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    (Original post by Rose in Bloom)
    I read through this whole thread and was quite surprised by a few things. Its nice to see that for a change people aren't accusing ISLAM for anything, instead its the cultures to blame.And I agree with that.
    I am a very religious muslim girl myself...I think that Islam is to be followed correctly and directly through the commands in the Quran and in the Hadith..
    Allah sent the Quran with the commands and Prophet Muhammed (PBUH) showed us how to do them (sunnah)...so, in the light of Quran and sunnah, Islam is a very simple and harmless religion to follow...
    Many ppl say they are muslims but fail to carry out the most important things like pray 5 times aday...These are the ppl who have set a wrong impression of this religion...along with the international propaganda...BUT its our duty to bring them back on the correct path becuz Muhammad (PBUH) was the last prophet, and there will be no more until the day of judgement so its our job to guide these mislead muslims back on the staright path....
    As far as the issues of muslim women go, my personal opinion is that u have to be a muslim woman yourself to see how secure and respected u feel...

    Walaikum Assalam
    salaam dost.
    wow, that was one fantastic post. very well said! shukria for the rep btw

    neha
    xxxx
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    (Original post by neha p)
    salaam dost.
    wow, that was one fantastic post. very well said! shukria for the rep btw

    neha
    xxxx
    ...koi baat nahi..ur welcome!
    I try hard in getting the correct message ahead...
    u deserved the rep!

    Rose xxx
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    (Original post by Rose in Bloom)
    As far as the issues of muslim women go, my personal opinion is that u have to be a muslim woman yourself to see how secure and respected u feel...
    I doubt I'd feel respected if my rights were not equal to men, if I was beaten up by my husband all the time, if I HAD to wear huge clothing to cover myself up in the sweltering heat and I was always told I'm inferior.

    Nope, doesn't go down too well with me.
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    (Original post by Adhsur)
    I doubt I'd feel respected if my rights were not equal to men, if I was beaten up by my husband all the time, if I HAD to wear huge clothing to cover myself up in the sweltering heat and I was always told I'm inferior.

    Nope, doesn't go down too well with me.
    ..fair enough...thats ur opinion and it shud be respected...
    Everyone has the right of doing what they want to do...religiously and otherwise...

    Rose
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    (Original post by Rose in Bloom)
    Everyone has the right of doing what they want to do...religiously and otherwise...

    Rose
    Awww, I wish everyone thought that!
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    (Original post by giordano)
    Thanks for this post. However, the Quran does contain harsh words for women: most well-known, the wife-beating authorization contained in Surah An-Nisa, which I include yet again in the three translations I have found on the net:

    004.034
    YUSUFALI: Men are the protectors and maintainers of women, because Allah has given the one more (strength) than the other, and because they support them from their means. Therefore the righteous women are devoutly obedient, and guard in (the husband's) absence what Allah would have them guard. As to those women on whose part ye fear disloyalty and ill-conduct, admonish them (first), (Next), refuse to share their beds, (And last) beat them (lightly); but if they return to obedience, seek not against them Means (of annoyance): For Allah is Most High, great (above you all).
    PICKTHAL: Men are in charge of women, because Allah hath made the one of them to excel the other, and because they spend of their property (for the support of women). So good women are the obedient, guarding in secret that which Allah hath guarded. As for those from whom ye fear rebellion, admonish them and banish them to beds apart, and scourge them. Then if they obey you, seek not a way against them. Lo! Allah is ever High, Exalted, Great.
    SHAKIR: Men are the maintainers of women because Allah has made some of them to excel others and because they spend out of their property; the good women are therefore obedient, guarding the unseen as Allah has guarded; and (as to) those on whose part you fear desertion, admonish them, and leave them alone in the sleeping-places and beat them; then if they obey you, do not seek a way against them; surely Allah is High, Great

    There are other verses in the Quran which are kinder to women, but it is difficult to "interpret away" the negative ones.
    ok Islamic sheikh
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    (Original post by Adhsur)
    I doubt I'd feel respected if my rights were not equal to men, if I was beaten up by my husband all the time, if I HAD to wear huge clothing to cover myself up in the sweltering heat and I was always told I'm inferior.

    Nope, doesn't go down too well with me.
    is that what islam is?
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    (Original post by ThornsnRoses)
    is that what islam is?
    Perhaps not but that's how it is often interpreted and manipulated.

    And that's often the truth of the life of muslim women - more so than other women anyway.
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    (Original post by Adhsur)
    Perhaps not but that's how it is often interpreted and manipulated.

    And that's often the truth of the life of muslim women - more so than other women anyway.
    well you dont have to live l ike that....besides most women are abused , its just hidden...same thing...look at hindus and forced marriages and all that
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    (Original post by Adhsur)
    I doubt I'd feel respected if my rights were not equal to men, if I was beaten up by my husband all the time, if I HAD to wear huge clothing to cover myself up in the sweltering heat and I was always told I'm inferior.

    Nope, doesn't go down too well with me.
    If you are beaten up by your husband, then it has nothing to do with religion. The guy is not going by islamic law, and in Islam, that is not allowed. Beating us women happens no matter what your faith.
    Also, I guess many people are forced into wearing the hijab, but I was taught why we wore a scarf at a young age. There are many advantages of covering yourself up. For one thing, you are saved from unwanted attention from guys, who would see you for your hair and your body.
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    (Original post by Xenon)
    If you are beaten up by your husband, then it has nothing to do with religion. The guy is not going by islamic law, and in Islam, that is not allowed. Beating us women happens no matter what your faith.
    Also, I guess many people are forced into wearing the hijab, but I was taught why we wore a scarf at a young age. There are many advantages of covering yourself up. For one thing, you are saved from unwanted attention from guys, who would see you for your hair and your body.
    well said. As I'd like to say I've known more christian women that were beaten than muslims. And I know way more muslims. I simply dont know what you're talking about, adhsur.
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    (Original post by [email protected])
    From Amnesty International website:

    Women in Saudi Arabia who walk unaccompanied, or are in the company of a man who is neither their husband nor a close relative, are at risk of arrest on suspicion of prostitution or other "moral" offences.

    Nieves, a Filipina who was working as a maid in Riyadh in 1992, was invited by a married couple to celebrate the wife's birthday at a restaurant. She and a female friend decided to go. At the restaurant they were joined by a male friend of the couple. A group of mutawa'een (religious police) entered the restaurant, saw the group and arrested them. They suspected Nieves of being there for an introduction to the male friend of the couple. Nieves denied the accusation, but was deceived into signing a confession written in Arabic which she understood was a release order. That confession was the sole basis of her conviction and sentence - 25 days' imprisonment and 60 lashes which were carried out.

    Women in Saudi Arabia, whether Saudi Arabian or foreign, emerge time and again as victims of discrimination and human rights violations because of the gender bias in law, social mores and traditions. While women have gained some ground in terms of economic rights, their civil and political rights are systematically violated.

    Equal treatment for women and men is a fundamental principle of international human rights standards. Yet in Saudi Arabia discriminatory practices against women are not only prevalent, they are also in some cases required by law.

    Strict segregation of the sexes, an integral part of Saudi Arabian society, has adverse and unequal effects on women, who are denied equal educational opportunities and may work only in certain vocations. Women's freedom of movement is severely restricted. They may not travel abroad unless they have the written authorization of a male relative, usually their father or husband, and may have to be accompanied. Inside Saudi Arabia, they are forbidden to drive, a ban made official in 1990 by a Fatwa (edict) issued by the Council of Senior 'Ulama (religious scholars).

    Some laws are applied in a discriminatory fashion. The offence of khilwa (being alone with a male who is not an immediate relative), for example, is punishable for both men and women, but it appears to be more frequently enforced on women.

    Women who breach the strict dress code for women also face arrest. Margaret Madill, a Canadian nurse working in Saudi Arabia in 1993, took a taxi home with a female friend after a shopping trip in Riyadh. Suddenly a mutawa' jumped into the taxi and forced the driver to go to the headquarters of al-Mutawa'een. When they arrived, the women were locked in the taxi in the extreme heat for up to six hours. They screamed for help and were then beaten. They were accused of indecent dress and public intoxication. They were then transferred to al-Malaz prison and held for two days, before being released without charge.

    States are forbidden to criminalize the lawful exercise of rights enshrined in international human rights standards, such as the right to freedom of movement. In addition, laws should never discriminate against a particular group or be applied in a discriminatory manner.

    The abuse of women's rights in Saudi Arabia is not simply the unfortunate consequence of overzealous security forces and religious police. It is the inevitable result of a state policy which gives women fewer rights than men, which means that women face discrimination in all walks of life, and which allows men with authority to exercise their power without any fear of being held to account for their actions.

    ive heard of many examples similar to that, Islam, like christianity, has a perspective of what a man, and a women should do.
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    (Original post by vortex_199)
    well said. As I'd like to say I've known more christian women that were beaten than muslims. And I know way more muslims. I simply dont know what you're talking about, adhsur.
    Did u read my first long post sister?...
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    (Original post by Xenon)
    If you are beaten up by your husband, then it has nothing to do with religion. The guy is not going by islamic law, and in Islam, that is not allowed. Beating us women happens no matter what your faith.
    Also, I guess many people are forced into wearing the hijab, but I was taught why we wore a scarf at a young age. There are many advantages of covering yourself up. For one thing, you are saved from unwanted attention from guys, who would see you for your hair and your body.
    Very true.
    I think a lot of people see hijab and Islamic dress codes as repressing women, and that is a fair enough opinion, but many muslim women (myself included) see it quite differently. I personally think in the West there is a lot of pressure to look and be a certain way we are constantly bombarded with media images of size 10 women being told that this how we should look. In Islam it is easier to feel more comfortable about the way you look. In addition to this as you point out, modest dress, protects from the unwanted stares which I think is quite liberating.
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    (Original post by Adhsur)
    I doubt I'd feel respected if my rights were not equal to men, if I was beaten up by my husband all the time, if I HAD to wear huge clothing to cover myself up in the sweltering heat and I was always told I'm inferior.

    Nope, doesn't go down too well with me.
    It must depend on location as well. I cans ee how some must feel respected. I dont want to offend anyone on here, I have just spent 3 weeks in Egypt and eeryone was covered up except holiday makers it seemed. But I felt so dirty all the time cuz men were just looking me up and down, and I can see how in a culture like that women feel more respected and safe when they are covered. I guess it depends on where you live. And even in the uk you cant say that all wives here and treated equal to their husbands, it doesnt always work really. I wouldnt want to wear allt he clothing that comes with the islamic way of life but thats because i know something else i guess.

    Can someone help me though, when i was in Egypt some women didnt cover their faces, other did with only their eyes showing, some completely, and some are in black where as others are in coloured shawls, what is the differences between them? Is there one?
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    (Original post by Lil !*!)
    Can someone help me though, when i was in Egypt some women didnt cover their faces, other did with only their eyes showing, some completely, and some are in black where as others are in coloured shawls, what is the differences between them? Is there one?
    I think it is just personal preference and choice, but I can't be sure.
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    (Original post by Pegasus)
    Very true.
    I think a lot of people see hijab and Islamic dress codes as repressing women, and that is a fair enough opinion, but many muslim women (myself included) see it quite differently. I personally think in the West there is a lot of pressure to look and be a certain way we are constantly bombarded with media images of size 10 women being told that this how we should look. In Islam it is easier to feel more comfortable about the way you look. In addition to this as you point out, modest dress, protects from the unwanted stares which I think is quite liberating.
    If you choose to wear it yourself that is, but does Islam not instruct this?
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    u see woman bashing and making them feel inferior in all societies .... its not the religions that are at fault .... some ppl interpret them wrong .... u have to adapt ...

    like in pakistan the system of honor killing in feudal tribes is very much there ... but its been deemed illegal by the president and even though it exists ppl who commit the crime are punished ( most wiht the death penalty , quite rite too since they are no less than rapits)

    in india .. im not sure wether it exists n e more but Satti was very much dominant . It meant tht when a man dies , his wife was burned alive with him . Ill have to do some research to c if this custom still goes on .

    In the states u find reports of husband beating up their wives and most of them are under the influence of mainly alchohol and sumtimes even drugs . U cant blame christianity for that can u ?

    its sad to say it but most men who beat up their wives in saudi are also drunk when they do it ... its hard to believe but many saudi men drink a lot . I didnt believe it until i saw it myself .. go on a weekend and take a trip to king faisal bridge on the bahraini side ... saudi men cant even walk they are so drunk but yet they are behind cars ...

    alchohol and under mind influencing drugs are one of the main reasons for woman bashing in the modern world , not religion

    jus my two cents
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    (Original post by Pegasus)
    I think it is just personal preference and choice, but I can't be sure.
    It is personal preference..but in Surah Ehzab it says to cover yourself completely for the most respect and u can show ur hands, feet and eyes...

    But, if u only cover ur head..thats is also VERY good in the atmosphere we live in today...U shud always pray that Allah gives u more taqwa and u get better in ur religious practice...
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    If you choose to wear it yourself that is, but does Islam not instruct this?
    I'm not sure what you mean by that. Yes the Koran does state certain dress codes (can't be bothered to look up quotes). And yes I think its only liberating if the women herself is personally comfortable with it.
 
 
 
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