-time study instead of part time study + work a hell of a lot easier, I nearly overloaded last year trying to balance both!
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    I did OU for two years and did struggle at times, especially when it was TMA's and I still had to work! I'm glad you said that being at a brick one will be easier and gives me yet another reason to just do it! ☺
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    (Original post by Lisa-n)
    Hi everyone!
    I'm just after reassurance from mature students who have given up a fulltime job and started life as a student.

    I'm 46 and without stating the obvious, I'm a little concerned about going back to University after working all my life. I'm not new to studying as I did an OU degree for the first year and left as my interests change which is why I'm looking at fulltime as what I want to do isn't offered part time (Criminology with Forensic Science).

    Sooooo, giving up a job to be a student terrifies me! I'll have less money and no security, and no idea if I'll get a job at the end of it, but I'm not getting any younger and sometimes you've just got to take a leap of faith...

    If anyone out there can reassure me and also let me know how it felt studying with students much younger then them, please let me know. Incidently, although daunting, I don't really have an issue with the age thing as I get on with everyone, and expect to be on my own at first, but I'm a chatty friendly person and hopefully should make friends.

    Thanks

    Lisa
    I started my undergrad degree aged 44 after jacking in my career in IT. Best thing I ever did. I got the study bug and went on to do a Masters and attempt a PhD. I now work on short contracts at my local uni. Much of that work is as a Research Assistant, which is essentially learning loads of new stuff whilst being paid for it.

    Downsides include the lack of money. I live on my own and had no escape plan. On the other hand, I had saved up and paid off the mortgage before I started. Fitting into a cohort of younger students can take time - some of them just don't know how to deal with us oldies. But after the first year I was just part of the furniture and they were a friendly bunch who were a pleasure to spend time with. I find being in a youth-oriented environment is hugely energising. I have trouble being jaded and middle-aged when surrounded by such energy and potential.

    I envy you starting out on the adventure - I'd do it again in a heartbeat. It turned my life around and made it so much better!
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    P.S. It's terrifying! For the first term, I used to have to lock myself in the loo for ten minutes to calm down, whenever I arrived on campus. But just because something is scary, doesn't mean it won't be good. If you throw yourself into the experience, you very soon won't have time to be nervous any more
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    I'm glad to hear that your mum doesn't regret even when she struggles financially. I too have kids and it can be tough at times. I wish your mum all the best in her studying 😁
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    [QUOTE=Klix88;69939972]I started my undergrad degree aged 44 after jacking in my career in IT. Best thing I ever did. I got the study bug and went on to do a Masters and attempt a PhD. I now work on short contracts at my local uni. Much of that work is as a Research Assistant, which is essentially learning loads of new stuff whilst being paid for it.

    Downsides include the lack of money. I live on my own and had no escape plan. On the other hand, I had saved up and paid off the mortgage before I started. Fitting into a cohort of younger students can take time - some of them just don't know how to deal with us oldies. But after the first year I was just part of the furniture and they were a friendly bunch who were a pleasure to spend time with. I find being in a youth-oriented environment is hugely energising. I have trouble being jaded and middle-aged when surrounded by such energy and potential.

    I envy you starting out on the adventure - I'd do it again in a heartbeat. It turned my life around and made it so much better![/QUOTE

    To say you'd do it all again just motivates me even more. I'm in a job that I don't enjoy anymore and have stayed there as it offers stability. For years I wanted to study on a new career path but kept bringing up excuses not to do it. Financially I will struggle but I'm fed up now and want to take a risk ☺
 
 
 
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