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Robots 'could replace 250,000 UK public sector workers' watch

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    (Original post by yudothis)
    That would be a good thing.
    Well obviously, the only thing that stops this is global taxation in this scenario


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    (Original post by paul514)
    Yes that's fair enough but what happens when complex and creative jobs go?

    All we did through the different industrial revolutions was move more and more from manual to brain work.

    What happens when brain work goes?

    And regardless why do we even need to work when machines can provide for us


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    Most white collar work which has been largely insulated from automation unlike manufacturing does not involve a lot of creativity or brain work. A lot of it is routine like checking forms, answering phone calls and data inputting. The fact they have not been automated is they vary a lot and it has not been cost effective to do the work in analysing the work processes and make the required software.

    But an intelligent machine could adapt and learn many different tasks without having to be specifically programmed for each one making them cheaper to implement.

    But I doubt you could make an intelligent machine that is more creative than a human since whoever made the machine would also have to be very creative and creativity is not something that can be quantified or specified.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    But I doubt you could make an intelligent machine that is more creative than a human since whoever made the machine would also have to be very creative and creativity is not something that can be quantified or specified.
    Well it worked in the 80s and 90s.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    Well it worked in the 80s and 90s.
    If only.
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    (Original post by XOR_)
    Damn robot immigrants, stealing our jobs.
    :rofl:
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    I admire the Shanghai Weilv Mechanism Company, one of China's largest manufacturers of manual typewriters. They make machines for a range of European language markets. They were set up in 2004. Yes, that is right. In 2004 someone thought that the future of written communication was the manual typewriter and decided to set up a business making them.
    Not the best idea for a placebo, but i guess it could work.
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    This is such an interesting and important topic!

    I'm currently reading Four Futures by Peter Frase, it sets out four possible sociological outcomes of mass automation. Check it out
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    Not surprising
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    (Original post by seagull36)
    This is such an interesting and important topic!

    I'm currently reading Four Futures by Peter Frase, it sets out four possible sociological outcomes of mass automation. Check it out
    Here's an interesting video from back in the day (1977)


    Kinda nostalgic and yet still current

    e.g. it shows executives and doctors dictating to secretaries who then type into a word processor which I'm pretty sure doesn't happen much these days.

    Main point is how shocking people in the 70s were finding it all

    Though the tech level is looks quite comical in parts the social shock had been very rapid - in 1977 cheap microprocessors had existed for about 5 years and people were thinking up brand new ways of using them to put people out of work constantly.
    compared to today - the iphone has existed for 10 years and each new revision is just really a minor incremental change on the previous one (sorry apple fanboys/girls) people are using their home PC's for largely the same things they were when windows 95 came out (trolling forums, spreading conspiracy theories

    in '77 the low hanging fruit was being picked quickly and a lot of things we recognise today, but were inconceivable in the early 70s were being introduced at a frightening rate - the main functional difference between the brand new 1977 supermarket till and the one today is that the shopper operates the till themself these days. Cars are assembled on robotic production lines that are recognisably descended from their 1977 ancestors and goods are stored in robotic warehouses.
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    Good.

    Humans spend far too much time doing useless busy work that could be automated freeing up a person for personal development and creative growth, or frankly anything they can well please.

    That automation hasn't really progressed and people are working more despite the predictions made by Keynes and other in the first half of the 20th century is the consequence of political decisions.
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    (Original post by mojojojo101)
    Good.

    Humans spend far too much time doing useless busy work that could be automated freeing up a person for personal development and creative growth, or frankly anything they can well please.

    That automation hasn't really progressed and people are working more despite the predictions made by Keynes and other in the first half of the 20th century is the consequence of political decisions.
    Keynes is one in a long line, automation has never been a thing that replaces work, merely something that changes work, and there is no reason to believe that will change any time soon.

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    Cheaper products, and more skilled jobs doesn't sound bad.

    Just more need for an educated work force
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    ...doctors dictating to secretaries who then type into a word processor which I'm pretty sure doesn't happen much these days.
    Actually it is still the standard thing to do!
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    Actually it is still the standard thing to do!
    Even if you're still too important to do your own typing in 2017 you'll probably have a computer on your desk.

    The unfortunate junior doctor in the film had to do his own typing... That's one of my favourite scenes - him bobbing in and out of examining a patient to have the computer tell him to check whether the patients feet were swollen etc.
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    Goverment IT?

    Really...?
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    Here's an interesting video from back in the day (1977)


    Kinda nostalgic and yet still current

    e.g. it shows executives and doctors dictating to secretaries who then type into a word processor which I'm pretty sure doesn't happen much these days.

    Main point is how shocking people in the 70s were finding it all

    Though the tech level is looks quite comical in parts the social shock had been very rapid - in 1977 cheap microprocessors had existed for about 5 years and people were thinking up brand new ways of using them to put people out of work constantly.
    compared to today - the iphone has existed for 10 years and each new revision is just really a minor incremental change on the previous one (sorry apple fanboys/girls) people are using their home PC's for largely the same things they were when windows 95 came out (trolling forums, spreading conspiracy theories

    in '77 the low hanging fruit was being picked quickly and a lot of things we recognise today, but were inconceivable in the early 70s were being introduced at a frightening rate - the main functional difference between the brand new 1977 supermarket till and the one today is that the shopper operates the till themself these days. Cars are assembled on robotic production lines that are recognisably descended from their 1977 ancestors and goods are stored in robotic warehouses.


    I think a lot of the shock to the public and also the shock to industry wasn't this technological change but the failure to embrace the labour changes brought about by previous rounds of technological change, If you look at the railways; there was clear technological change in the growth of private motoring and Dieselification but the Beeching report does not suggest changes in working practices to reflect these changes. Although steam traction disappeared in the late 1960s, 17% of BR trains still had firemen in 1984! Likewise, there was little effort to cut station staffing levels until the 1970s. Many UK labour practices became ossified around 1900 and remained the same. I remember the shock when Nissan came to Sunderland and made all employees wear the same uniform.

    Technological change varies over time. HMS Victory was ordered in 1758 47 years before Trafalgar. USS Nimitz currently en-route to the Sea of Japan was ordered in 1968 49 years before Pyongyang. Yet HMS Dreadnaught was 11 years old at the time of Jutland and that was the oldest frontline battleship on either side. The first aerial bombing of a city from an aeroplane was carried out when aircraft were only 11 years old. The B52 was ordered in 1946 and may finally get its chance to bomb Korea.

    When one looks at social change, whether as a result of technological or other changes, when something first happens isn't as important as when it becomes the norm. That can often be much harder to identify. When did men stop wearing hats? We know it was socially acceptable by the thirties. There are plenty of pictures of the Prince of Wales hatless; but look at pictures of crowds of men from the 1950s and most will be wearing hats. Hip replacements were invented in the 1960s. The government started keeping national statistics on them in 2003. There were 16,000 a year. Last year there were 102,000.

    But isn't the most remarkable change in 40 years the entirely unself-conscious group of male talking heads at the end of the programme.

    I am surprised that Horizon hasn't put the Horizon 2002 programme in this collection. In 1977 for the Silver Jubilee the BBC showed iconic programmes from over the past 25 years. As the representative of 1977, they had an episode of Horizon. Its conceit however, was that it was an Horizon programme made in 2002 for the Golden Jubilee looking back at previous Horizon programmes of the period 1978-2002. I watched it when it was first made and again when it was repeated in 2002.

    http://genome.ch.bbc.co.uk/785812cf7...d5a364fd12d31b

    Look at the programme titles from "1982" and "1988"
 
 
 
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