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    I'm currently studying 4 courses at A-level, (Biology, Computer Science, Maths and Further maths), but I'm considering dropping Further Maths at A2. I'm quite interested in becoming a Vet and have recently been looking into it. I was wondering if there are any experienced vets out there that can tell me what they did to get to where they are now.

    I am predicted a B in all the subjects I am currently studying, but I'm aiming for an A in Biology. What are the required grades to go onto study veterinary medicine at University and is there anything I can do to make me more likely to get accepted into university (e.g Work Experience). '

    Any help appreciated.
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    (Original post by Abismuth)
    Any help appreciated.
    Hi,

    You can find the A level requirements for all the vet schools in the UK here.

    At current, you won't be able to apply anywhere for the five year course, due to you not doing A level chemistry. You also really need to be getting As rather than Bs in the subjects that you are currently studying.

    There is one course that you would be eligible to apply for; a six-year vet med course including a preliminary year, taught at Nottingham and aimed at people that haven't done the correct A levels to be considered for the five year program. By all means apply for this if you want, but personally I would advise taking a gap year after year 13, in which you can sit AS and A2 chemistry. You would apply for university in your gap year, for 2019 entry. I feel like this would be a safer option as you have a high chance of being rejected from Nottingham (nothing personal! Everyone has a good chance of being rejected from everywhere that they apply- it's a highly competitive course!), and this would prevent you putting all of your eggs into one basket.

    Work experience is an essential part of your application. It shows admissions tutors that you're serious about this; that you have at least a vague idea that what you're getting into is not about snuggling kittens all day, and that you won't freak out if you get covered in cow poop Universities vary in their actual requirements, but remember that this is competitive, and that you're applying against people who may have taken several gap years to garner experience, so it's in your best interest to get as much as possible. Quality and variety, however, are more important than sheer quantity, so aim to get placements from a range of animal environments to gain some insight into the different places where animals can work, and to learn about how proper husbandry can prevent disease.

    At the very least I would suggest getting to a small animal clinic, large animal clinic, commercial farm (if you can quickly arrange some lambing for this half term or Easter, that would be great! Dairy farms are also a very good shout), equine husbandry (i.e. a riding school if you're not very horsey) and kennels/catteries. Anything with animals is fair game though, so once you've done those feel free to branch out and get some more 'out-there' placements to help you stand out; for example a lab, an abattoir (Edinburgh are especially keen on this but it's not essential), wildlife parks/zoos, pet shops, dog groomers, urban farms, wildlife sanctuaries, guide dogs, horse/dog police units... the list goes on. Some places can get booked up multiple years in advance, so i would suggest organising this ASAP. Remember to get a reference from each placement that you attend as well, as these will be needed when you come to apply for university.

    I'm currently a vet student and if you want to know what I specifically did to get onto the course, it's all written on my profile, at the bottom.

    Hope this helps, let me know if you have any more questions

    Here are some resources that are really informative. I appreciate that it's a lot of reading but they're packed with information!
    Veterinary Medicine Wiki
    Veterinary Work Experience
    Applying to Vet School
    D100 on UCAS
    I Want To Be A Vet
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    (Original post by Little Tail Chaser)
    Hi,

    You can find the A level requirements for all the vet schools in the UK here.

    At current, you won't be able to apply anywhere for the five year course, due to you not doing A level chemistry. You also really need to be getting As rather than Bs in the subjects that you are currently studying.

    There is one course that you would be eligible to apply for; a six-year vet med course including a preliminary year, taught at Nottingham and aimed at people that haven't done the correct A levels to be considered for the five year program. By all means apply for this if you want, but personally I would advise taking a gap year after year 13, in which you can sit AS and A2 chemistry. You would apply for university in your gap year, for 2019 entry. I feel like this would be a safer option as you have a high chance of being rejected from Nottingham (nothing personal! Everyone has a good chance of being rejected from everywhere that they apply- it's a highly competitive course!), and this would prevent you putting all of your eggs into one basket.

    Work experience is an essential part of your application. It shows admissions tutors that you're serious about this; that you have at least a vague idea that what you're getting into is not about snuggling kittens all day, and that you won't freak out if you get covered in cow poop Universities vary in their actual requirements, but remember that this is competitive, and that you're applying against people who may have taken several gap years to garner experience, so it's in your best interest to get as much as possible. Quality and variety, however, are more important than sheer quantity, so aim to get placements from a range of animal environments to gain some insight into the different places where animals can work, and to learn about how proper husbandry can prevent disease.

    At the very least I would suggest getting to a small animal clinic, large animal clinic, commercial farm (if you can quickly arrange some lambing for this half term or Easter, that would be great! Dairy farms are also a very good shout), equine husbandry (i.e. a riding school if you're not very horsey) and kennels/catteries. Anything with animals is fair game though, so once you've done those feel free to branch out and get some more 'out-there' placements to help you stand out; for example a lab, an abattoir (Edinburgh are especially keen on this but it's not essential), wildlife parks/zoos, pet shops, dog groomers, urban farms, wildlife sanctuaries, guide dogs, horse/dog police units... the list goes on. Some places can get booked up multiple years in advance, so i would suggest organising this ASAP. Remember to get a reference from each placement that you attend as well, as these will be needed when you come to apply for university.

    I'm currently a vet student and if you want to know what I specifically did to get onto the course, it's all written on my profile, at the bottom.

    Hope this helps, let me know if you have any more questions

    Here are some resources that are really informative. I appreciate that it's a lot of reading but they're packed with information!
    Veterinary Medicine Wiki
    Veterinary Work Experience
    Applying to Vet School
    D100 on UCAS
    Thanks for the reply.
    I wish I had more of an idea of what I wanted to aim for before I went to college. I knew I wanted to do something involving animals, but wasn't quite sure. This is why I took the safer option (at the time) to pick maths because I felt more confident in the subject. If I knew at the time what I wanted to do, chemistry would have defiantly replaced further maths or computer science.

    I'm glad I'm thinking about this now because I have more options on what to do. I have plenty of time to get work experience in, especially if I take up chemistry after I have finished my current courses, or if I take the option to restart and pick biology and chemistry. This will give me at-least 2-3 years to get some good experience in at many different places.

    What would you recommend doing, continuing with what I am doing and take up chemistry after, or restart after this year and take up chemistry. This will mean I have to restart the first year of biology which I am completely fine with as it will be more revision on the first year topics.

    Regards,
    Edgar.
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    (Original post by Abismuth)
    What would you recommend doing, continuing with what I am doing and take up chemistry after, or restart after this year and take up chemistry. This will mean I have to restart the first year of biology which I am completely fine with as it will be more revision on the first year topics.
    It's up to you, but I would personally suggest finishing your current courses and doing chemistry in a gap year. It sounds as if you're going to have to spread your A levels over three years anyway, so you may as well continue with what you're doing now to have something to show for this year, rather than restarting now. If you're only doing chemistry one year then you'll have time for more work experience (universities will count a certain amount of experience booked for after the application deadline, and possibly a job or something if you wanted.
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    (Original post by Little Tail Chaser)
    It's up to you, but I would personally suggest finishing your current courses and doing chemistry in a gap year. It sounds as if you're going to have to spread your A levels over three years anyway, so you may as well continue with what you're doing now to have something to show for this year, rather than restarting now. If you're only doing chemistry one year then you'll have time for more work experience (universities will count a certain amount of experience booked for after the application deadline, and possibly a job or something if you wanted.
    That makes more sense, if I continue the courses I am currently on and take up just chemistry after, like you said it will give me more time for work experience and more time to dedicate to revision as it just one subject. Also if I don't get good enough grades in the subjects I continue to study, I have the option to retake them (only biology and maths). I feel really annoyed in myself for picking computer science and further maths as I really cant think of a reason for choosing them. I think I was sort of pressured by my teachers to pick them because I was strong in maths, but frankly I can't stand it.
    My advice to anyone about to start A-Levels is to pick the subjects you want to do and have a passion for, not just the ones you are stronger in and almost expected to pick.

    Again, thanks for the reply,
    Edgar.
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    (Original post by Abismuth)
    That makes more sense, if I continue the courses I am currently on and take up just chemistry after, like you said it will give me more time for work experience and more time to dedicate to revision as it just one subject. Also if I don't get good enough grades in the subjects I continue to study, I have the option to retake them (only biology and maths). I feel really annoyed in myself for picking computer science and further maths as I really cant think of a reason for choosing them. I think I was sort of pressured by my teachers to pick them because I was strong in maths, but frankly I can't stand it.
    My advice to anyone about to start A-Levels is to pick the subjects you want to do and have a passion for, not just the ones you are stronger in and almost expected to pick.

    Again, thanks for the reply,
    Edgar.
    No worries, and I'm with you for picking subjects you like :yep: Let me know if you have any further questions.
 
 
 
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