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How much do you spend per month on luxuries? Watch

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    Hi all,

    I'm wondering what a normal amount to spend per month on luxuries (clothes, eating out - including buying lunch rather than making your own, gym membership etc)?

    I have just started working but am living at home. My commute expense is ridiculous, so despite having little actual living costs, I want to cut down on luxuries so I can save more. Now that I'm working I feel as though I'm more reckless with buying luxuries (not extortionate by any means but I could be more strict, and I don't mind e.g. hardly ever buying new clothes or eating out).

    And does anyone have tips to cut down whilst also having a social life or good quality of life?
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    (Original post by roflcakes1)
    Hi all,

    I'm wondering what a normal amount to spend per month on luxuries (clothes, eating out - including buying lunch rather than making your own, gym membership etc)?

    I have just started working but am living at home. My commute expense is ridiculous, so despite having little actual living costs, I want to cut down on luxuries so I can save more. Now that I'm working I feel as though I'm more reckless with buying luxuries (not extortionate by any means but I could be more strict, and I don't mind e.g. hardly ever buying new clothes or eating out).

    And does anyone have tips to cut down whilst also having a social life or good quality of life?
    I almost never buy clothes... apart from the odd bit of fancy dress but I wouldn't describe that as normal...

    Annoyingly my eating out habits vary.. could go a whole week living on leftover food for lunch from the previous dinner, or have a pizza takeaway and some lunch that I can grab... I find hat only carrying enough money to buy a snack at best helps :lol:

    I'm guessing cycling isn't an options, it sounds like a long train journey
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    Maybe a £10 for clothes and things.
    On top of that I spend 4.50£ a week on half a pizza for movie night at my uni flat
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    (Original post by roflcakes1)
    Hi all,

    I'm wondering what a normal amount to spend per month on luxuries (clothes, eating out - including buying lunch rather than making your own, gym membership etc)?

    I have just started working but am living at home. My commute expense is ridiculous, so despite having little actual living costs, I want to cut down on luxuries so I can save more. Now that I'm working I feel as though I'm more reckless with buying luxuries (not extortionate by any means but I could be more strict, and I don't mind e.g. hardly ever buying new clothes or eating out).

    And does anyone have tips to cut down whilst also having a social life or good quality of life?
    There is no 'normal' amount - what one person thinks extravagant would be parsimonious to another.
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    Last summer I spent £500/month on drugs and £2000/month on women. Does that count as a luxury? :P
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    My luxury costs are pretty much zero.

    --I don't buy new clothes, I have plenty already and there's nothing wrong with them
    --I don't eat out, I buy all my food and cook for myself
    --I don't have a gym membership, I invested in some cheap equipment that I use in the flat or go out running
    --I'm a gamer but since I started uni I've purchased maybe 2 or 3 games. It's not a regular thing so it probably averages out to maybe £10-20 per month but in reality it's one purchase every now and then
    --I don't drink so I never have to worry about nights out
    --All my membership fees and equipment for th evarious societies I joined was paid for at the beginning of the year. If I paid monthly it'd come out to around £10 per month
    --My only semi-regular luxury expense is buying books, which might be £10-20 per month. Given that some of them are course related it's difficult to say they're a luxury though.

    If I added up all the little stuff we might be talking £50 at the most per month. I've easily had months that cost me less thatn £10 though
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    I aim to limit my general spending to £100 per month.
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    (Original post by roflcakes1)
    Hi all,

    I'm wondering what a normal amount to spend per month on luxuries (clothes, eating out - including buying lunch rather than making your own, gym membership etc)?

    I have just started working but am living at home. My commute expense is ridiculous, so despite having little actual living costs, I want to cut down on luxuries so I can save more. Now that I'm working I feel as though I'm more reckless with buying luxuries (not extortionate by any means but I could be more strict, and I don't mind e.g. hardly ever buying new clothes or eating out).

    And does anyone have tips to cut down whilst also having a social life or good quality of life?
    people work to spend money and enjoy life. I woudnt worry about it, and just spend and eat out with your friends.

    Obvs do not get into debt you cannot afford to pay off
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    I aim for a weekly food budget of about £15, I add maybe £20 a month for nights out, averaging maybe one a month. £10 a week travelling. All in all I am trying to spend no more than £100 a month.

    I do not buy clothes.
    Gym membership, cinema etc. comes out of my night out budget.
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    (Original post by That Bearded Man)
    I aim for a weekly food budget of about £15, I add maybe £20 a month for nights out, averaging maybe one a month. £10 a week travelling. All in all I am trying to spend no more than £100 a month.

    I do not buy clothes.
    Gym membership, cinema etc. comes out of my night out budget.
    Out of interest, why would you put gym membership in the night out budget? If you're adding £20 per month for nights out, and know that a gym membership each month, is just for example, £10 a month, why not just budget it that way...?
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    (Original post by mobbsy91)
    Out of interest, why would you put gym membership in the night out budget? If you're adding £20 per month for nights out, and know that a gym membership each month, is just for example, £10 a month, why not just budget it that way...?
    As in, it depends on how long I'll realistically be up, then if I decide I'll use it, I'll get my month for £12.50 and that means that I'll just spend less on night outs
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    (Original post by That Bearded Man)
    As in, it depends on how long I'll realistically be up, then if I decide I'll use it, I'll get my month for £12.50 and that means that I'll just spend less on night outs
    Ohh I see! Double benefit then by cutting down on the nights out

    Yeh, my membership at the moment I've frozen because when I couple the monthly cost of £17 on top of the driving to get there with it being over 4 miles away, going about 4-5 times a week, it'd be costing me about £35-40...

    I think I'm going to switch to *free* running and cycling outside... also way more interesting than standing on a treadmill xD
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    (Original post by mobbsy91)
    Ohh I see! Double benefit then by cutting down on the nights out

    Yeh, my membership at the moment I've frozen because when I couple the monthly cost of £17 on top of the driving to get there with it being over 4 miles away, going about 4-5 times a week, it'd be costing me about £35-40...

    I think I'm going to switch to *free* running and cycling outside... also way more interesting than standing on a treadmill xD
    I don't agree tbh, I'm about half an hour walk away but I love the gym
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    £50 of you include food I don't need to be buying and when I forget to take a packed lunch to work.
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    Quite a lot. Gym membership is £20, then going out for a fancy meal (around £25/week). And I buy clothes frequently, etc. Gig tickets are also a big expense. I easily spend £300+ a month.

    But thats fine because my parents give me quite a bit, and I make around £450 a month so I spend and still save quite a lot.

    Oh and I live with my parents so expenses like electricty, water and rent are not applicable.
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    Too much money.

    I love spending my parents' money.





















    Jk, I have my own job.
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    £200- £500 per month. Mostly on eating out and cosmetics/ clothes.
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    Very approximately, on average, 200-250 on eating out, 350 clothes, don't go to the gym but tennis is about 90, then there are nights out, alcohol, books, gadgets...
    But, since it looks like I'm somehow not heading towards bankruptcy, I evidently manage to balance it (e.g. this month I spent much more on clothes but nearly nothing on drinks/eating out, last month I spent on a gadget but not on clothes, month before I overspent on dining, clubs and drinks but not much on the rest, etc.).

    Tip if you want to get into clothing. Buy well, buy once. Not sure about a piece of clothing? 80% of the time you won't be satisfied. Never, ever buy a "meh" one, whatever the price/function/need. You will end up spending overall more and being less content with your look. I have dozens of shirts, but among them I am totally satisfied only by a small percentage, maybe 7, probably less. Had I been wise and bought only great shirts I would be better off.

    (Original post by Acsel)
    --I don't buy new clothes, I have plenty already and there's nothing wrong with them
    Either you are truly lucky or you can't see what's wrong with them. There is always that new fashion, that new trend or new style that I want to try as I grow up, and that colour or fit or piece I lack... it's a struggle.

    (Original post by Acsel)
    --I don't drink so I never have to worry about nights out
    --My only semi-regular luxury expense is buying books.
    Looks exciting! I'm joking, love books too, they can (and should) fill people's life much more than wagons of other superficial stuff.
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    (Original post by usualsuspects)
    Either you are truly lucky or you can't see what's wrong with them. There is always that new fashion, that new trend or new style that I want to try as I grow up, and that colour or fit or piece I lack... it's a struggle.
    I don't see clothing as a fashion symbol. I see clothing as almost purely practical. Before I was a student I'd buy clothes if they looked nice and as a result have dozens of shirts. But now, as a student it's not at all a justifiable cost. All my clothes fit, are comfortable and are not damaged beyond wear. I own a pair of jeans for example that I've had for several years. They're fraying at the ankles but apart from that they are fine. That's probably the worst piece of clothing I own. I have no intention of replacing them because I own another identical pair, a few other pairs of jeans and simply don't need any.

    I don't even follow "fashion". I buy what I like, rather than what other people decide are in fashion. It's neither an issue or being lucky or not seeing what's wrong with the clothes. The clothes are functional and that's all there is too it. I've personally got more important things to worry.

    As far as colour goes, I tend to pick darker colours so I never have issues of things not matching. Not that I'd be fussed if there were a problem. If appropriate I'll dress up and make sure I'm presentable for the occasion. Otherwise I wear whatever is to hand.


    Of course the fact that I don't drink or party helps, because I don't have that "dress to impress mentality". It really doesn't matter what I wear in my room while reading for example.

    (Original post by usualsuspects)
    Looks exciting! I'm joking, love books too, they can (and should) fill people's life much more than wagons of other superficial stuff.
    While you are joking, I'm sure there are plenty of people that would genuinely find me an unintersting person. And that's totally fine. Everyone is free to do whatever they enjoy.
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    (Original post by Acsel)


    While you are joking, I'm sure there are plenty of people that would genuinely find me an unintersting person. And that's totally fine. Everyone is free to do whatever they enjoy.
    Yeah, young people tend to be rather superficial.
 
 
 
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