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    (Original post by Mimikyu)
    I have been to the Pokemon centre more times than I can count. I love it~! And yeah, it does look as amazing as the pictures. However, I know a lot of older fans are disappointed that the Pokemon centres focus on the new generation pokemon however.

    Recently because of Pokemon Go however, a lot of goods for the older generations have been popping up!

    As for atmosphere, it's a huge shop with a few pay for play games tucked away in the corner. The staff are lovely, the store is bright and clean and it's a pleasant shopping experience. They usually have a lottery at the weekend and sometimes they have an event where you can "fish" for Magikarp (They're magnetic fish and a rod with a magnet on the end.) If you have a 3DS they're usually giving away a Pokemon for the latest game, and a lot of the time they have an exclusive move-set or are shiny. They will also have a poor worker come out in a Pikachu suit at the weekend for the little kids to say Hi too, and very occasionally there will be an amazing cosplayer who goes through the store and makes comments about the goods. (Recently they had all the team rocket/plasma etc leaders visit stores which was pretty cool.) Each Pokemon centre also has region exclusive goods which makes you just want to visit them all!

    Definitely worth a visit if you come to Japan.
    That sounds absolutely amazing! Especially for such a long time fan as myself. I've always wanted to go to the Pokemon center, and now I do even more so. Thank you so much for all that info! Also, how expensive is the merchandise there?
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    So my ambition is to be a vocalist there - and do it professionally. I am pretty serious about it so I hope I dont sound cheesy XD
    how likely is it to find, say, talented band members in cities like Tokyo/ Yokohama etc? Or are there events where all the music enthusiasts go to meet each other/ perform? Kinda like open mic nights i guess??

    Also, do you have any idea if getting a degree in japanese only will make me less employable for anything other than teaching? Because I want to be able to support myself in some job whilst I work on getting my musical career together :P
    Since we`re at it, how is class etiquette there? I imagine generally kids would be much more disciplined than these creeps I went to primary and secondary with XD
    I hope you don`t mind me asking - is the teaching pay in big cities enough to live comfortably (pay rent, eat out occasionally, afford some luxuries like a weekend out in another city every couple of months etcetcetc)

    Aaaand finally, how easy/ difficult would you say it is for a foreign artist to promote themselves there (bearing in mind the style of music is in japanese)?

    Sorry for so many questions!! ~~
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    (Original post by Mimi9335)
    So my ambition is to be a vocalist there - and do it professionally. I am pretty serious about it so I hope I dont sound cheesy XD
    how likely is it to find, say, talented band members in cities like Tokyo/ Yokohama etc? Or are there events where all the music enthusiasts go to meet each other/ perform? Kinda like open mic nights i guess??

    Also, do you have any idea if getting a degree in japanese only will make me less employable for anything other than teaching? Because I want to be able to support myself in some job whilst I work on getting my musical career together :P
    Since we`re at it, how is class etiquette there? I imagine generally kids would be much more disciplined than these creeps I went to primary and secondary with XD
    I hope you don`t mind me asking - is the teaching pay in big cities enough to live comfortably (pay rent, eat out occasionally, afford some luxuries like a weekend out in another city every couple of months etcetcetc)

    Aaaand finally, how easy/ difficult would you say it is for a foreign artist to promote themselves there (bearing in mind the style of music is in japanese)?

    Sorry for so many questions!! ~~
    There are many unusual opportunities you can find in Japan. I would encourage you to go and try - you will only find them there, not from here. However, for the many people who find or create something, it unfortunately can be very difficult to transfer it to another country. What that means is that people can get stuck there, in a niche they can't re-create somewhere they like better.

    For example, I knew a talented young lady who got a gig directing a weekly TV show, a fantastic thing with more responsibility than she could have hoped. But she couldn't get anything going when she returned to Canada. I myself was able to support myself completely from freelance journalism, a circumstance I have never been able to recreate in the US or Europe.
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    Do you think Brexit will see Theresa May knocking on Japan's door for a special trade deal?

    And will the Japanese entertain her request?
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    Hey, I heard from a friend that lives in Japan that eating out at restaurants is often cheaper than buying and making food at home from supermarkets (particularly if it is fruit and vegetable rich)
    Have you found this to be the case?
    Thank you ^^
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    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    Do you find the workplace culture to be sexist? I remember reading that males often still expect their female colleagues to prepare tea for them etc?
    Very short answer: Yes, incredibly so. Now the slightly longer answer. It is something that is done at the city hall (one of my workplaces) in almost every department. Woman will also be paid less, because they are often seen as a dependant of someone and therefore don’t need as much money.

    One of my female workers actually reminded me recently of the culture of women walking 3 steps behind men… I’m not sure what I had done, but I had apparently been too assertive as a woman?

    It does work in your favour sometimes. Female workers often don’t have to pay as much for drinking parties, as they are seen as drinking less. And they’re allowed to leave work a little earlier (they still work over time) because they must cook dinner and look after the children.

    Can you tell I’m a little bitter? Hahaha

    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    Is there any vegetarian food/cuisine in Japan? Also have you been to the Sakura festival? It looks so beautiful!
    There are some vegetarian restaurants in Japan, and I have been to a few vegans ones as well… but it’s not wide spread. Your typical restaurant will not have a vegetarian option, and if you ask for a dish with no meat they often come back with chicken, or a pork broth based soup. You also have to watch out for curry sauces, as they will often have minced/diced meat in them. Indian restaurants, of which there are many, are pretty much guaranteed to have vegetarian options!

    I have been cherry blossom viewing. It’s a great excuse to get drunk outside, surrounded by beautiful trees in full bloom. I love it, and I’m a little upset about probably missing it this year :C

    (Original post by quasa)
    do you watch anime, if so what do you like?
    I do like anime… but I don’t really watch it anymore. I think I will start watching it again in the UK. The reason I don’t watch it at the moment is that I already listen to Japanese all day... I wanna come home and relax. I don’t want to think too hard. I usually end up watching a Panorama documentary or the Great British Bake-off.

    As for what I like… I love Genkan Shojo Nozaki-kun, Yuri on Ice, Haikyu, TRC, FMA, Claymore, Food Wars: Shokugeki no Soma, Jellyfish Princess, Eden of the East? Everything and anything really.

    Do you like anime?

    (Original post by miser)
    How's the temperature down in Fukuoka? I went to Nagoya last summer and almost passed out exercising, even in the evening. That was crazy!

    I live in Tokyo by the way. [img]file:///C:/Users/Groot/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image001.png[/img]
    Hey! Hope you’re having a great time in Tokyo!

    Right now, it’s so cold. It’s around 6 degrees on average and I’m not enjoying it at all. The summer is pretty hot. Usually over 30, with 70% humidity at least. If you struggled in Nagoya, you would struggle here!

    (Original post by Rhi_w)
    That sounds absolutely amazing! Especially for such a long time fan as myself. I've always wanted to go to the Pokemon center, and now I do even more so. Thank you so much for all that info! Also, how expensive is the merchandise there?
    It’s not that expensive… but I have been in Japan a long time, so my understand of expensive may be a little off. You can get a medium sized cuddly toy for around 15 pounds? And you can get a cute pair of earrings for around 4 pounds? It really depends on what you want, and if you’re on a budget they have cute notebooks, pens, clear file folders and keyrings that are reasonably priced.

    The thing is… the quality is really high. I bought a back pack from there, which I have been using almost every day for 2 years and it’s still going. It doesn’t look that tatty at all, and there is no sign of it falling apart anytime soon! I spent about 30 pounds on that…. Although they have a few going for around 60 just now that I’m sorely tempted by.

    You should look at the American Pokemon centre website and decide for yourself about prices!

    https://www.pokemoncenter.com/

    It doesn’t have everything you would get in Japan… but on the other hand it has a lot of exclusive goods too!

    I'm gonna take a small break here and have a cup of tea! Feel free to keep the questions coming. I will get to you eventually!
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    (Original post by Mimikyu)
    Hey! Hope you’re having a great time in Tokyo!

    Right now, it’s so cold. It’s around 6 degrees on average and I’m not enjoying it at all. The summer is pretty hot. Usually over 30, with 70% humidity at least. If you struggled in Nagoya, you would struggle here!
    That's what I thought! Still, it won't hold me back from visiting.

    I'm currently studying at a language school, but after I finish I'm also considering becoming an english teacher. It'd be nice to live somewhere outside the city I think.
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    (Original post by miser)
    That's what I thought! Still, it won't hold me back from visiting.

    I'm currently studying at a language school, but after I finish I'm also considering becoming an english teacher. It'd be nice to live somewhere outside the city I think.
    For your Japanese I would say you should go for it! Just make sure the town is on a train line, and that you're not too far away from a city! You'll appreciate having the option to visit!
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    (Original post by Mimikyu)
    For your Japanese I would say you should go for it! Just make sure the town is on a train line, and that you're not too far away from a city! You'll appreciate having the option to visit!
    Good advice.
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    Just curious - what's the attitude towards people speaking/writing other languages? English being the exception, maybe. As I said before I'm Welsh first-language, so I do all my notes / speaking out loud in that aha. Is that gonna get me lynched?

    Slightly random question though but since someone asked about the Pokemon Center - do they have any stuff for Altaria (Tyltalis)? It's my favourite but I've literally never seen any merchandise for it ;-;
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    The prices at the Pokemon center sound pretty decent going by what you're saying! I was hoping they wouldn't be too expensive, as buying Pokemon center plush and etc in England is ridiculous, but that must just be for shipping and import fees then. Thanks again for everything you've said! I really look forward to visiting some of the Pokemon centers sometime
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    (Original post by alcibiade)
    There are many unusual opportunities you can find in Japan. I would encourage you to go and try - you will only find them there, not from here. However, for the many people who find or create something, it unfortunately can be very difficult to transfer it to another country. What that means is that people can get stuck there, in a niche they can't re-create somewhere they like better.

    For example, I knew a talented young lady who got a gig directing a weekly TV show, a fantastic thing with more responsibility than she could have hoped. But she couldn't get anything going when she returned to Canada. I myself was able to support myself completely from freelance journalism, a circumstance I have never been able to recreate in the US or Europe.
    Thank you so much for your response!!
    I`m definitely planning on giving it a go and I completely get you - since every country has it`s own level of demand for the arts, adapting to one country`s demand and supply system could mean finding it awkward to adjust to another country`s lesser demand. That`s one of the main reasons I want to move there, the demand for vkei music is just higher there than, say, London.

    But it definitely depends on the individual circumstances, like you said.
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    (Original post by Mimikyu)
    I have been living in Japan for over 3 years now, so if there is anything you want to ask... go ahead.

    I'm a 25 y/o female however, so I probably do not know that much about the seedier side of things.
    how come you moved all the way to Japan? I'd love to go there one day, just wondering
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    (Original post by Mimikyu)
    I have been living in Japan for over 3 years now, so if there is anything you want to ask... go ahead.

    I'm a 25 y/o female however, so I probably do not know that much about the seedier side of things.
    How often do you see other people who aren't Japanese and how do Japanese people tend to approach you?
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    (Original post by Mimi9335)
    Thank you so much for your response!!
    I`m definitely planning on giving it a go and I completely get you - since every country has it`s own level of demand for the arts, adapting to one country`s demand and supply system could mean finding it awkward to adjust to another country`s lesser demand. That`s one of the main reasons I want to move there, the demand for vkei music is just higher there than, say, London.

    But it definitely depends on the individual circumstances, like you said.
    You'll have a great adventure, discover things you can't imagine, and grow. Good luck.
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    (Original post by Athena64)
    Ah, thank you for your advice, I'll definitely bring along some snacks for my host family!

    We're taking the bullet train to visit some of the major cities (Tokyo and Kyoto), and I was wondering what this is like? If you've ever taken it? Are there many tunnels?

    I also am a life-long vegetarian and don't eat fish, and have arfid, so I'm worried about eating there. But I love rice and ramen, so I'm hoping I can just eat that?
    Hey! I have been on the bullet train, and it does have some tunnels. But they don't last too long. And it's just like a normal train, except a bit faster? You also have a bit more leg room. You'll see some Japanese families make it into a bit of a ritual, bringing lunch boxes and playing Uno or other card games. Also, you'll probably see other families just relaxing and playing 3DS' or watching stuff on a tablet! If you've been on a train in the UK you won't be too surprised! Look out for Mount Fuji on the way to Tokyo/Kyoto though!

    Have you let your host family know about your special eating requirements? Because vegetarianism isn't as widespread in Japan as it is in the UK/America. I am positive you will be able to get rice... however, I have only ever heard of one Ramen restaurant in Japan that has a vegetarian variety in Japan. A lot of the soups are pork broth... If you're in Kyoto you should check it out, it's called Ippudo. Your host family should know it! Also, upon googling Ippudo a few more hits came up for vegetarian ramen, so you should be fine! Just be aware that special dietary requirements in Japan are a bit of a mystery at your everyday, typical restaurants. You should be prepared to go out of your way, and spend a little bit more cash, to meet said requirements.

    Your host mother might make lunch boxes for you, and cook dinner so you might not even have to worry about eating out! Just make sure your host family is fully aware of your eating habits!

    It wouldn't be a bad idea to bring some food that you know you can eat, just in case. I showed a couple of vegetarians/restricted diet people around Japan a while back and they brought a lot of breakfast bars which really helped them out in the end.
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    (Original post by Mimi9335)
    So my ambition is to be a vocalist there - and do it professionally. I am pretty serious about it so I hope I dont sound cheesy XD

    how likely is it to find, say, talented band members in cities like Tokyo/ Yokohama etc? Or are there events where all the music enthusiasts go to meet each other/ perform? Kinda like open mic nights i guess??
    I am glad alcibiade has been the nice cop…. Cause I’m gonna be a more realistic about this.

    It’s not impossible! But you are going to find it to be very different from the UK.

    A lot of bands are manufactured by companies, or meet in highschool/university at societies. So, you’re already a bit behind in that aspect. I have never seen an open mic night; however I have never looked. Perhaps you should google it and see what comes up.

    I also know from experience (my friend is in a band – he is a foreigner but he has been living here for over 20 years) that venues expect you to sell a certain number of tickets. If you don’t sell that amount then you have to pay the venue money for the privilege of performing there. The price is usually the value of all the tickets you didn’t sell. That can get pretty pricey after a while. Venues rarely pay you for performances, and free drinks for the band are almost never offered.

    Also, you will just have bars that won’t want to deal with foreigners. Maybe they have had bad experiences, maybe they think it’s just too much hassle… they don't like English... god knows why, but you will face situations like that as well. I know my friend has been quite successful because he has been drinking for years at the bars he now plays at. He is also an attractive white male, which gets you pretty far in Japan.

    (Original post by Mimi9335)
    Also, do you have any idea if getting a degree in japanese only will make me less employable for anything other than teaching? Because I want to be able to support myself in some job whilst I work on getting my musical career together :P
    A degree that is just in Japanese isn’t great for employment in Japan. If you’re in Japan, speaking Japanese is kind of a given. Also, a lot of English schools prefer to have teachers who don’t know Japanese. I would suggest a combined degree… preferably with business if you’re looking for a day job. Also, work for a foreign company in Japan. If you work for a Japanese company you will have no free time, as you will be expected to work late and go drinking with colleagues. While this is the case for some foreign companies, it is not as bad as the Japanese ones.

    A lot of people start off with a teaching job, and then look for another job in their preferred field while working at the English school. Starting off at the English school gives you access to a work visa and therefore plenty of time to look for another job!

    (Original post by Mimi9335)
    Since we`re at it, how is class etiquette there? I imagine generally kids would be much more disciplined than these creeps I went to primary and secondary with XD
    It depends on the school. Some schools, the worst thing you will get is a kid falling asleep at their desk. At other schools you will have kids throwing chairs across the classroom and picking fights every other minute. It’s a lot like the UK in that respect, Elementary schools are a safe bet because the kids are still sweet and innocent, and the Homeroom teachers still scare the bejeebus out of them!

    (Original post by Mimi9335)
    I hope you don`t mind me asking - is the teaching pay in big cities enough to live comfortably (pay rent, eat out occasionally, afford some luxuries like a weekend out in another city every couple of months etcetcetc)
    Companies like Interact, OWLS and KBS? No. Nowhere near enough, even if they say they do give you enough to have a comfortable life. Avoid any companies that have the word dispatch on their website or in reviews of them. For a big city you’re looking at at least 250,000 a year, with pay increases of at least 20,000 each year to cover taxes from the previous year. JET guarantees that, but that programme is very competitive and can be time consuming when you arrive in Japan. I also believe Tokyo Jets have to find their own accommodation.

    (Original post by Mimi9335)
    Aaaand finally, how easy/ difficult would you say it is for a foreign artist to promote themselves there (bearing in mind the style of music is in japanese)?
    Posters, word of mouth, facebook etc will not be hard at all. However, a lot of Japanese people who got to see foreign musicians see it as a good way of practicing English. I’m not quite sure how a foreign artist singing in Japanese would go down. I would think the immigrant community (I do not like the phrase ex-pat) would probably be supportive of you however, and a gathering of foreigners would attract a Japanese audience as well! Hopefully your music will encourage them to stay.

    To go on TV your Japanese will have to be spot-on. I have seen interviews done in Japanese and English, with translators, but that is usually reserved for stars like Lady Gaga and Tom Cruise, who are already established abroad.

    I hope I haven’t been too harsh. Best of luck.
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    (Original post by Edo123)
    Do you think Brexit will see Theresa May knocking on Japan's door for a special trade deal?

    And will the Japanese entertain her request?
    (Original post by veganrockchick)
    Hey, I heard from a friend that lives in Japan that eating out at restaurants is often cheaper than buying and making food at home from supermarkets (particularly if it is fruit and vegetable rich)
    Have you found this to be the case?
    Thank you ^^
    (Original post by SkyRees)
    Just curious - what's the attitude towards people speaking/writing other languages? English being the exception, maybe. As I said before I'm Welsh first-language, so I do all my notes / speaking out loud in that aha. Is that gonna get me lynched?

    Slightly random question though but since someone asked about the Pokemon Center - do they have any stuff for Altaria (Tyltalis)? It's my favourite but I've literally never seen any merchandise for it ;-;
    It won't get you lynched! Japanese people might give you more space than they normally would an English speaker though!

    They do have stuff for Altaria (and it's pre-evolutions) It tends to be on blue colour schemed goods, or little figurines/charms when they release goods of all of the pokemon (They did that a while back with phone charms). I did see a super cute swablu butt pillow recently. (I got the pikachu one.) If you visit the pokemon centre however, it's more than likely not going to be there. Sorry for the bad news! I am sure you can find some goods online though!

    (Original post by 27FT)
    how come you moved all the way to Japan? I'd love to go there one day, just wondering
    I studied Japanese at University and it kinda just led on to living in Japan! You should definitely visit Japan! It's a great country with an amazing history and unique culture. The food is delicious, the weather in spring is lovely and the people for the most part are very hospitable!

    (Original post by Kravence)
    How often do you see other people who aren't Japanese and how do Japanese people tend to approach you?
    I see people who are foreign almost once a week, if I don't make an effort to meet up with friends in the closest city. When I go to the city hall, I usually see a foreign co-worker. If I make an effort I usually see a foreigner twice/three times a week. In day to day life however, it almost never happens.

    Japanese people don't approach me that often anymore. I think they are more likely to approach someone who looks lost/confused and I'm none of those things anymore. However, there are some exceptions. I have been approached about teaching English, and guys around my age have invited me out to Karaoke. You can avoid these things by putting on a pair of earphones however, or just having a book on hand.

    That said, I once had a very odd encounter with a middle-aged, overweight, Japanese salary man while wearing headphones. He ran up the stairs after me - I was running for a monorail - and offered to carry my bags, because they looked heavy. In pretty good Japanese I apologised and said I didn't understand Japanese and rushed off to catch the monorail away. I think it is one of my few encounters with a Japanese pervert.
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    (Original post by Mimikyu)
    I do like anime… but I don’t really watch it anymore. I think I will start watching it again in the UK. The reason I don’t watch it at the moment is that I already listen to Japanese all day... I wanna come home and relax. I don’t want to think too hard. I usually end up watching a Panorama documentary or the Great British Bake-off.

    As for what I like… I love Genkan Shojo Nozaki-kun, Yuri on Ice, Haikyu, TRC, FMA, Claymore, Food Wars: Shokugeki no Soma, Jellyfish Princess, Eden of the East? Everything and anything really.

    Do you like anime?



    nice list of anime (ive heard good things about claymore and people seem to like yuri on ice).

    personally I used o be a lot more into anime but am weaning off it. essentially at the moment, im current watching Dragon Ball super and tekketsu no orphans and waiting for them to finish but I cant be asked waiting for new seasons of drifters, attack on titan or one punch man
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    Mimikyu

    What advice would you give to people looking to move to an entirely foreign country? Both before going and once they get there?


    (I'm hoping to move to China next year).
 
 
 
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