Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi

    Please could current (or recent) medical students advise whether it's necessary or advisable to have a skeleton for undergraduate studies? If so, did you buy your own or did your med school loan one to you?

    Thanks
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thraag)
    Hi

    Please could current (or recent) medical students advise whether it's necessary or advisable to have a skeleton for undergraduate studies? If so, did you buy your own or did your med school loan one to you?

    Thanks
    No, it definitely isn't. The anatomy dept of the med school will probably have one you can use during anatomy session but you shouldn't need one outside of that. There are plenty of excellent anatomy resources available to use to learn anatomy, and I'll tell you muscles and nerves are much more of a pain to learn than the bones!
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thraag)
    Hi

    Please could current (or recent) medical students advise whether it's necessary or advisable to have a skeleton for undergraduate studies? If so, did you buy your own or did your med school loan one to you?

    Thanks
    Not necessary, no. My college loaned us plastic skeletons for the first year, but while moderately useful in learning anatomy, it's perfectly manageable without.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ForestCat)
    No, it definitely isn't. The anatomy dept of the med school will probably have one you can use during anatomy session but you shouldn't need one outside of that. There are plenty of excellent anatomy resources available to use to learn anatomy, and I'll tell you muscles and nerves are much more of a pain to learn than the bones!
    Thanks for the advice.

    Following on from that, I've seen it suggested that a skull would be worth getting in order to see the many and various foramina, muscle insertions etc. Again, would you feel it's advisable to have one or is it unecessary?
    • Offline

      20
      (Original post by thraag)
      Hi

      Please could current (or recent) medical students advise whether it's necessary or advisable to have a skeleton for undergraduate studies? If so, did you buy your own or did your med school loan one to you?

      Thanks
      Having a skeleton is very useful, even if you aren't a med student. Otherwise you might wind up just collapsing onto the floor like a pile of mush.
      • Thread Starter
      Offline

      0
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by Tootles)
      Having a skeleton is very useful, even if you aren't a med student. Otherwise you might wind up just collapsing onto the floor like a pile of mush.

      Spoiler:
      Show


      Ah, yes. Good point, well-made.

      • TSR Support Team
      Offline

      18
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by thraag)
      Thanks for the advice.

      Following on from that, I've seen it suggested that a skull would be worth getting in order to see the many and various foramina, muscle insertions etc. Again, would you feel it's advisable to have one or is it unecessary?
      Unnecessary.
      Offline

      10
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by thraag)
      Hi

      Please could current (or recent) medical students advise whether it's necessary or advisable to have a skeleton for undergraduate studies? If so, did you buy your own or did your med school loan one to you?

      Thanks
      Of course, or your limbs would be all floppy.
      Offline

      12
      ReputationRep:
      I imagine most do. Furthermore, since actual human skeletons are in short supply, most will use a molded model of some kind. Why are the real ones in short supply you ask? Well...


      Offline

      20
      ReputationRep:
      Its something you get if you want to show you're 'eccentric'.

      Back IRL: huge waste of space. Most important anatomy is soft tissue anyway tbh.
      Offline

      13
      ReputationRep:
      Having your own skeleton is strongly recommended at medical school as attending clinical placements as an amorphous blob can make an already stressful period even more so. You will already have enough on your plate with revision and exams without having to protect vulnerable soft tissue and organs.
      Offline

      18
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by thraag)
      Hi

      Please could current (or recent) medical students advise whether it's necessary or advisable to have a skeleton for undergraduate studies? If so, did you buy your own or did your med school loan one to you?

      Thanks
      Naah. Bones are pretty straight forward, if you are really keen you can get a skull model as skull has lots of dimples and holes you are expected to remember.
      Instead I'd recommend getting an app on your phone or laptop with all the nerves, blood vessels and muscles.
      • Thread Starter
      Offline

      0
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by Nottie)
      Naah. Bones are pretty straight forward, if you are really keen you can get a skull model as skull has lots of dimples and holes you are expected to remember.
      Instead I'd recommend getting an app on your phone or laptop with all the nerves, blood vessels and muscles.
      Thanks everyone for your thoughts and guidance.
      Offline

      14
      ReputationRep:
      No, they have them in anatomy, and I don't think they're particularly any more instructive than illustrations in a book.
      Offline

      9
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by thraag)
      Thanks for the advice.

      Following on from that, I've seen it suggested that a skull would be worth getting in order to see the many and various foramina, muscle insertions etc. Again, would you feel it's advisable to have one or is it unecessary?
      If your medical school does head and neck quite in depth then I would definitely recommend a skull. Head and neck is much more 3D than the rest of the body and buying a skull definitely helped me. For the rest of the body I wouldn't really say it's necessary, but I'm sure some people find it somewhat useful. It all depends on how well you're progressing through anatomy, you may find you need nothing but atlases to understand.
     
     
     
  1. See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  2. Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
  3. See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  4. The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.