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    So I'm in year 11 and about to do my GCSEs. I would really like to know what studying veterinary medicine is actually like. I've wanted to be a vet since before I can remember and I know it is going to be really tough, but I'm on the right tracks at the moment. So please would someone like to tell me what it is like?
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    That's a pretty broad question, is there anything in particular you want to know about?

    Overall I'd say that studying a course that's preparing me for the career I always wanted, especially as I never really believed I could actually ever get here, is pretty swell

    I'll be honest, it's hard work, of course it is. And a lot of that work has to be done off your own back. I obviously can't comment on what your school is like, but mine was constantly calling people's parents in while claiming to be trying to turn us into independent learners. I much prefer how I can finally choose how much work I want to do, and how I do it, without having someone breathing down my neck the entire time, but at the same time, having fewer timetabled lessons and the lack of homework means that you need to adapt pretty quickly to really taking responsibility for your own learning.

    For the most part I enjoy lectures There will always be specific topics and lecturers that you don't like much, but the same can be said for school. For at least some units you'll likely be taught by real pioneers in their field that truly know their stuff. In contrast to some of my poorer teachers that would respond with 'you don't need to know, it's not on the syllabus' when I asked a question. Learning material is much more accessible than it is in school, for example lecture notes going up beforehand, and lectures being captured for future viewing.

    I've become a lot more social since coming to university, probably down to a mix of having a more flexible schedule and having more events organised that I can go to (sixth forms don't have social secretaries ). A lot of people take a 'work hard, play hard' attitude, which is good tbh, you can't spend your nose in a book the whole time.

    Overall, I'm so glad and proud to be here, and I wouldn't be doing anything else I'm so much happier and healthier than I was a couple of years ago, which is because I like having complete freedom around my education/life in general.

    Let me know if you have any specific questions about life at vet school
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    Thank you ever so much! That has really calmed me down because I know everything is going to be seriously hard and I'll have to study lots, but it is nice to hear you get time for yourself as well.
    I also wondered what a typical timetable would be because I have looked online and they look quite hefty but that was only to be expected.
    I have just requested all of the prospectuses for each university because I honestly don't know what they will be like because although my sister is in university atm, she is studying earth and environmental sciences, which is obviously quite different!
    What were the interviews for each university like and what did you have to do to get into one?
    I obviously know that you need excellent grades and lots of work experience which I am trying my best to get, but I wondered whether there was any leniency at all?
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    [QUOTE=phoebedodds;69970970]Thank you ever so much! That has really calmed me down because I know everything is going to be seriously hard and I'll have to study lots, but it is nice to hear you get time for yourself as well.[quote]
    Yes absolutely. Loads of people take up new hobbies at university, plus a lot more people work during term time than did at college; at least at my college. It's intense but it's possible to not let it take over your life.

    I also wondered what a typical timetable would be because I have looked online and they look quite hefty but that was only to be expected.
    Varies week on week and year on year. On average i'd say I have 2 or 3 lectures per day, a couple of group work sessions per week, then around 3-4 couple of practicals per week as well. That could be lab sessions (including histology), dissections, sessions with live animals or other things. We get one or two independent learning tasks per week as well, which are timetabled for us to do my ourselves and then we get feedback in a lecture or whatever. I'm in from morning to evening most days, but with gaps throughout the day, classes aren't back to back for now. It ramps up pretty significantly into clinical years I believe.

    I have just requested all of the prospectuses for each university because I honestly don't know what they will be like because although my sister is in university atm, she is studying earth and environmental sciences, which is obviously quite different!
    Good start, you next step is to get yourself to some open days

    What were the interviews for each university like and what did you have to do to get into one?
    I got offers from RVC, Edinburgh, Bristol and Liverpool, which all used the MMI format (like speed dating but for vet school ). Bristol also had a panel interview, and RVC's included a group task. I can't comment on other universities, I think with the exception of Cambridge they're tending towards MMIs, and I think Glasgow's includes a computer task. They'll obviously let you know more closer to the time though. I did a pretty hefty write up of vet school interviews here.

    As for what I did, lots! Got the predicted grades I needed, had lots of people check my personal statement before I sent it, and did plenty of work experience to prove I was keen. An exact breakdown of my grades and experience is at the bottom of my profile, if you're interested.

    I obviously know that you need excellent grades and lots of work experience which I am trying my best to get, but I wondered whether there was any leniency at all?
    It's about applying to your strengths; different vet schools place different amounts of value on different parts of your application. Liverpool are hugely focused on your work experience, Bristol weight your personal statement very heavily, Cambridge is predictably only really interested in your grades. Some, such as the RVC, seem to take a fairly holistic approach.

    Saying that there's 'leniency' I think would imply that you'd be likely to get a place without meeting the requirements, and if this is what you're asking then no. Vet schools get enough applicants to fill all of their places multiple times over; they don't need to be lenient. For now just focus on nailing your GCSEs and start getting some work experience in if you haven't already. If you're looking into it this early then you're in a good position.

 
 
 
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